Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2019

The latest volume in our Therapy Tidbits series is here:

Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2019 is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the March/April 2019 issue of The National Psychologist.

Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2019 is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the March/April 2019 issue of The National Psychologist, a private, independent bi-monthly newspaper intended to keep psychologists informed about practice issues. The articles included in this course are:

  • Major Push Seeks to Expand RxP Jurisdictions – Discusses the efforts of the RxP movement, including challenges along the path to prescription authority for psychologists.
  • Controversy Swirls around APA Guidelines on Men, Boys – Explains the purpose of the APA guidelines, and the criticism they have undergone.
  • PSYPACT Almost Ready to Take Effect – Introduces what PSYPACT is and explains what needs to happen for it to commence.
  • Retirees are Untapped Market for Psychologists – Explains how psychologists can help those planning for retirement, and those who are in process of it.
  • Integrated Care is Future for Psychology – Acknowledges the changing healthcare platform and provides suggestions for future psychologists to excel in integrated care.
  • Rule-Making, State Boards Reshaping Psychology – Questions the TSBEP decision to grant unsupervised practice to masters-level Licensed Psychological Associates (LPAs).
  • Pain Management Demands Attention to Mental Health – Discusses how psychologists can be integral in ending the war on prescription drug abuse.
  • Choosing Interpreter Requires Considerations – Provides points to consider when choosing an interpreter for use in clinical practice.
  • Practicalities in Animal Assisted Therapy – Provides practical, experience-based advise on including animals in your practice with patients.

Course #11-26 | 2019 | 19 pages | 10 posttest questions

  • CE Credit: 1 Hour
  • Target Audience: Psychologists
  • Learning Level: Introductory
  • Course Type: Online

CE INFORMATION

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and the Office of School Psychology and is CE Broker compliant (#50-1635).

COURSE DIRECTIONS

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You’ll have 3 years from purchase date to complete for credit.  Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Therapy Tidbits – Jan/Feb 2019

Therapy Tidbits – January/February 2019

Therapy Tidbits – January/February 2019 is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the Jan/Feb 2019 issue of The National Psychologist, a private, independent bi-monthly newspaper intended to keep mental health professionals informed about practice issues. The articles included in this course are:

  • 2019 Brings Overhaul of Testing Codes and Payment Changes– Discusses the new coding structure for central nervous system (CNS) assessments and confusion about the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).
  • 2019 Code Changes, MIPS Requirements, Oh My! – Explains the major procedure code changes coming in 2019 and how psychologists may be impacted.
  • Midterm Elections Don’t Signal Single-Payer Health Care Anytime Soon – Reviews the current state of health care possibilities following the midterm election results.
  • Psychology and Song – Examines how music can affect us both physiologically and emotionally.
  • Fee Splitting is Unethical – and Sometimes Illegal – Describes the ins and outs of fee splitting and how to remain both ethical and legal in practice.
  • 3 Questions to Ask HIPAA Vendors – Provides answers for three important questions to consider when selecting a HIPPA service.
  • Meeting Needs, Not Schedules – An inside look at the concierge model of psychology, including tips for successful practice.
  • Confronting Dissatisfaction with Professional Services – Provides twelve risk management strategies for psychologists to minimize and hopefully avoid consumer dissatisfaction, as well as ethical and legal complaints
  • Advertising Offers Must be Ethical – Reviews considerations for advertising psychological services both ethically and legally.
  • Kids’ Behavior Problems Often Misdiagnosed – Discusses the ramifications of different parenting factors on children’s behavior and the misdiagnosing of emotional and behavioral disorders.

Course #11-25 | 2019 | 22 pages | 10 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

North Carolina Psychologists CE

North Carolina Psychologists Save 20% on CE @pdresources.org

North Carolina Psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of September 30, 2018.

Licensees must complete a minimum of 18 continuing education (CE) hours over each two-year renewal period. A minimum of 9 hours must be in Category A programs or activities, which must include 3 hours in the area of ethical and legal issues in the professional practice of psychology.

North Carolina Psychology Board  
CE Required: 18 hours, even years (9 hrs must be Cat A)
Online CE Allowed: No limit if APA-sponsored (Cat A)
License Expiration: 9/30, even years
National Accreditation Accepted: APA
Notes: 3 hrs ethical & legal issues required each renewal (must be Cat A)
Date of Info: 8/2/2018

North Carolina psychologists can earn all 18 hours required for renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.org (over 100 courses available) Order now and Save 20%:

North Carolina Psychologists

Click here to view APA-sponsored online CE courses.

When evaluating whether or not an activity would be acceptable for Category A, the following questions should be considered:

  1. Is the program sponsored or co-sponsored by the Board, the APA, an APA-approved sponsor, or by NC AHEC?
  2. Does the program specifically identify psychologists in the target audience?
  3. Are contact hours specified by the sponsor?
  4. Does the program meet the topic areas specified in paragraph (g) of the Rule?
  5. Does the program provide a certificate upon completion?

If a licensee can answer “Yes” to all of the above, the activity would be acceptable for Category A hours. If even one of the five questions is answered in the negative, the activity does not meet the requirements to count for Category A hours.

There are no sponsorship requirements for Category B activities; however, a psychologist must be able to show that the activity either covers ethical and legal issues in the professional practice of psychology, or assists him/her in maintaining and upgrading skills and competencies within his/her scope of practice. While it is not required that licensees complete any Category B hours (all hours may be completed in Category A activities), one may count up to nine hours of Category B credit toward the required eighteen hours total.

Course Directions

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2018

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2018Therapy Tidbits – March/April 2018 is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the March/April 2018 issue of The National Psychologist, a private, independent bi-monthly newspaper intended to keep psychologists (and other mental health professionals) informed about practice issues. The articles included in this course are:

  • Teletherapy is the Future Norm – Discusses the importance of educating oneself about teletherapy and introduces a variety of teletherapy companies.
  • ‘Housing First’ Reducing Homelessness – Introduces the book ‘Housing First’ and provides background information on the Housing First program of providing housing and support services for the homeless
  • Ethics of Technology and Clinician Responsibility – This article differentiates between the psychological testing and assessment of patients and highlights the dangers of relying on technology and the importance of the clinician’s expertise in the process.
  • Psychology Lags Behind Psychiatry in Health Integration Readiness – Provides an overview of the new initiative to train behavioral health care professionals to work in primary care practice.
  • ACA’s Likely Future Depends on Who’s Guessing – A brief update on the Affordable Care Act.
  • Consulting in Medical Settings Expands Practice – This course offers a description of a consulting liaison psychologist’s role in a medical setting and discusses the difficulties and rewards of taking on such a role.
  • Unique Peer Consultation Issues in Rural Alaska – The author highlights the need for developing connections with trusted peers, who can support the clinician living and working in a rural Alaskan community.
  • Psychotherapy and Counseling are Different – In a world where psychotherapy is declining and counseling is growing, Dr. Doane provides an important reminder of the difference between the two.
  • Therapists Vulnerable to Sexual Misconduct Accusations – This article reminds practitioners of the importance of having effective policies, practices and education in place to protect oneself against allegations of misconduct
  • ICD-11 to Include ‘Gaming Disorder’ – A brief description of ‘Gaming Disorder’ as described by The World Health Organization.

Course #11-19 | 2018 | 20 pages | 10 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

The Art of Listening

The Art of Listening

Numerous studies show that listening to music enhances mood, boosts immune response, and improves memory and concentration. But what about being listened to?

Active listening is described as fully listening and observing the speaker’s behavior and body language, and then relaying this information back to the speaker in such a way that a sense of shared meaning is arrived at.

When experiencing a sense of shared meaning, not only is there often a synchronization of the emotional experience, but also an enhanced feeling of understanding – something that is frequently lost during conflict.

In one study, it was the shared experience of gratitude that led to couples reporting that their relationships became stronger, more adaptable to change, and more positive than couples who had not shared experiences of gratitude (Kurtz & Algoe, 2015).

Another study done by researchers at the University of Chicago found that sharing the experience of watching a film together led to an emotional synchrony that increased the enjoyment of the experience (Ramanathan & McGil, 2017).

Sharing experiences profoundly improves our understanding of one another, and our enjoyment of the experience. But achieving this state requires that each person feels listened to, heard, and understood.

It is the art of active listening. In a therapeutic setting, active listening is an indispensable skill, without which clients can feel misunderstood, not validated, and not important. Moreover, accurate clinical diagnosis relies on fully understanding the client’s reality.

When the word “active” is added to “listening” it alters and amplifies the communication process to include a dynamic feedback loop in which the speaker and the listener validate that each party has been accurately heard. The result is that clients feel important, motivated and unsurprisingly, their self-esteem increases.

For the clinician, the benefits of active listening are no less important. Using active listening skills, clinicians become more confident and manage their therapy and counseling sessions with a broader and mutually respectful dialogue – and are much more likely to fully understand and synchronize with their clients.

Click here to learn more.

Active Listening: Techniques that Work for Children and ParentsActive Listening: Techniques that Work for Children and Parents is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a valuable compilation of practical and ready-to-use strategies and techniques for achieving more effective communication through active listening. One of the fundamental tools of clinicians who work effectively with children and adolescents is the art of listening. Without this set of skills, clinicians are likely to miss essential pieces of information their clients are trying to communicate to them, whether with words or with behavior. When the word “active” is added to “listening” it alters and amplifies the communication process to include a dynamic feedback loop in which the speaker and the listener validate that each party has been accurately heard.

Appropriate use of listening skills by a clinician can increase self-esteem in young clients and motivate them to learn. Using active listening skills, clinicians become more confident and manage their therapy and counseling sessions with a broader and mutually respectful dialogue. This course will teach clinicians how to employ innovative and practical communication and conversational skills in their individual and group therapy sessions with clients and their families, as well as in their working relationships with other professionals. These techniques can be applied to a wide variety of clinical, classroom and home situations, and case examples are included. Also included are sections on positive thinking and resilience, problem-solving skills, and the communication of emotion. Course #30-90 | 2017 | 70 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

This course is sponsored by Professional Development Resources, a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

New Jersey Psychologists CE Req’s

CE Information @pdresources.org

New Jersey psychologists have new continuing education (CE) requirements: Effective June 1, 2017, New Jersey psychologists are required to complete 40 hours of CE credits as a condition of their biennial license renewal.

New Jersey Board of Psychological Examiners 
CE Required: 40 credits (hours) every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: 30 hours (10 hours must be live)
License Expiration: June of odd years
National Accreditation Accepted: APA (Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.)
Notes: 4 hours Domestic Violence required each renewal
Date of Info: 10/5/2017

New Jersey psychologists can earn up to 30 hours per renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.orgClick here to view APA-sponsored online CE courses.

APA-Approved SponsorProfessional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Pennsylvania Psychologists Renewal Info

Online Continuing Education (CE) @pdresources.org

Pennsylvania psychologists can save 20% on CE for their upcoming license renewal deadline of November 30, 2017. Up to 15 of the 30 required hours per biennium are allowed from APA-sponsored online CE courses.

CE Required: 30 hours every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: 15 hours (home study)
License Expiration: 11/30, odd years
National Accreditation Accepted: APA
Notes: 3 hours in ethics required each renewal

Pennsylvania psychologists can earn up to 15 hours required for renewal through online courses offered by Professional Development Resources, and save 20% on courses. Click here to view APA-approved online CE courses.

PA Psychologists Save 20% on CE

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Over 100 courses are available!

Suicide Prevention Continuing Education (CE): On July 8, 2016, the governor of Pennsylvania signed into law the Matt Adler Suicide Prevention Continuing Education Act. This legislation requires that licensed psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors seeking to have their licenses renewed complete at least one hour of continuing education in the assessment, treatment, and management of suicide risk. To fulfill the growing requirement for suicide prevention training, Professional Development Resources created a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidence-based research and offers strategies for screening, assessment, treatment, and prevention of suicide in both adolescents and adults:

Suicide PreventionSuicide Prevention: Evidence-Based Strategies is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidence-based research and offers strategies for screening, assessment, treatment, and prevention of suicide in both adolescents and adults. Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. In 2015, 44,193 people killed themselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes, “Suicide is a serious but preventable public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities.” People who attempt suicide but do not die face potentially serious injury or disability, depending on the method used in the attempt. Depression and other mental health issues follow the suicide attempt. Family, friends, and coworkers are negatively affected by suicide. Shock, anger, guilt, and depression arise in the wake of this violent event. Even the community as a whole is affected by the loss of a productive member of society, lost wages not spent at local businesses, and medical costs. The CDC estimates that suicides result in over 44 billion dollars in work loss and medical costs. Prevention is key: reducing risk factors and promoting resilience. This course will provide a review of evidence-based studies so that healthcare professionals are informed on this complex subject. Information from the suicide prevention technical package from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be provided. Included also are strategies for screening and assessment, prevention considerations, methods of treatment, and resources for choosing evidence-based suicide prevention programs. Course #30-97 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

Online CE Courses for Psychologists:

E-Therapy: Ethics & Best Practices is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the advantages, risks, technical issues, legalities and ethics of providing therapy online. E-therapy can be used to address age-old problems, such as how to reach out to those who might not otherwise avail themselves of psychotherapy services even though they are in acute need. At the same time, it is clear that many providers have embraced the new technologies without a firm grasp on the new and serious vulnerabilities that are introduced when their patients’ personal health information goes online. Included in this course are sections on video therapy, email, text messaging, smart phone use, social media, cloud storage, Skype, and other telecommunications services. This course is focused upon the ethical principles that are called into play with the use of e-therapy. Among them the most obvious concern is for privacy and confidentiality. Yet these are not the only ethical principles that will be challenged by the increasing use of e-therapy. The others include interjurisdictional issues (crossing state lines), informed consent, competence and scope of practice, boundaries and multiple relationships, and record keeping. In addition to outlining potential ethical problems and HIPAA challenges, this course includes recommended resources and sets of specific guidelines and best practices that have been established and published by various professional organizations. Course #30-87 | 2016 | 52 pages | 20 posttest questions

Effects of Digital Media on Children’s Development and Learning is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the research on media use and offers guidance for educators and parents to regulate their children’s use of digital devices. Today’s world is filled with smartphones used by people ignoring their surroundings and even texting while driving, which is criminally dangerous. Are there other dangers that may not be as apparent? Media technology (e.g., smart phones, tablets, or laptop computers) have changed the world. Babies and children are affected and research reveals that 46% of children under age one, and up to 59% of eight-year-old children are exposed to cell phones. In England, nearly 80% of senior primary-school staff reportedly are worried about poor social skills or speech problems of children entering school, which they attribute to the use of media devices. Media technology affects family life, children’s readiness for entering school or preschool, and classroom learning. Recent research delineates a developmental progression of understanding information on devices for children between ages 2- 5 years. Younger children may believe false information if it is on a computer. This research is important for understanding technology uses in education. There are also known health risks and possible adverse effects to social-emotional development. Statistics describing the increase of media technology and developing trends in media use are presented along with guidelines and position statements developed to protect children from risks and adverse effects. Course #30-96 | 2017 | 50 pages | 20 posttest questions

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews the diagnosis, assessment and treatment strategies for OCD. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive, unwanted, and anxiety-provoking thoughts, images, impulses and rituals that are performed to alleviate the accompanying distress. Because OCD is a heterogeneous disorder with several subtypes, assessing, diagnosing, and treating it can be challenging. Further, the presentation of varying symptoms may be considered to be OC Related Disorders. Being able to make differential diagnoses and treatment recommendations are essential in clinical work with the many patients that present with the spectrum of OC problems. Specific behavioral strategies have been developed and validated in the literature that target the various manifestations of OCD and related disorders. The first part of the course offers information on the neurobiology, diagnosis and assessment tools, including the various subtypes, and highlights important topics to be taken into consideration during the process. Emotional and cognitive factors are outlined that seem to play important roles in the diagnosis and the course of episodes. The next section is dedicated to describing the clinical factors of and differential aspects of the OC Related Disorders and their prevalence. A case study follows that outlines the precipitating events, assessment, and behavioral treatment of a college student who is struggling to maintain and overcome her OCD. The final section describes effective treatment and coping strategies and augmentations that help to maintain treatment gains. Course #30-95 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

Over 100 Courses Available! Click here to learn more.

 

How to Handle a Licensing Board Complaint

Course excerpt from Therapy Tidbits – May/June 2017

Investigation Notice Not Cause for Panic –

Investigation Notice Not Cause for Panic Every state regulates the practice of psychology. The simplest regulation is that state licensing is required to call oneself a psychologist. A person may have a PhD or a PsyD, but unless the person has a license or works for an educational institution, he or she is not a psychologist.

With a state license comes board oversight to police unprofessional practices. The purpose of a licensing board is to assure that the public is not harmed.

A psychologist is considerably more likely to receive a board complaint than be sued. The reason is that in order to bring a suit there has to be a demonstrable cause of action, proof of damage to the person who wants to sue and a lawyer who is willing to take the case. It is much easier to file a complaint with the state licensing board.

Most complaints arise out of an outcome that makes the complainant feel wronged and filing a complaint is a means to validate that feeling. That does not make that person right, only angry.

The receipt of a complaint can cause anxiety in the psychologist for many reasons. Significant is the fact that most practitioners take the complaint personally and can’t see the motivation of the complainant, only that they intended to provide quality care. In reality most complaints are dismissed at the investigatory stage and there is no official record that they were even filed.

State boards deal with complaints in three phases. The opening phase is the investigatory stage. This is usually the first notice the practitioner has of a problem. A written response and a copy of the chart being sent to the board is required.

If the board thinks it is warranted, the next phase will be a formal inquiry. This can entail testimony and experts to support the complaint about the care provided. Depending on the state, this may take place at a board hearing or in front of an administrative law judge.

Some states employ another step after the administrative law judge with a formal hearing in front of the board. This process can be time consuming and expensive. This doesn’t even include an appeal to the state judicial system.

As almost all malpractice insurance policies provide some coverage for state board complaints, the first thing a policyholder should do is contact the insurance carrier. Insurers are a source of advice and, if needed, a referral to an attorney who is familiar with the complaint process. It is not advisable to try to face the board alone. Even if the complaint is frivolous, the board must take it seriously.

Many psychologists have tried self-representation and found themselves with some sort of sanction that now has to be explained. Additionally, a lot of boards invite the psychologist to sign a consent agreement to put the matter to rest. This may seem innocuous and a quick and easy means to end the matter, but it means that the practitioner has agreed that he or she has done something wrong.

With this agreement, the complainant can now sue and be fairly assured of winning. So it is very important that the practitioner understand his or her malpractice insurance coverage and feel free to contact the carrier if notified a complaint has been filed.

As with most aspects of claims against psychologists, a lot of board complaints arise out of the fractioning of a family unit – such as in a divorce – and the subsequent intervention of a psychologist. It is not unusual for a “custody evaluator” to be named in a complaint. This is the only way to bring an action against a court-appointed individual. Immunity from litigation will protect against a lawsuit but it won’t stop a board from investigating.

Most states have passed laws that allow regulatory agencies access to patient charts. There is even an exception in HIPPA that allows this. That means the board will be looking at the notes that document a course of treatment. They will be making decisions about the psychologist’s career based upon that documentation. This is another example of where the “less is more” theory of note taking breaks down.

The usual risk management strategies apply. As always, your notes are your main defense. Failure to have them just means you will have another problem. In fact, notes are the only way to survive a board complaint.

State boards are consumer protection organizations. They are there to protect the public from allegedly unqualified practitioners. It is important to recognize that a proper defense comes from a clear and documented clinical process.

So as practicing psychologists, protect yourselves by documenting your treatment of patients. If you receive notice of a complaint, don’t panic. Contact your insurance carrier and follow the advice you will be given.

By Eric. C Marine – vice president of claims and risk management for the American Professional Agency Inc. He has more than 35 years involved in the insurance claims business and more than 20 years in all facets of professional liability claims. He writes and speaks nationally on the subject.

Therapy Tidbits – May/June 2017Therapy Tidbits – May/June 2017 is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that covers a variety of therapy topics in a succinct and reader-friendly format.

The articles included in this course are:

  • Advocates in Field of Aging Hear Strong Call to Action – Highlights focus points of the ASA conference in March: critical social and political issues affecting older Americans and how the ASA is urging member support to protect them.
  • Cost-Containment Restricts Treatment for PTSD – A warzone PsyD is told her patient is receiving, “entirely too much treatment,” after reimbursement allowances by insurers fall substantially.
  • Hoffman Report Triggers Defamation Suit Against APA – Plaintiffs damaged by Hoffman Report claim bias and “blind-following” in case brought against him and numerous others alleged to be complicit in defaming.
  • Investigation Notice Not Cause for Panic – Illuminates steps you can take to prepare yourself and your practice, now and ahead of time, for the inevitable complaint.
  • Proponent of Internet Tests Contends They Eliminate Bias – Explores how the “human factor” can play a significant role in candidate deception.
  • Psychologists Best to Assess Concussions, Gender Effects – Discusses the importance of including the discipline of psychology when addressing the complex effects of concussions.
  • Brain Hacking: Tech Companies Hijack Your Attention – Focuses on the modern compulsion to keep tabs on our electronic communications and social media as well as tactics to combat such distractions.
  • Duty to Warn: Don’t Get Distracted by Legal Cases – Evaluates that laws may change, but the focus of “duty to warn” stays the same.
  • MMPI-2 Book is Excellent Reference Text – Promotes the many benefits of using the MMPI-2 as a resource material for psychology-based professions.


Course #11-10 | 2017 | 16 pages | 10 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Medicare Payments to Focus on Value not Volume

By Paula Hartman-Stein, PhD

Psychologists will have a two-year reprieve from reporting quality measures for Medicare patients beginning January 2017, according to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) that began in 2007 is being phased out in December. Although that may be a relief to those who opposed it, psychologists will also not be eligible to receive bonuses under the new system until 2021.

“Medicare is going through significant changes,” said Acting CMS Administrator Andy Slavitt during a May conference call for providers, adding, “We lived in fear of payment reduction from the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) but will its replacement be a better place?”

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), legislation that passed with bi-partisan support, repeals the SGR formula that calculated payment cuts for all providers. MACRA creates a new framework for rewarding clinicians for providing higher quality care by establishing two tracks for payment, Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Alternative Payment Models (APMs).

MIPS ScoringAccording to Slavitt, CMS released a proposed rule about the new quality performance system that is based on three principles: making the work for providers more patient-centric to support patient needs and coordinate services; more practice driven, allowing providers to select measures most appropriate for their population, and simpler to reduce duplication.

The Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) consolidates three existing quality reporting programs: PQRS, the Value-Based Payment Modifier (VBPM) and meaningful use (MU). The system also adds a new program, clinical practice improvement activities (CPIA).

MIPS is designed to change the payment structure away from volume to value as Medicare moves away from traditional fee-for-service. The four components of MIPS will determine an overall composite performance score from 1 to 100, with differing weights assigned to the factors. The components are quality (worth 50 percent), resource use (10 percent), clinical practice improvement activities (15 percent) and advancing care information (25 percent).

MIPS will impact reimbursement by assessing providers on each of the categories and assigning an overall score. Physicians whose scores fall below a predetermined threshold will receive a penalty up to 4 percent and those with scores above the threshold will be awarded a bonus up to 9 percent in 2019 based on their performance in 2017. Psychologists can begin to participate in 2019.

Exemptions from MIPS include clinicians in their first year of billing Medicare and providers whose volume of Medicare payments is less than $10,000 in claims per year and provide services to 100 or fewer Medicare patients. The bonuses may go up to 12 percent if large numbers of providers are penalized, according to CMS. Because the adjustments and bonuses are made in a budget neutral manner the money for the bonuses comes from those who are penalized.

Specific requirements for psychologists and other non-physician groups have yet to be determined. CMS encouraged psychologists to volunteer to participate in 2017 to get a head start on what will be required in the future.

The official comment period about the MIPS proposed rule ended June 27. “Psychologists should understand that if they do not report any measures under MIPS, once they become eligible they will end up with a very low composite score and should expect to see significant reductions in their Medicare payments,” according to an Information Alert from Doug Walter, associate executive director for Government Relations for the APA’s Practice Organization.

Read more in Therapy Tidbits – July/August 2016, a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that discusses a variety of psychotherapy topics.

Paula Hartman-Stein, PhD, a clinical psychologist, consultant, and Medicare correspondent for The National Psychologist newspaper, was the Chair of the first psychology and social work Expert Work Group to develop quality measures. Currently she serves on the expert panel for the Elder Maltreatment screen. Dr. Hartman-Stein graduated from Kent State University and obtained the interdisciplinary geriatric clinical development award through Case Western University. For over 20 years she has worked at the Center for Healthy Aging, a private practice in Kent, Ohio. A prolific writer, she has two edited books, Innovative Behavioral Healthcare for Older Adults (1998) and Enhancing Cognitive Fitness in Adults (2011), numerous book chapters and refereed publications on healthy aging and psychology practice issues, and over 100 news articles.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and the Office of School Psychology and is CE Broker compliant (#50-1635).

 

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Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.