Telehealth: Quick Tips to Get Started

Telehealth is rapidly growing as we all adjust our lives due to COVID-19. Here are some quick tips and resources to help you get started.

The Coronavirus COVID-19 and resulting pandemic has changed so many aspects of our lives, that for many of us, life today almost seems surreal. Non-emergency in-office visits are now a thing of the past and telehealth is being pushed on us. We must keep at least a six-foot distance between ourselves and everyone else. For some of us, curfews have been imposed and only essential travel is allowed. And, in Florida, police are present at state lines, screening entrance into the state.

So, for therapists, counselors, psychologists, and all mental health professionals, the only answer is to turn to telehealth, also known as teletherapy, e-therapy, telemental health, telepractice, and telepsychology (among other names), which means a new learning curve. So here are some quick tips to help you get started:

Understand What Is Allowed And What Is Not

At the time of this writing, the HIPAA rules have been relaxed regarding
telehealth. Specifically, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of Health and Human Services (HHS), which has authority over HIPAA, states, “A covered health care provider that wants to use audio or video communication technology to provide telehealth to patients during COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency can use any non-public facing remote communication product that is available to communicate with patients.

What that means is that public facing platforms like Facebook Live, Twitch, and Tik-Tok should not be used for providing telehealth. However, platforms like Apple Facetime, Facebook Messenger video chat, Google Hangout video, or Skype can be used.

Important to note that the OCR does not endorse any of these. While greater privacy protection can be obtained by using HIPAA-compliant video communication solutions, the relaxation of the HIPAA policy means that non-public facing platforms – which would normally not be allowed – are now allowed, provided that they are used in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth. This means that to the provider’s knowledge, the platform used is private, and not accessible to the public.

Make Every Effort To Provide A Therapeutic Space

It is a given that when a patient enters an office for therapy, the room will be quiet, inviting, and most important, private and free from distractions. When offering therapy over the internet or phone, however, making the space where therapy will be offered similar to what would be expected in traditional therapy will take some effort.

To begin, be sure that the room you work in is quiet. While some things like your neighbor mowing his lawn may not be avoidable, things like the dog barking, kids screaming or playing in the background should be minimized.

Next ensure that the area you choose is one where you will be free from distractions. This may mean using a door sign for family members that reads, “In Session” so they will know not to interrupt you.

Lastly, choose an area where you feel like you can focus. While this may seem obvious, we do put effort into arranging a traditional office not just to be inviting for our clients, but also to help us feel comfortable, safe, inspired, and focused. So take some time to think about where you will feel most comfortable and if needed, create a space for yourself.

Encourage Your Client To Make His/Her Space Therapeutic

Just like it will take some effort on your end to make your space therapeutic, your clients will also need to think about where in their environment will be most quiet, secure, private, and free from distractions. Perhaps they has a home office that be used, a bedroom that is quiet, or even an outside area like a patio, deck, or backyard.

Again, what is most important is that your clients find a place where they truly feel comfortable and can focus without interruption. This may be somewhat challenging, especially with kids at home, however this is all the more reason to encourage your client to take the time to find the appropriate space, before teletherapy or e-therapy sessions begin.

Know Your Resources

Because telehealth is a new format for many of us, it is always helpful to know where to find more information when it is needed. In response to the emergency, HIPAA Journal has worked with Compliancy Group to set up a free hotline for any questions you may have related to HIPAA compliance during the COVID-19 crisis. That number is (800) 231-4096.

The first place to start is by checking with your professional licensing board website to find guidance specific to your state/profession.
https://www.pdresources.org/page/index/17/State-CE-Requirements

Federal Government Guidance on Telehealth

H.R. 6074, the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020, signed into law on March 6, gives states the ability to request waivers that would allow them to use Medicare and Medicaid funds for telehealth services without the “originating site requirement.” Under normal circumstances, patients are required to have one or more face-to-face appointments at a qualifying health care site before Medicare or Medicaid will pay for telehealth services. Counselors are not covered under Medicare, but Medicaid coverage varies by state. Most states cover Medicaid services provided by counselors, but some restrict the types of providers that can furnish telehealth services. States that have waivers approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services may lift some restrictions temporarily and begin covering counseling services via telehealth. Several other federal government agencies have released guidance important to behavioral health providers.

The National Association of Medicaid Directors lists contact information for each state Medicaid agency. If you are unsure of the status of Medicaid coverage for counselors providing telehealth in your state, contact your state Medicaid director’s office or govtaffairs@nbcc.org.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has also released additional guidance on telehealth for state Medicaid programs and provides general information on telehealth benefits in Medicaid.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) have issued guidance on the use of telemedicine for medication-assisted treatment. SAMHSA has also released guidance relating to the prohibitions on use and disclosure of patient identifying information under 442 CFR Part 2.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights has stated it will waive potential penalties for HIPAA violations against health care providers who serve patients through everyday communications technologies during the emergency.

The American Psychological Association (APA) has created Practice Resources in Response to COVID-19 (which includes information on telepsychology and telehealth) available at:
https://www.apaservices.org/practice/clinic?_ga=2.125054154.1107876864.1585682285-731192192.1585682285

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has posted Telepractice Resources During COVID-19 for Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists:
https://www.asha.org/About/Telepractice-Resources-During-COVID-19/

The National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) has developed a COVID-19 Information Page: https://www.nbcc.org/covid-19

The Trust Practice and Risk Management Association (TrustPARMA) also offers a free sample of an informed consent for e-therapy at: https://parma.trustinsurance.com/Workshops-Webinars/Telepsychology.

The Florida House of Representatives has updated their legislation to include standards of practice for telehealth providers in the state of Florida:
https://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bill/2019/23/BillText/er/PDF

The Florida Department of Health states: “Individual licensed health care professionals are required to use independent judgement or seek personal legal counsel as it relates to interpreting the Florida telehealth law and the various executive orders regarding telehealth by any method to ensure that the care provided meets the standards of the established scope of practice for the profession.”

The California Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (CAMFT) has also posted an overview of HIPAA considerations for implementing telehealth, as well as options for HIPAA compliant telehealth platforms at: www.camft.org/Resources/Legal-Articles/Telehealth-HIPAA-and-Compliant-TeleHealth-Platforms.

Lastly, the HIPAA announcement regarding the relaxation of policies during the COVID-19 national emergency can be found at www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/special-topics/emergency-preparedness/notification-enforcement-discretion-telehealth/index.html.

Offering telehealth is a wonderful resource, and thanks to the relaxation of HIPAA policies, now much more accessible to health professionals, and clients alike. Thankfully, the COVID-19 national emergency need not interrupt mental health services.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:

E-Therapy: Ethics & Best Practices is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the advantages, risks, technical issues, legalities, and ethics of providing therapy online.

E-therapy can be used to address age-old problems, such as how to reach out to those who might not otherwise avail themselves of psychotherapy services even though they are in acute need. At the same time, it is clear that many providers have embraced the new technologies without a firm grasp on the new and serious vulnerabilities that are introduced when their patients’ personal health information goes online. Included in this course are sections on video therapy, email, text messaging, smart phone use, social media, cloud storage, Skype, and other telecommunications services.

This course is focused upon the ethical principles that are called into play with the use of e-therapy. Among them the most obvious concern is for privacy and confidentiality. Yet these are not the only ethical principles that will be challenged by the increasing use of e-therapy. The others include interjurisdictional issues (crossing state lines), informed consent, competence and scope of practice, boundaries and multiple relationships, and record keeping.

In addition to outlining potential ethical problems and HIPAA challenges, this course includes recommended resources and sets of specific guidelines and best practices that have been established and published by various professional organizations. Course #31-19 | 2019 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

PDR offers over 150 accredited online CE courses for healthcare professionals. 

Target AudiencePsychologistsSchool PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapists (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs), and Teachers

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Special Needs Financial Resources

Special Needs Financial Resources

Parents of children with disabilities may be worried about how they will pay for the expenses they will encounter throughout their child’s life. Luckily, there are many financial resources available for children with disabilities that can be used to help defray costs of care. The following resources may be of potential use:

Health Insurance for Kids with Disabilities

Insurance plans for families of children with disabilities come in many forms, each with their own sets of benefits and limitations. The list below details several insurance options that may be of interest to families of children with disabilities:

  • Private Insurance: Insurance distributed privately to individuals and families, often through an employer or other organization. Private insurance takes many forms including indemnity insurance (or “fee-for-service”), health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and point of service plans (POSs). It may be advisable to speak with a benefits administrator or insurance coordinator about the benefits and limitations of your plan, and about which specific plan will work for you.
  • Non-Private Insurance (Public Insurance): Insurance programs funded by local, state, or federal government departments, or large organizations. Public insurance is often used by those who do not receive employer-sponsored insurance or those who cannot afford it. Three important sources of non-private insurance that may help families of children with disabilities are Medicaid, Medicare, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Education Assistance

Children with disabilities often require educational supports to maximize their learning experience. Sometimes, these differences may increase the costs of education for students with disabilities. Because of this, students with disabilities each have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). These documents contain an assessment of a child’s current educational status, along with a summary of their annual progress goals and plans for transitions as they age. In addition, an IEP will include mention of any support, service, or accommodations needed for the student to excel in their educational setting. Once an IEP contract is drawn up, financial funding from the public school district will work to pay for the services needed.

Personal Accounts and Trusts

There are a few types of financial accounts that can be created for a child with disabilities that can help to pay for medical, therapeutic, and other daily costs.

  • ABLE Accounts: These are savings accounts that are subject to certain tax-advantages that other savings accounts are not. Individuals with disabilities are eligible for ABLE accounts if they fall below a designated income and resource level. The money in these accounts can be used for anything that considered a “qualified disability expense,” which provides some more choice and control for the individual and his/her family than other savings special needs savings options.
  • Flexible Spending Account (FSA): These accounts allow individuals to set aside money from their employee benefit plan that can be used to help with medical or other qualified expenses. This money is not taxed, but the money must be spent by the end of the benefit year.
  • Health Savings Account (HSA): A health savings account is very similar to a FSA, except that the money can be saved over time in this non-taxed account. Only people enrolled in a High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) are eligible for an HSA.
  • Health Reimbursement Account (HRA): These accounts are funded by employers and set aside a certain amount of non-taxed money that is used to reimburse employees for the medical expenses of their family members. These plans vary based on employer contracts and preferences.
  • Special Needs Trusts (SNT): Special needs trusts may be opened in the name of an individual with disabilities by a family member or loved one. These trusts do not count as income or assets, so their existence will not impact the beneficiary’s eligibility for public health insurance programs like Medicaid. The money placed in an SNT is under the control of a trustee who is in charge of spending this money in a way that helps the beneficiary. SNT funds can be used on things like personal care attendants, out-of-pocket medical expenses, and more recreational spending.
  • Pooled Trusts: Pooled trusts are often used instead of SNTs in situations where there is no single trustee available, or there is not enough initial funding to open a special needs trust. In pooled trusts, money is given to a non-profit organization who manages it over the course of the beneficiary’s lifetime.

If you feel your financial skills are not adequate to make decisions about your child’s financial future, or you just would like some extra help, it may be useful to hire someone to assist you. Depending on your situation you might consider:

  • A Financial Planner – A licensed financial planner is a qualified individual who can advise you on how to spend and allocate your assets. This may be beneficial for your family if you are unsure about how to spend and save your money. There are often financial planners who specifically work with families of children with disabilities. These planners will be well-versed in the many saving and spending options associated with disabilities.
  • An Attorney for Estate Planning – An attorney for estate planning will function similarly to a financial planner, except that he or she can provide legally binding contracts that work to protect resources for your child. An attorney that focuses on estate planning will be aware of the potential benefits and drawbacks involved in setting up trusts and may help you safely allocate your money.

Income and Tax Help

Families of children with disabilities may be eligible for financial assistance that can supplement their income, or help to avoid paying taxes on disability-related expenses. Some income and tax benefits are available through:

  • Supplemental Security Income: This program works to assist disabled adults and children who have limited income and financial resources. Unlike public insurance programs, SSI funding comes in the form of cash and can be used to pay for food, clothing, shelter, and other basic needs. SSI is distributed monthly, and like its name suggests, works alongside traditional income to help ensure that families of children with disabilities can support their needs.
  • Federal Income Tax Credits: Tax credits reduce the amount of taxes that a family is required to pay. Parents of a child with a disability may be eligible for certain tax credits, each with its own value and eligibility criteria. For more information on federal income tax credits for disability, visit the IRS website and/or speak to your financial advisor.

The HIE Help Center is a resource site that provides families with information about, and resources for, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), cerebral palsy, and other associated disabilities.

Resources

Psychotherapists & Social Media – Free Webinar

Free webinar offered through our partnership with therapysites

Psychotherapists & Social MediaChances are good that you know how to use social media for marketing, socializing, and networking. But come learn about the common pitfalls and mistakes that are common to well meaning psychotherapists. Make sure that you steer clear of potential ethical breaches and that your social media practices are consistent with ethical guidelines.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the important ethical guidelines that are applicable to our online behavior.
  • Distinguish between personal and professional behavior online.
  • Describe the current research on therapist/client interactions on the internet.

REGISTER NOW! You won’t want to miss it!

Webinar Title: What Psychotherapists Should NOT Do on Social Media

When: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 2:00 – 3:00p EDT

Choose Professional Development Resources from the drop down question of “How did you hear about the webinar?”

About the speaker:

Keely Kolmes, Psy.D.Keely Kolmes, PsyD, is a licensed psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, CA. Dr. Kolmes writes, does research, and provides consultation and training on clinical and ethical issues related to social networking and technology. Her Private Practice Social Media Policy has been internationally taught and adapted across health disciplines. She has published a New York Times Op-Ed on the challenge of consumer reviews of mental health services and developed Getting Better, a product to help clinicians track treatment outcomes and address client satisfaction on the Internet. She has been quoted in The Washington Post, Forbes, WIRED, BBC News, and HuffPostLive.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:

Ethics and Social Media is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the use of Social Networking Services (SNS) on both our personal and professional lives. Is it useful or appropriate (or ethical or therapeutic) for a therapist and a client to share the kinds of information that are routinely posted on SNS like Facebook, Twitter, and others? How are psychotherapists to handle “Friending” requests from clients? What are the threats to confidentiality and therapeutic boundaries that are posed by the use of social media sites, texts, or tweets in therapist-client communication? The purpose of this course is to offer psychotherapists the opportunity to examine their practices in regard to the use of social networking services in their professional relationships and communications. Included are ethics topics such as privacy and confidentiality, boundaries and multiple relationships, competence, the phenomenon of friending, informed consent, and record keeping. A final section offers recommendations and resources for the ethical use of social networking and the development of a practice social media policy. Course #20-75 | 2016 | 32 pages | 15 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources, Inc. is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) that provides accredited online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses for licensed healthcare professionals. We are approved by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

Small Steps to Living Healthy

From Florida Health

Small Steps to Living HealthyHealthiest Weight Florida is taking a new and creative approach to helping Floridians reach their healthy weight and live a healthy lifestyle. The program recently announced the launch of its new Small Steps to Living Healthy! campaign, which is a weekly email campaign that allows participants to sign up for weekly tips and tricks to help them reach their healthiest weight. Information is clear, concise and there to help participants take those difficult first steps to living healthy.

The program is free and participants can register or opt out at any time. Each week of the month the program will highlight a designated topic area:

  • Set Goals. At the beginning of each month, a challenge and health tip will be emailed. Examples of challenges include replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with water or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.
  • Move More. During the second week of the month, physical activity will be the highlighted. Participants will be introduced to different styles of exercise and the benefits of each, including options for persons with disabilities.
  • Be in the Know. Week three “fun fact” emails will provide facts on other aspects of healthy living related to healthy weight such as stress, depression and time use.
  • Eat Smart. The focus of this week’s email will be nutrition. Florida fruits and vegetables of the month, as well as recipes, will be offered through the Living Healthy in Florida Campaign.


Emails will continue throughout the year, but will never be sent more than once a week. Click here to sign up for Small Steps to Living Healthy.

To learn more about Healthiest Weight Florida visit www.healthiestweightflorida.com.

FREE CE Course Drawing!

From Professional Development Resources

Like us on Facebook for a chance to win a FREE CE course! The free course drawing for May is being held today! (Drawings held monthly.)

May Free Course Drawing

 

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Online College Degree Resource for Florida Residents

By Kayla Lee

As college tuition continues to rise, an increasing number of students are looking at online degree programs. The amount of inaccurate information can be simply overwhelming. This is why we’ve made it our mission at OnlineColleges.net to research and provide an accurate resource, going so far as to collect our own school-level data that’s more accurate than the National Center for Education Statistics’ IPEDS database.

OnlineColleges.net

Our comprehensive resource includes:

  • The most affordable online colleges in Florida, including the most complete program-level information available on the web
  • A curated list of scholarships available to Florida students, along with a database of nearly 20,000 general scholarships
  • A searchable database of all accredited online colleges in Florida


Florida residents interested in pursuing higher education can view the resource here: http://www.onlinecolleges.net/florida/.

OnlineColleges.net is a practiced leader in online education information, with our materials referenced on the sites of organizations including the University of Washington, Northwestern University, the City of Indianapolis and many others.

About OnlineColleges.net: With a focus on emerging trends and developments in online education, OnlineColleges.net has been informing prospective students since 2009. OnlineColleges.net provides free student guides and college search information, along with expert advice from Melissa Venable, PhD, an experienced online instructor and thought leader.

Spring into April CEU Specials

New Monthly Specials @ $10/Credit Hour!

Monthly-Specials-HP

Spring is here and so are your new April CE Specials! New ways to save on CE, including a FREE video course (NOT an April Fool’s Joke!).

p.s. Easter sale coming Friday…

Caregiver-Help-Free

Caregiver Help: Sex and Dementia explores how Alzheimer’s and other dementia-related diseases impact the brain in ways that can cause some challenging behaviors. Course #10-86 | 2015 | 55 minutes | 7 posttest questions

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Learning Level: Introductory Video Course
Sale Price: FREE! (reg $14)
Enroll Now!

Anti-Social-Youth

Anti-Social Youth & Conduct Disorders offers tailored tools that you need to manage and help anti-social and conduct disordered youth and children. Course #30-30 | 2012 | 35 pages | 20 posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $30! (reg $39)
Enroll Now!

Emotional-Overeating

Emotional Overeating: Practical Management Techniques discusses the causes of emotional eating and provides exercises to eliminate the addictive pattern. Course #40-26 | 2011 | 44 pages | 30 posttest questions

CE Credit: 4 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $40! (reg $56)
Enroll Now!

Prescription-Drug-Abuse

Prescription Drug Abuse examines the effects of the rise in prescription drug abuse, as well as treatment options for abusers. Course #30-61 | 2012 | 30 pages | 20 posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $30! (reg $39)
Enroll Now!

Clergy-Stress-Depression

Clergy Stress and Depression provides an understanding of the complex factors that cause stress and depression in clergy, along with recommendations for treatment. Course #40-32 | 2013 | 52 pages | 30 posttest questions

CE Credit: 4 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $40! (reg $56)
Enroll Now!

HIV-AIDS

HIV/AIDS: Therapy & Adherence discusses adherence issues and provides strategies for encouraging people with HIV to seek and maintain medical treatment. Course #30-78 | 2015 | 43 pages | 22 posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $30! (reg $39)
Enroll Now!

10-Reasons

Ten Reasons Not to Worry (Too Much) About Malpractice Claims presents ten reasons why the risk of a malpractice claim is really not very high. Course #10-64 | 2013 | 22 pages | 10 posttest questions

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Learning Level: Introductory Online Course
Sale Price: $10! (reg $19)
Enroll Now!

Visuals-for-Autism

Visuals for Autism: Beyond the Basic Symbols demonstrates when, how, and why to use visuals with students with autism. Course #20-94 | 2015 | 14 posttest questions

CE Credit: 2 Hours
Learning Level: Introductory Video Course
Sale Price: $20! (reg $38)
Enroll Now!

Alzheimers-Caregiver-Guide

Alzheimer’s Caregiver Guide and Tips on Acute Hospitalization offers strategies for managing the everyday challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s. Course #10-81 | 2010 | 17 pages | 7 posttest questions

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Learning Level: Introductory Online Course
Sale Price: $10! (reg $19)
Enroll Now!

Celiac-Disease

Celiac Disease: Basics & Beyond explains the basics of celiac disease from prevalence and pathophysiology to diagnosis and management. Course #20-76 | 2013 | 26 pages | 17 posttest questions

CE Credit: 2 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate Online Course
Sale Price: $20! (reg $28)
Enroll Now!

Hurry, sale ends April 30, 2015! Sale prices valid on future orders only.

 10 Off  99

$10 Off $99 – All the Time!

Instantly save $10 on orders $99 or more (after coupons). Automatically applies at checkout. Valid on future orders only.

Earning CE Credits from the comfort of your own computer or tablet has never been so easy. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); theCalifornia Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the TexasBoard of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Holiday Hints for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

By the National Institute on Aging

Holiday hints for Alzheimer’s caregiversHolidays can be a wonderful time to visit and reconnect with family, friends, and neighbors for people with Alzheimer’s and caregivers. Balancing special holiday activities with everyday care for a person with Alzheimer’s disease may also seem overwhelming. Here are some tips for making things a little easier:

  • Set your own limits, and be clear about them with others. You don’t have to do everything you used to do.
  • Encourage friends and family to visit even if it’s difficult, but limit the number of visitors at any one time.
  • Explain to guests ahead of time that memory loss is the result of the disease and is not intentional.
  • During the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, be sure to take care of yourself. Guard against fatigue and find time for adequate rest.

For more tips on how to prepare ahead of time and find a good balance during the holidays, download Alzheimer’s Caregiving Tips: Holiday Hints. This free tip sheet is available as a PDF and an eBook.

Cultural Formulation Interview

By NAMI and APA

cultural competence in healthcarePsychiatric and mental health in America has not succeeded at engaging people diagnosed with mental illness in their own care and empowering them and their families to become true partners with their providers. Misunderstandings and miscommunications can lead to dissatisfaction with treatment and sometimes even discontinuation. But when the whole of a person is taken into account, not only is the person likely to stay in treatment, they are likely to have a greater chance of recovery.

The APA is offering the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI), including the Informant Version, and the Supplementary Modules to the Core Cultural Formulation Interview for further research and clinical evaluation. They should be used in research and clinical settings as potentially useful tools to enhance clinical understanding and decision-making and not as the sole basis for making a clinical diagnosis. Additional information can be found in DSM-5 in the Section III chapter “Cultural Formulation.” The APA requests that clinicians and researchers provide further data on the usefulness of these cultural formulation interviews at http://www.dsm5.org/Pages/Feedback-Form.aspx.

Online assessment measures, including the CFI, are available @ http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/dsm/dsm5/online-assessment-measures#Cultural.

The Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) is a set of 16 questions that clinicians may use to obtain information during a mental health assessment about the impact of culture on key aspects of an individual’s clinical presentation and care.

The goal of the CFI is to lay the foundation for person-centered care and shared decision-making by encouraging clinicians to engage people seeking services and their families, from the very start, in a dialogue about how their cultural identities, values and prior experiences shape their care expectations and goals. But the CFI remains an underdeveloped tool. Clinicians and people living with mental illness need to know that it exists, and to use it to build a new type of partnership, without prejudice or stereotypes. All people diagnosed with mental illness have cultural identities, and our mental health system cannot expect any one of them to leave who they are at the door.

Need a Website? TherapySites Can Help!

By Gina Ulery

Professional Development Resources has partnered with TherapySites to provide a special offer for websites & online marketing services made for mental health professionals.

TherapySites

TherapySites specializes in creating websites designed for therapists that are professional, affordable, and effective. All you pay is a monthly hosting fee of $59/month with no long-term contracts. They deliver credit card processing, appointment requests, search engine optimization, and more – it’s all included! Attracting new clients and generating more revenue is easy with TherapySites!

Visit TherapySites today and provide promo code of PDR to receive A Free Website and One Month of Hosting Service.