Preventing Medical Errors for Florida SLPs

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines how medical errors can be prevented in the practice of speech-language pathology.

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology is a 2-hour online CEU course for Florida SLPs.

The intent of this course is to include all of the elements required for an approved medical errors course for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists, including topics and case examples that will resonate with both novice and seasoned clinicians. It is a required course for Florida licensees and satisfies their biennial requirement. It is intended to be of clinical interest to all SLPs and audiologists who wish to increase their awareness of the ways in which patients can be harmed and the many strategies for anticipating and avoiding such undesirable outcomes.

This course addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s health care with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. Multiple scenarios of real and potential errors in the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology across the continuum of practice are included, along with recommended strategies for preventing them. Evidence shows that the most effective error prevention occurs when a partnership exists among care facilities, health care professionals, and the patients they treat. Course #21-31 | 2019 | 45 pages | 15 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

CE INFORMATION

ASHA-logo-long-PS-575

This course is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Professional area). 

ASHA credit expires 2/25/2024. ASHA CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the quarterly completion report from the ASHA Approved CE Provider (#AAUM5150). Please note that the date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter in which the course was completed. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, the Ohio Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and is CE Broker compliant (#50-1635). 

Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Medical Errors for Florida Mental Health

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the ways in which clients can be harmed in mental health practice, and the many strategies for anticipating and avoiding such undesirable outcomes.

This course is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the many types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records, and engaging in the practice of teletherapy. Course #21-18 | 2018 | 38 pages | 15 posttest questions

* This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals.

Click here to learn more.

This course is sponsored by Professional Development Resources, a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Breaches of Privacy and Confidentiality in Psychotherapy

Course excerpt from Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

Among the most elemental foundations of psychotherapy is the expectation that what is communicated with one’s therapist will remain private. Confidentiality violations are a major source of practice error and highly likely to cause harm to patients. There are actually three separate concepts here: privacy, confidentiality, and privileged communication.

Privacy is suggested by the 4th Amendment of the Bill of Rights (December 15, 1791) of the Constitution of the United States. Basically, it gives people the “right to secure their houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures…” (The United States Constitution). This is the most basic of the three terms (Cato Institute, 1776/2002). It is this historic and essential right that is at some risk of erosion under the problematic tenets of recent legislation like the “Patriot Act.”

Confidentiality agreementConfidentiality is an ethical term which denotes a contract between the client and the therapist in which the therapist promises to keep all utterances confidential, except those disclosures required by law. It is a principle given the most attention in almost all ethics codes and standard of care documents. According to Bernard and Goodyear (2008), this is so because confidentiality represents the essence of psychotherapy – a place where secrets and hidden fears can be disclosed. In more recent, increasingly litigious times, confidentiality has become less of a sacred trust and more of a “step-sibling to safety and judicial judgment.” Nonetheless, its role in the practice of psychotherapy has become no less central, only more complicated. Now the boundaries between the traditional therapeutic contract and considerations of legal liability must be mediated.

Privileged communication is a statutory term that refers to protecting clients from having their confidences publicly revealed during legal proceedings without their permission (Gladding et al., 2001, p. 20). Where such laws apply – and there are a large number of states where they are not legally supported – therapists are prevented from testifying in court about clients without their consent.

There are, of course, exceptions. The Florida Statutes Chapter 491 delineates the exceptions as follows:

491.0147 Confidentiality and privileged communications.–Any communication between any person licensed or certified under this chapter and her or his patient or client shall be confidential. This secrecy may be waived under the following conditions:

(1) When the person licensed or certified under this chapter is a party defendant to a civil, criminal, or disciplinary action arising from a complaint filed by the patient or client, in which case the waiver shall be limited to that action.

(2) When the patient or client agrees to the waiver, in writing, or, when more than one person in a family is receiving therapy, when each family member agrees to the waiver, in writing.

(3) When, in the clinical judgment of the person licensed or certified under this chapter, there is a clear and immediate probability of physical harm to the patient or client, to other individuals, or to society and the person licensed or certified under this chapter communicates the information only to the potential victim, appropriate family member, or law enforcement or other appropriate authorities. There shall be no liability on the part of, and no cause of action of any nature shall arise against, a person licensed or certified under this chapter for the disclosure of otherwise confidential communications under this subsection.

Three items are of note here. 1) Severe harm can come to clients whose therapists do not protect their privacy, ranging all the way from embarrassment to suicidal acts. 2) Harm is done to the profession when therapists demonstrate any disregard for the principles of confidentiality. 3) Confidentiality and its limits must be discussed in the first session of therapy in a competent informed consent process. Informed consent will be the topic of a detailed section later in this course.

Also relevant to a discussion of privacy and confidentiality are the areas of social media use, various forms of teletherapy, and the electronic storage and transmission of private health information. These topics will be discussed later in this course as well.

Confidentiality and HIPAA

Amidst all of the complexities of HIPAA legislation, one consideration will be briefly noted here: “routine” notes vs. “psychotherapy” notes. In short, routine notes are expected to be surrendered to outside parties and psychotherapy notes are expected to remain in the private records of the psychotherapist. Zuckerman (2009, p. 74) offers practical suggestions for sequestering sensitive therapy information that will provide more privacy protection in most cases from routine notes, which contains the nuts and bolts of a regular health care record.

Routine notes: If you mainly record the formalities of the therapy such as your interventions and the client’s responses you may feel comfortable in disclosing this to an insurer and so you have no need for records beyond the routine progress note.

Psychotherapy notes: If there is material which you believe you must record and yet you don’t want it shared with:

• The client because it is your working hypotheses and was of value only at one time. Remember, clients have no access to psychotherapy notes unless you give it
• Insurance companies or others who are not required to protect its confidentially as carefully as your profession requires you to
• Anyone else, because it is too sensitive and potentially damaging to the client or to others
• Other treaters, because they are not and will not be doing the kind of work you are with the client
• But you may want to share the information with professional students for training, or find value and meaning in these notes as you review them….

…the information should be kept in separate psychotherapy notes.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the many types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

By Leo Christie, PhD; Catherine Christie, PhD and Susan Mitchell, PhD

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that satisfies the medical errors requirement of Florida mental health professionals.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthWhen the Florida administrative code first mandated that licensees’ biennial continuing education requirement was to include two hours of training on the prevention of medical errors, there was a considerable amount of grumbling on the part of many licensees in the mental health field. The general sense of it was that – since we do not practice medicine – what is the relevance to our practice? The level of discontent was further amplified by the content requirement proposed by several of the Florida boards, which required specific topics to be included, topics that seemed to be more relevant to medical practice than psychotherapy practice.

Eventually, the courses offered by some accredited providers began to be more closely tailored to the needs of professionals who attend their clients’ psychological and emotional needs rather than to their medical needs. Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health was written to include all of the elements that are required for an approved medical errors course while including topics and case examples that will resonate with both novice and seasoned mental health professionals. While it remains a required course for Florida licensees and satisfies their biennial requirement, it is also intended to be of clinical interest to psychotherapists in other states who wish to increase their awareness of the ways in which clients can be harmed and the many strategies for avoiding such undesirable outcomes. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) to mark your answers on it while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & Dietetics – New Video CE Course

By Catherine Christie, PhD; Susan Mitchell, PhD

We now offer a new way for Florida-licensed dietitians and nutritionists to meet the medical errors renewal requirement – VIDEO! Imagine attending a live seminar at a time, location and dress code that works best for you. That is exactly what this video CE course allows you to do!

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & DieteticsPreventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & Dietetics is a new video-based CE course presented by Dr. Susan Mitchell and Dr. Cathy Christie, filmed during the 2014 FAND Annual Symposium. It addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety in the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Real life stories, national healthcare safety trends, reporting of sentinel events, complying with HIPAA privacy and security rules, telehealth practices, and caring communication techniques are addressed. Printable hand-outs, a glossary and online resources are provided. This course satisfies the requirements of the Florida State Legislature mandating a 2-hour medical errors course for health professionals. This course satisfies the Florida requirement that all licensed dietitians and nutritionists complete a 2-hour course on medical errors during each license renewal period. Course #20-86 | 2014 | 112 minute video | 15 posttest questions

This online video course provides instant access to the course video, course handout and CE test. The course is available 24/7 from any computer, tablet or smart phone, providing the easiest way yet to earn CE. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account) and mark your answers on it while viewing the video. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (#50-1635).

 

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology

Over the past 20 years, medical errors that result in patient injury or even death have become the focus of attention in both popular and professional publications. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) defines a medical error as: “The failure to complete a planned action as intended or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim.” Medical errors – which can occur in either the planning stage or the execution stage – are frequently communication errors, which are, unfortunately, very common in health care.

A 2011 Consumer Reports Poll on Hospital Safety interviewed 1,026 adults ages 18+ using a nationally representative probability sample. The results:

  • 77% expressed high or moderate concern re: harm by hospital infection during hospital stay
  • 71% expressed high or moderate concern re: harm by a medication error
  • 65% were similarly concerned about surgical errors

 

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language PathologyIn the State of Florida, speech-language pathologists and other health professionals are required to complete a course on the prevention of medical errors each time they renew their license. Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology is designed to help SLPs be vigilant to the kinds of medical errors that can occur in their practice and take proactive steps to prevent them. This course addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. Multiple scenarios of real and potential errors in the practice of speech-language pathology are included, along with recommended strategies for preventing them. Evidence shows that the most effective error prevention occurs when a partnership exists among care facilities, health care professionals, and the patients they treat. Suggested strategies for preventing errors address all three elements: (1) models for changing the culture in care facilities, (2) lifelong learning for SLPs that is focused on ethical, evidence-based, culturally competent practice and (3) tools for educating and empowering patients. * This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for biennial relicensure of Florida speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Course #20-77 | 2013 | 35 pages | 21 posttest questions | ASHA credit expires 4/20/2016.

One the most common medical procedures in which speech-language pathologists have a primary role is the evaluation and treatment of swallowing and feeding disorders. Because of the nature of swallowing disorders, treatment is frequently complex, and a number of dysphagia management issues have become very contentious. In addition, the potential for error, adverse outcomes and litigation is significant.

“This newly revised course teaches everyday strategies for preventing errors that can occur in the practice of speech-language pathology,” says Leo Christie, President and CEO of Professional Development Resources. “Rather than targeting individuals when a medical error happens, efforts today are focused upon those elements in the work environment like fatigue or distraction that can lead medical errors. This approach of focusing on system error over human error has proved to be useful in reducing the risk of patient injury.”

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology also includes a section on race and ethnicity. The authors point out that there is an increasing need for bilingual health professionals to serve the rapidly growing ethic segments of our population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2012), minorities comprise 37% of the U.S population. When professionals are not familiar with the cultural norms, customs, and languages of their patients, miscommunications can arise and cause serious diagnostic and treatment errors.

The course describes in detail a number of patient safety goals and concludes with a series of recommendations for improving interpersonal communication in order to prevent medical errors. Recommended strategies include the following:

  1. Slow down, speak slowly and spend a small amount of additional time with each patient
  2. Use plain, nonmedical language. Explain things as you would to your own grandmother.
  3. Show or draw pictures to help your patient understand and remember.
  4. Limit the amount of information provided, and repeat it.
  5. Use the “teach-back” technique to confirm that the patient understands.
  6. Create a shame-free environment by encouraging questions.
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Florida RD/NC License Renewal Information

By Gina Ulery, MS, RD, LD/N

Florida RDs can earn up to 20 hours for renewal online!Florida-licensed dietitians and nutrition counselors have an upcoming license renewal deadline of May 31, 2013. Thirty (30) hours of continuing education are required to renew, of which:

  • 2 hours on Preventing Medical Errors are required each renewal
  • 3 hours on HIV/AIDS are required for your first renewal only
  • 20 hours are allowed from home study or online courses (10 hours must be live)
  • Up to 10 hours are allowed in management type courses (non-clinical)

 

All of your hours must be logged in with CE Broker, whether by the course provider (we report all course completions within 1 week) or by yourself, in order for you to renew. If you have any questions on this, the folks at CE Broker are very helpful. You can reach them at 1-877-434-6323.

Still need CE? Use coupon code GINA25 to save 25% on courses @www.pdresources.org (enter code at checkout and click ‘update’ link to apply).

Remember, you’re allowed up to 20 hours from our courses and we’ll report to CE Broker for you. Courses are valid for 3 years from purchase date, so no rush to complete if you don’t need for the current renewal.

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (Provider #50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant.

12 Days of Christmas – Daily Deal #6

Our 6th day of Christmas daily deals in our 12 Days of Christmas promotion are:

Preventing Medical ErrorsPreventing Medical Errors

CE Credit: 2 Hours
Regular Price: $32
50% Off Today Only: $16!

This course addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. It satisfies the requirements of the Florida State Legislature mandating a 2-hour course relating to the prevention of medical errors as part of the licensure and renewal process for health professionals. Course #20-63 | 2011 | 30 pages | 14 posttest questions

Click here to order now! Sale ends @ midnight.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. * This course satisfies the ethics requirement for biennial relicensure for Florida mental health professionals. Course #20-64 | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. Multiple scenarios of real and potential errors in the practice of speech-language pathology are included, along with recommended strategies for preventing them. Evidence shows that the most effective error prevention occurs when a partnership exists among care facilities, health care professionals, and the patients they treat. Suggested strategies for preventing errors address all three elements: (1) models for changing the culture in care facilities, (2) lifelong learning for SLPs that is focused on ethical, evidence-based, culturally competent practice and (3) tools for educating and empowering patients. * This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for biennial relicensure for Florida speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Course #20-66 | 2010 | 33 pages | 16 posttest questions

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & Dietetics addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety in the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Real life stories, ethical considerations, health literacy and growing health consumerism are addressed. Also included are tips for distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific treatment claims and for improving communication with patients. Printable hand-outs, a glossary and online resources are provided. * This course satisfies the requirements of the Florida State Legislature mandating a 2-hour course relating to the prevention of medical errors as part of the licensure and renewal process for health professionals. Course #20-65 | 2011 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

Don’t forget to like our Facebook page to be entered in the drawing for a FREE course! Drawings held daily December 14-25.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC#5590); the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC #000279); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001); the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA #AAUM); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA #3159); and various state licensing boards.

Florida Speech Continuing Education & License Renewal

Florida SLPs can earn all 30 hours for renewal online!

Click to view ASHA-approved online CEUs!

Florida-licensed Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline on December 31, 2011.

Speech Pathologists or Audiologists must complete 30 hours (50 hours if dual licensed) of approved continuing education (CE) every 2 years for license renewal. The requirements are:

Speech Pathology or Audiology Assistants must complete 20 hours of approved CE within the biennium for which they are claimed. The requirements are:

Provisional Speech Pathologists or Audiologists are not required to obtain continuing education. However, approved CE taken while provisionally licensed may be used to satisfy the CE requirements for full licensure.

All Continuing Education must be Board or ASHA approved and earned within the biennium for which they are claimed.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course details for number of ASHA CEUs and expiration deadline. Who is eligible to earn ASHA CEUs?

See Rule 64B20-6, F.A.C. for more information about continuing education requirements:

As a condition of the biennial renewal of an active status license, the licensee shall attend and certify attending 30 credit hours, per biennium, of Board approved continuing education, twenty (20) of which shall be clinically related and two (2) of which shall be proof of completion of a course relating to prevention of medical errors. Those licensed as both audiologists and speech-language pathologists shall attend and certify attending 50 credit hours, per biennium, of Board approved continuing education, forty (40) hours of which shall be clinically related, twenty (20) in each specialty, of which two (2) hours shall be a Board approved course related to the prevention of medical errors.

The licensee or certificate holder shall maintain for a period of two years following renewal all documentation verifying the completion of the continuing education hours required for renewal. Upon request, such documentation shall be provided to the Board or Department.

The Board shall audit the files of randomly selected licensees and certificate holders to ensure compliance. Within 21 days of the receipt of such request from the Board or Department, the licensee or certificate holder shall provide evidence of completion of the required continuing education hours. Failure to maintain documentation of the required continuing education hours and submission of such upon request, or the submission of false or misleading information or documentation shall subject the licensee or certificate holder to disciplinary action.

Florida Board of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/speech/index.html