Kids Exposed to Bullying, Violence May Age Faster

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The emotional and physical scars from being bullied or exposed to other types of violence as a child may go deeper than imagined.

New research shows that the genetic material, or DNA, of children who experienced violence shows the type of wear and tear that is normally associated with advancing age.

“Children who experience extreme violence at a young age have a biological age that is much older than other children,” says researcher Idan Shalev. He is a post-doctoral researcher in psychology and neuroscience at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy in Durham, N.C.

Youth violence is widespread in the U.S. today. The CDC states that it’s the second leading cause of death among people between the ages of 10 and 24, and that nationwide, about 20% of students in grades 9-12 were bullied in 2009.

Bullied Kids Age Faster Than Others

To see whether youth violence affects vulnerability to aging, the study authors focused on telomeres, or tiny strips of genetic material that look like tails on the ends of our chromosomes; think of a cap on an end of a shoelace. Telomere shortening is an indicator of cell aging.

The researchers analyzed DNA samples from twins at ages 5 and 10 and compared telomere length to three kinds of violence: domestic violence between the mother and her partner, being bullied frequently, and physical maltreatment by an adult. Moms were also interviewed when kids were 5, 7, and 10 to create a cumulative record of exposure to violence.

Children who were exposed to cumulative violence showed accelerated telomere shortening from age 5 to age 10. What’s more, children who were exposed to multiple forms of violence had the fastest telomere shortening rate, the study shows.

“Children who experience violence appear to be aging at a faster rate,” Shalev says.

Whether or not these changes are reversible is not clear. Shalev and colleagues plan to study the children for longer periods of time to see what happens later on in life. Their findings appear in Molecular Psychiatry.

Bullying Scars Run Deep

Bullying and other violence experienced during childhood may cause a physical erosion of DNA, says Paul Thompson, PhD. He is a professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“We now have a physical record that violence during childhood could be damaging later in life,” he says. This is a “big surprise.”

Victor Fornari, MD, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y., says the new findings make perfect sense. “This article really points to a potential biological [indicator] that helps explain some of the differences in the brains of children who have experienced significant trauma and stress,” he says.

Read more: http://children.webmd.com/news/20120423/kids-exposed-bullying-violence-may-age-faster

Florida Psychology License Renewal & Continuing Education

Florida psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of May 31, 2012.

Every licensee must complete 40 hours of approved continuing psychological education (CE) within the two year licensure period (biennium) including 2 hours on the prevention of medical errors, 3 hours on ethics and Florida laws, and 2 hours on domestic violence (every third renewal).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635 – courses are automatically reported to CE Broker). Florida psychologists may earn all 40 required hours @ pdresources.org.

Questions about CE Broker? Click here for answers to FAQs.

Preventing Medical ErrorsPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. Course #20-10B | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions
Ethics and Law in Florida PsychologyEthics & Law in Florida Psychology ensures that Florida-licensed psychologists are fully aware of the ethical and legal privileges and constraints under which they are licensed to practice in the State of Florida. It provides the opportunity for a comprehensive reading of the APA Code of Ethics and the three sets of statutes and rules governing the practice of psychology in Florida. Completing this course will fulfill the requirement that licensed psychologists in Florida complete each biennial renewal period three hours of continuing education on professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Course #30-06 | 2012 | 40 pages | 21 posttest questions
domestic violenceDomestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence is intended to help health professionals maintain a high state of vigilance and to be well prepared with immediate and appropriate responses when abuse is disclosed. There is a special section on the complexity of an abuse victim’s decision about if and when to leave an abuser. This course will teach clinicians to detect abuse when they see it, screen for the particulars, and respond with definitive assistance in safety planning, community referrals, and individualized treatment plans. Course #20-61 | 2012 | 31 pages | 18 posttest questions

New Domestic Violence Online Course

 

Domestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner ViolenceDomestic violence, in the form of child abuse and intimate partner violence, remains a pervasive part of contemporary life in the U.S. Its effects are deep and far-reaching. This new 2-hour online continuing education course is intended to help health professionals maintain a high state of vigilance and to be well prepared with immediate and appropriate responses when abuse is disclosed. There is a special section on the complexity of an abuse victim’s decision about if and when to leave an abuser. This course will teach clinicians to detect abuse when they see it, screen for the particulars, and respond with definitive assistance in safety planning, community referrals, and individualized treatment plans.

This course is presented in two sections. Part I will deal with the scope, definitional concepts, dynamics, recognition, assessment, and treatment of victims of child abuse. A section on bullying is included, with consideration of a contemporary variant of bullying known as “cyber-bullying.” There is also a section addressing the question of whether abused children grow up to become abusers themselves. A strengths-based model of assessment and intervention is detailed.

Part II will cover similar aspects of intimate partner violence, including women, children, and men. Sections are included on cross cultural considerations and same gender abuse dynamics. Emphasis is on identifying victims of IPV and providing screening and intervention procedures that are intended to empower victims to take control of their own lives. There are sections on the dynamics that influence when/whether abuse victims decide to leave their abusers and how clinicians can prepare for immediate interventions as soon as a client discloses that he/she is being abused.

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Study: Child Abuse Bigger Threat than SIDS

By Frederik Joelving

Study: Child abuse bigger threat than SIDSNearly 4,600 U.S. children were hospitalized with broken bones, traumatic brain injury and other serious damage caused by physical abuse in 2006, according to a new report.

Babies younger than one were the most common victims, with 58 cases per 100,000 infants. That makes serious abuse a bigger threat to infant safety than SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, researchers say in the report.

“There is a national campaign to prevent SIDS,” said Dr. John Leventhal of Yale University, who led the new study. “We need a national campaign related to child abuse where every parent is reminded that kids can get injured.”

The new study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, is the first broad U.S. estimate of serious injuries due to child abuse.

Based on data from the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database, the last such numbers available, Leventhal’s team found that six out of every 100,000 children under 18 were hospitalized with injuries ranging from burns to wounds to brain injuries and bone fractures.

The children spent an average of one week in the hospital; 300 of them died.

The rate of abuse was highest among children under one, particularly if they were covered by Medicaid, the government’s health insurance for the poor. One out of every 752 of those infants landed in the hospital due to maltreatment.

Read more @ http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/46281207/ns/today-today_health/t/study-child-abuse-bigger-threat-sids/#.TzAWxsWJeq8

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Child Abuse Price Tag for US is $124 Billion

By MyHealthNewsDaily Staff

http://www.pdresources.org/CourseDetail.aspx?Category=AllCourses&PageNumber=1&Profession=Other&Sort=CourseID&Text=child%20abuse&courseid=1060The child abuse that takes place in one year in the United States will cost the nation $124 billion over the victims’ lifetimes, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The findings reveal the financial burden of child abuse is just as high or higher than that of costly health conditions, including Type 2 diabetes.

“No child should ever be the victim of abuse or neglect — nor do they have to be. The human and financial costs can be prevented through prevention of child maltreatment,” said Linda C. Degutis, director of CDC′s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

In 2008, there were 1,740 confirmed cases of fatal child abuse, and 579,000 nonfatal cases of child maltreatment, which include physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse and neglect, according to the report.

The cost of health care, child welfare and other services for each victim who survived their abuse will be $210,012 over the average victim’s lifetime, which is higher than the lifetime cost of stroke ($159,846 per person) and Type 2 diabetes (between $181,000 and $253,000 per person). The costs of each death due to abuse are even higher, according to the report.

Child maltreatment has been shown to have many negative effects on survivors, including poorer health, social and emotional difficulties, and decreased economic productivity. These negative effects over a survivor’s lifetime generate many costs that deleteriously affect the nation’s health care, education, criminal justice and welfare systems. Read more…

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Renewal Information for Florida Psychologists

Florida Psychologist earning CE credits online

Click to view approved online courses

Florida psychologists have a biennial license renewal deadline of May 31st (of even-numbered years). Every licensee must complete 40 hours of approved continuing psychological education (CE) within the two year licensure period (biennium) including 2 hours on the prevention of medical errors, 3 hours on ethics and Florida laws, and 2 hours on domestic violence (every third renewal).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Florida psychologists may earn all 40 required hours through coursework @ http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Psychology/AllCourses/CourseID/1/

Continuing Psychological Education Credit

As a condition of biennial licensure renewal, each licensee must complete forty (40) hours of continuing psychological education.

  • Three (3) of the forty (40) hours must be on professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Of those three hours, at least one hour shall be on professional ethics, and at least one hour shall be on Florida laws and rules relevant to the practice of psychology and shall include Chapters 456 and 490, F.S. and Rule Chapter 64B19, F.A.C.
  • Two (2) of the forty (40) hours must relate to prevention of medical errors. In addition to the study of root-cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety, the course content shall also be designed to discuss potential errors within a psychological setting, such as inadequate assessment of suicide risk, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, and failure to detect medical conditions presenting as a psychological disorder. If the course is offered by a facility licensed pursuant to Chapter 395, F.S., for its employees, the Board will approve up to one (1) hour of the two (2) hour course to be specifically related to error reduction and prevention methods used in that facility.
  • Every six years, each licensee shall complete two (2) hours of continuing psychological education on domestic violence as defined in Section 741.28, F.S.; these two (2) hours shall be part of the forty (40) hours otherwise required for each biennial licensure renewal. The licensee shall maintain documentation to substantiate timely completion of these two (2) hours and make said documentation available upon request every third biennial licensure renewal period.
  • Passage of the laws and rules examination of the Board constitutes forty (40) hours of continuing education credit, including credit for professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Passage of the laws and rules examination, however, does not satisfy the requirement for the two (2) credit hours of continuing education on domestic violence required every third biennial licensure renewal period, nor the requirement for two (2) hours relating to prevention of medical errors.

Continuing psychological education credit will be granted for:

  • Completion of graduate level courses approved for credit by sponsors approved by the American Psychological Association;
  • Completion of graduate level courses in psychology provided by a university or professional school which is regionally accredited, except that no more than ten (10) hours of continuing psychological education credit may be obtained for each semester hour;
  • Completion of a colloquium, a presentation, a workshop or a symposium offered for continuing education credit by a doctoral psychology program or an internship or residency which is part of a psychology program that is accredited by the American Psychological Association;
  • Full attendance at workshops/seminars offered by providers approved by the American Psychological Association or any of its affiliates, or providers approved by the Board. A list of Board approved providers is available from the Board office upon request;
  • Simple attendance at a state, regional or national psychology convention or conference. Only four (4) credits will be allowed each biennium regardless of how many state, regional or national conventions or conferences are attended during that biennium;
  • Attainment of diplomate status in a specialty area from the American Board of Professional Psychology, for which thirty-seven (37) continuing psychological education credits, not including the two-hour continuing education course on domestic violence required by Section 456.031(1), F.S., and the two-hour continuing education course on the prevention of medical errors required by Section 456.013(7), F.S., will be allowed only during the biennium during which the diplomate is first awarded;
  • Presenting or moderating for the first time only a continuing psychological education program sponsored by a provider approved by the Board, except that credit will be limited to the number of credits allowed by the program;
  • Each hour of attendance at a Board meeting or Board committee meeting. Only one credit will be granted for each hour of full attendance and only ten (10) credits will be allowed each biennium regardless of how many hours are attended during the biennium. Attendance at a Board or committee meeting shall also satisfy, hour by hour, the requirement of professional ethics and legal issues credit set out in subsection (3) of this rule.
  • Continuing education courses approved by any Board within the Division of Medical Quality Assurance of the Department of Health, provided that such courses enhance the psychological skills and/or psychological knowledge of the licensee.
  • The provision of volunteer expert witness opinions for cases being reviewed pursuant to laws and standards relevant to the practice of psychology. Two hours of credit shall be awarded for each case reviewed up to a maximum of ten hours per biennium. In this regard, volunteer expert witnesses are expected to perform a review of the psychological, medical, legal, and/or ethical literature, as appropriate to the case being reviewed.

No continuing psychological education credit may be earned for:

  • Regular work activities as a psychologist;
  • Membership, office in, or participation on boards or committees of professional organizations;
  • Independent, unstructured or self-structured learning;
  • Personal psychotherapy or personal growth experience;
  • Authoring or editing books or articles;
  • Obtaining or providing supervision or consultation from or under a psychologist or other professional who is not a Board approved continuing psychological education provider;
  • Home study except from providers approved by the American Psychological Association or any of its affiliates.

The licensee shall maintain, and make available upon request, documentation to substantiate continuing psychological education credit required by the Board. The licensee shall retain such documentation for two (2) years following the renewal period during which the continuing psychological education credit was required.

Florida Board of Psychology: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/psychology/

Renewal & CE Information for Florida School Psychologists

Florida School Psychologists are required to renewal their licenses biennially, on November 30th of odd-numbered years. 30 hours of continuing education are required to renew, 2 of which must be on preventing medical errors and 2 must pertain to domestic violence (every third renewal). Courses offered by APA-approved providers are accepted by the Florida Office of School Psychology and there is no limit on the number of courses that can be taken online.

Florida School Psychologists can earn all 30 hours for renewal online!

Click to view approved CE for Florida School Psychologists!

There are about 700 licensed School Psychologists in the State of Florida. They perform such services as psychoeducational assessments, interpretation of aptitude and intelligence test results, prevention or amelioration of school adjustment problems, and counseling or consultation to students, parents and teachers. They are also trained to assist in the development and implementation of sound learning environments that facilitate the psychoeducational development of students.

Florida School Psychologists are required – as part of their biennial state licensure renewal – to earn 30 hours of continuing education in areas that will enhance their knowledge and skills in their practice specialties. Of those 30 hours, two are required in the prevention of medical errors in behavioral health and two in the area of domestic violence. The latter is required before the end of every third renewal period, which – for most school psychologists – is on November 30, 2011. School psychologists are in a front-line position to detect the possibility of abuse in the children they see every day.

“One of the responsibilities we take most seriously is providing the professionals we serve with quality continuing education in domestic violence and the prevention of medical errors in behavioral health,” says Leo Christie, PhD, CEO of Professional Development Resources. “These two courses – which licensed professionals in Florida are required to take – help assure the safety of the children and families we serve. The domestic violence requirement is intended to help psychologists maintain a high state of vigilance and recognize signs of possible abuse in the children they see. Prevention of medical errors in behavioral health is largely centered around the protection of confidential information and appropriate use of psychological procedures and instruments.”

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. Course #20-10B | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions.

Domestic Violence takes many forms; including child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, and elder maltreatment. Awareness of domestic violence is essential for all professionals involved in clinical care. Identification of domestic violence and appropriate referrals can result in significant and meaningful change, including both a reduction of personal suffering and a reduction of long-term costs to society in terms of health care, legal involvement, and lost productivity. Inappropriate responses, or lack of responses, may both result in considerable harm; therefore, clinician education is fundamental to ensuring that standards of care are consistently implemented across healthcare systems. This course begins with a definition of child abuse and neglect from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), followed by fact sheets with statistics and hotline referral numbers, information on assessment and referral, links to resource pages filled with a variety of essential tools for change, and Florida-specific information regarding mandated reporting. Course #20-48 | 2010 | 187 pages | 14 posttest questions. This course meets the Florida requirements for clinician continuing education in domestic violence identification, assessment, and referral.

One of the company’s newest CE courses that will be of particular interest to school psychologists is “Reading in the Brain,” which provides a fascinating look into the brain processes that are used to identify words. It sheds a new light on dyslexia and helps clinicians develop effective literacy instruction. A second new course is “School Refusal Behavior: Children Who Can’t or Won’t Go to School.” School refusal is a problem that is stressful for children, for their families, and for school personnel. This course breaks down the distinction between truancy and a number of psychological disorders that may cause a child to refuse to go to school, providing interventions that work.

These, and other continuing education courses for school psychologists, can be viewed online at: http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Psychology/MedicalErrors/CourseID/1/bts

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635). Courses are reported to CE Broker within one week of completion.

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Renewal Information for Florida School Psychologists

florida licensed school psychologist license renewal

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Florida-licensed school psychologists must renew their licenses biennially, on November 30th of odd-numbered years.

Every licensee must complete 30 hours of approved CE within the two year licensure period (biennium). Of which:

  • Two (2) hours of continuing education on domestic violence must be completed every third biennial licensure renewal period. These two (2) hours shall be part of the 30 hours otherwise required for each biennial licensure renewal, and may be taken at anytime during the six years preceding the renewal for the biennial in which the credit is due. For example, if you renewed your license on November 30, 2005, you are required to complete the Domestic Violence CE before the November 30, 2011 renewal.
  • Two (2) of the 30 hours must relate to prevention of medical errors

More information can be found on the Florida Board of School Psychology website: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/schoolpsych/index.html

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635).

Over 100 online courses are available for psychologists, including:

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50% Off Florida Required Courses

This week only Florida Mental Health Professionals (Counselors, Social Workers & MFTs) can save 50% on the required continuing education courses for their March 31, 2011 license renewal!

Featured Online Courses:

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health – This course is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. 2010 | 2 Hours CE | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions | Course #20-10B | Regular Price: $28 – Sale Price: $14!

Ethics & Boundaries in PsychotherapyEthics & Boundaries in Psychotherapy – This course gives psychotherapists the tools they need to resolve the common ethical and boundary issues and dilemmas that they may expect to encounter in their everyday professional practice. Privacy and confidentiality, multiple relationships, conflicts of interest, self-awareness, therapy with families and couples, personal, cultural and religious values, duty to warn, duty to protect, professional accountability, supervision and peer consultation, fees and fee setting are all permeated with boundary issues. 2006 | 3 Hours CE | 43 pages | 20 posttest questions | Course #30-12 | Regular Price: $36 – Sale Price $18!

Domestic Violence – Intimate Partner ViolenceThis is a web-based course requiring an internet connection to access the required online reading materials. Course instructions provide direct links to the 6 public-access online documents. Domestic violence takes many forms, including intimate partner violence, child abuse and neglect, and elder maltreatment. Awareness of domestic violence is essential for all professionals involved in clinical care. Identification of domestic violence and appropriate referrals can result in significant and meaningful change, including both a reduction of personal suffering and a reduction of long-term costs to society in terms of health care, legal involvement, and lost productivity. Inappropriate responses, or lack of responses, may both result in considerable harm; therefore, clinician education is fundamental to ensuring that standards of care are consistently implemented across healthcare systems. This course begins with a definition of intimate partner violence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), followed by fact sheets with statistics and hotline referral numbers, information about risk and protective factors for becoming an abuser or victim, assessment measures compiled by the CDC, information on referral, links to resource pages filled with a variety of essential tools for change, and Florida-specific information regarding statistics and referral options. Course #20-47 | 2011 | 14 posttest questions | 5 page course download includes instructions, links to online reading materials, and posttest questions | Regular Price: $18 – Sale Price $9!

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC Provider #5590); by the American Psychological Association (APA); and by the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC, Provider #000279). Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (Provider #BAP346) and is CE Broker compliant.