Narcissism: Not All Bad?

Narcissism: Not All Bad?

It has been called an epidemic. It has been called the unintended result of the self-esteem movement. And it has been called a profound sense of grandiosity that gets in the way of relating to others. However, Dr. Craig Malkin, author of Rethinking Narcissism: The Bad – and Surprising Good – About Feeling Special, says that even given all of that, we should still be rethinking narcissism. Here are just three reasons:

We Need A Strong Sense of Self. Narcissism, although it has been the subject of many harsh invectives, is a very important part of knowing who we are. Knowing what our strengths are requires the feeling that we are good at something, which implies some level of narcissism. This is also what Malkin calls “healthy narcissism,” which helps us connect those strengths to something larger than ourselves – a way of countering the grandiosity commonly associated with narcissism.

Some Narcissism is Necessary to Succeed. Sometimes success seems unlikely, and it is precisely those times that we need the ego boost that a little narcissism offers. Narcissism, Malkin argues, can often push us over the edge, out of our comfort zone, just enough to reach those goals that we otherwise wouldn’t strive for. And it is narcissism that separates us from where we are and where we’d like to be, and plays a crucial role in promoting self-actualization – which is an essential part of psychological development.

Narcissism Helps Us Rebound. It is one thing to know where we’d like to be, and take steps to get there, but it is another thing entirely to overcome the obstacles we will inevitably face along the way. Overcoming them requires not just that we risk getting knocked down, but also that we are able to rebound when it does happen – because getting knocked down happens to everyone. And it is a little narcissism, Malkin contends, that keeps us from trying to avoid challenges, and instead helps us face them head on.

Narcissism is not all bad, and it is not something we should avoid entirely. Instead, what we should know is what healthy narcissism is and how to achieve it.

Click here to learn more.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:

Narcissism & Empathy DeficitsNarcissism & Empathy Deficits is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines narcissistic personalities and the traits that affect their ability to maintain satisfying personal relationships with others.

This course will address key ideas emerging from neuroscience about empathy and empathy deficits, because narcissism is essentially a problem of lack of empathy. Emotional intelligence, heritability, and factors thought to influence the onset of narcissism are also discussed. Diagnostic considerations for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are reviewed along with signs and symptoms, prevalence, characteristics, subtypes, comorbidity, and treatment options.

What’s more, it will help you discover constructive ways of interacting with destructive narcissistic traits, drawing on the latest international scientific research. Case examples illustrate scenarios of individuals with narcissistic personalities and show how their behavior, when left unchecked, impacts the lives and wellbeing of other people. Advice on setting interpersonal boundaries, dealing with verbal hostility, and finding ways to effectively deal with narcissists are also provided. Course #21-21 | 2018 | 35 pages | 15 posttest questions

Course Directions

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

Narcissism: A Deficit of Empathy?

Narcissism: A Deficit of Empathy?

Narcissists capture our attention with their larger-than-life presence, inflated sense of self, grandiose accomplishments, achievements, and status. But that is only one reason we can’t seem to stop focusing on them.

Narcissists also defy a fundamental principle of any relationship – reciprocity. Reciprocity is the act of responding in kind to oneanother. In a friendship, reciprocity occurs where the contribution of each person meets the expectations of the other.

The problem with narcissists is that they don’t have the empathy required to understand or respond to the needs of another person.

Part of the reason for this, suggests a study done by a team of scientists led by Privatdozent Dr. Stefan Röpke from the Charité Department of Psychiatry and Director of the personality disorders working group, is that that people suffering from narcissistic personality disorder were found to have structural abnormalities in the cerebral cortex, which is involved in the processing and generation of compassion. For patients with narcissism, this region of the cerebral cortex was markedly reduced in thickness compared to the control group (Röpke et al., 2013).

Explains Dr. Röpke, “Our data shows that the amount of empathy is directly correlated to the volume of gray brain matter of the corresponding cortical representation in the insular region, and that the patients with narcissism exhibit a structural deficit in exactly this area” (Röpke, 2013).

Research to date has also shown that narcissists’ empathy deficit, feelings of entitlement, and perceptions of being deprived of ‘deserved’ admiration and gratification can make them prone to aggression and vengeance – particularly toward heterosexual women (Keiller, 2010).

Even working for a narcissist can have detrimental effects. One study showed that those who work for leaders who display narcissistic traits had lower job satisfaction and scored higher on a clinical measure of depression. Also not only did employees’ well-being suffer, but incidents of counterproductive work behavior and workplace bullying were higher (Phillips et al, 2017).

It is not surprising then that, according to Abigail Phillips of the University of Manchester’s Business School, narcissistic bosses are also more likely to be workplace bullies and engage in power and control tactics to take advantage of others.

The good news is that there are constructive ways to interact with narcissists, set boundaries and mitigate the damage narcissists often cause to the well-being of those around them.

Click here to learn more.

Narcissism & Empathy DeficitsNarcissism & Empathy Deficits is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines narcissistic personalities and the traits that affect their ability to maintain satisfying personal relationships with others.

This course will address key ideas emerging from neuroscience about empathy and empathy deficits, because narcissism is essentially a problem of lack of empathy. Emotional intelligence, heritability, and factors thought to influence the onset of narcissism are also discussed. Diagnostic considerations for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are reviewed along with signs and symptoms, prevalence, characteristics, subtypes, comorbidity, and treatment options.

What’s more, it will help you discover constructive ways of interacting with destructive narcissistic traits, drawing on the latest international scientific research. Case examples illustrate scenarios of individuals with narcissistic personalities and show how their behavior, when left unchecked, impacts the lives and wellbeing of other people. Advice on setting interpersonal boundaries, dealing with verbal hostility, and finding ways to effectively deal with narcissists are also provided. Course #21-21 | 2018 | 35 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Narcissism – Is It All Bad?

Narcissism

A quick Google search of the word narcissism would have us concluding that having narcissism might be as bad as having say, cancer. It makes men more aggressive says one study. Another concludes that narcissistic men are more likely to rape. Yet another links narcissism to pathological behavior and mass shootings. And many more correlate narcissism with a variety of negative outcomes – everything from poor social skills to cheating on taxes.

But if we pause for a moment, the question we might ask ourselves is: What is the difference between narcissism – a trait we seem to deplore – and self-esteem – a trait we seem to covet?

After all, the polar opposite of narcissism, an excessive amount of self-esteem, would be an impoverished sense of self-esteem, which can be linked to its own set of disorders.

The truth is, defining narcissism as an all bad trait is not only simplistic, it’s also unhealthy. We can no longer eliminate the need for self-esteem as we can extinguish the need to be loved. On the contrary, we should not rid ourselves of self-esteem, we should learn to better manage it. Self-esteem should be understood as a critical driver of achievement – one of Martin Seligman’s six fundamental components of flourishing. It should also be characterized as an integral part of identity – that which helps us understand our values, motivations, and purpose.

Self-esteem gives us the confidence to try new things, set goals, and believe that achieving them is possible. It also helps us to challenge ourselves and engage fully in something that is larger than ourselves – an antidote to narcissism in itself.

Even Sigmund Freud believed that some narcissism is an essential part of all of us from birth, and Andrew Morrison claims that, in adults, a reasonable amount of healthy narcissism allows the individual’s perception of his needs to be balanced in relation to others.

The key is balance. A balance that helps us avoid an exaggerated focus on the self while still advocating for our own needs, wants, and goals. A balance that should have us re-thinking narcissism.

Related Online CE Course:

Narcissism & Empathy DeficitsNarcissism & Empathy Deficits is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines narcissistic personalities and the traits that affect their ability to maintain satisfying personal relationships with others. This course will address key ideas emerging from neuroscience about empathy and empathy deficits, because narcissism is essentially a problem of lack of empathy. Emotional intelligence, heritability, and factors thought to influence the onset of narcissism are also discussed. Diagnostic considerations for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are reviewed along with signs and symptoms, prevalence, characteristics, subtypes, comorbidity, and treatment options. What’s more, it will help you discover constructive ways of interacting with destructive narcissistic traits, drawing on the latest international scientific research. Case examples illustrate scenarios of individuals with narcissistic personalities and show how their behavior, when left unchecked, impacts the lives and wellbeing of other people. Advice on setting interpersonal boundaries, dealing with verbal hostility, and finding ways to effectively deal with narcissists are also provided. Course #21-21 | 2018 | 35 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Narcissism – New Online CE Course

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

Narcissism & Empathy DeficitsNarcissism & Empathy Deficits is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines narcissistic personalities and the traits that affect their ability to maintain satisfying personal relationships with others.

This course will address key ideas emerging from neuroscience about empathy and empathy deficits, because narcissism is essentially a problem of lack of empathy. Emotional intelligence, heritability, and factors thought to influence the onset of narcissism are also discussed.

Click here to learn more.

Diagnostic considerations for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are reviewed along with signs and symptoms, prevalence, characteristics, subtypes, comorbidity, and treatment options.

What’s more, it will help you discover constructive ways of interacting with destructive narcissistic traits, drawing on the latest international scientific research. Case examples illustrate scenarios of individuals with narcissistic personalities and show how their behavior, when left unchecked, impacts the lives and wellbeing of other people. Advice on setting interpersonal boundaries, dealing with verbal hostility, and finding ways to effectively deal with narcissists are also provided. Course #21-21 | 2018 | 35 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Click here to learn more.

The author, Jane McGregor, PhD, is a freelance researcher and author. She was an assistant professor at Nottingham University for many years but now works freelance, devoting her time to writing books about dealing with sociopathic abuse, addiction and other entrenched behaviour, and health behaviour change. She is author of Drink and the City (Nottingham University Press, 2012), co- author of The Empathy Trap: Understanding Antisocial Personalities (Sheldon Press, 2013), and Coping with Difficult Families (Sheldon Press, 2014). Her latest book is titled Coping with Aggressive Behaviour (Sheldon Press, 2017).

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Rethinking Narcissism – New CEU Course

Narcissism

What is narcissism? People hurl the word “narcissist” at anyone who offends them, and yet it seems to mean something different every time it’s uttered. The only certainty these days is that it’s bad to be a narcissist—really bad—inspiring the same kind of roiling queasiness we feel when we hear the words sexist or racist. That’s especially troubling news for millennials, the people born after 1980, who’ve been branded the “most narcissistic generation ever.”

Narcissism & Empathy DeficitsNarcissism & Empathy Deficits is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines narcissistic personalities and the traits that affect their ability to maintain satisfying personal relationships with others. This course will address key ideas emerging from neuroscience about empathy and empathy deficits, because narcissism is essentially a problem of lack of empathy. Emotional intelligence, heritability, and factors thought to influence the onset of narcissism are also discussed.

Diagnostic considerations for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are reviewed along with signs and symptoms, prevalence, characteristics, subtypes, comorbidity, and treatment options. What’s more, it will help you discover constructive ways of interacting with destructive narcissistic traits, drawing on the latest international scientific research. Case examples illustrate scenarios of individuals with narcissistic personalities and show how their behavior, when left unchecked, impacts the lives and wellbeing of other people. Advice on setting interpersonal boundaries, dealing with verbal hostility, and finding ways to effectively deal with narcissists are also provided. Course #21-21 | 2018 | 35 pages | 15 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

New CE Test Only Course on Rethinking Narcissism

 

By Dr. Craig Malkin

Rethinking NarcissismThis CE test is based on Rethinking Narcissism (HarperCollins 2015, 256 pp.), which has enjoyed international expert and critical acclaim for its exciting blend of empirical rigor, practical strategies, and compelling narrative style. In it you’ll discover:

  • A new definition of narcissism, which clarifies the connection between healthy and unhealthy narcissism.
  • A novel, empirically-derived test, which encompasses both healthy narcissism and subtler forms of unhealthy narcissism.
  • Echoism, or a lack of healthy narcissism—what it is, and how to cope with it.
  • The 3 varieties of narcissists: introverted, extroverted, and communal.
  • A 2-part, attachment-based approach for reducing narcissistic behaviors.
  • 8 evidence-based parenting strategies for promoting healthy narcissism.
  • 6 empirically informed approaches for dealing with unhealthy narcissism at work.
  • SoWe: 5 empirically grounded rules for healthy social media use.

 
Throughout, you’ll find easy-to-follow templates and concrete examples for helping people who suffer from either too much—or too little—narcissism.

Course #50-16 | 36 posttest questions

Click Here to Learn More!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Define narcissist and critique the claims of “a narcissism epidemic” using the latest research.

2. Describe the narcissism spectrum and how healthy narcissism becomes pathological.

3. Recognize and empower clients who struggle with narcissism deficits, or “echoism”.

4. Identify the defenses common to all narcissists and help them cope in healthier ways.

5. Learn evidence-based strategies to: help clients cope with narcissistic love ones; recognize dangerous narcissism sooner; and leave when necessary.

6. Help clients recognize and cope with unhealthy narcissism in the workplace, in children, and in social media, using strategies drawn from the latest research.
 
Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).