Medical Errors Online CEU Sale

From Professional Development Resources

Save 50% on medical errors online CE courses during our Medical Errors Online CEU Sale – one week only! Required for license renewal of all Florida licensees.

Medical Errors Online CEU Event

Sale ends June 18, 2015.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

All courses are reported to CE Broker within one week of completion.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that satisfies the medical errors requirement of Florida psychologists, counselors, social workers and MFTs.

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida speech-language pathologists and audiologists.

Preventing Medical Errors & Improving Patient Safety is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida occupational therapists and other allied health care professionals.

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & Dietetics is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that addresses the impact of medical errors in the practice of nutrition and dietetics.

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition and Dietetics is a 2-hour online video course that meets the Florida requirement that dietitians and nutritionists complete a course on the prevention of medical errors each renewal.

Preventing Medical Errors in Social Media

Course excerpt from Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthYour mobile calls and texts can be (and probably are being) snooped and stored, your email can be hacked, your tweets and Facebook posts are available for all the world to see. If you consider bringing your client communications into this realm, what ethical concerns do you need to address? If the concept of privacy is not totally extinct, it is certainly on the endangered list.

All therapists, regardless of age or stage or whether we were trained in this century or another, find ourselves practicing in a digital world. Even in this early part of the 21st century, the list of digital communications applications – mobile devices, email, texting, Facebook, Twitter, Skype, cloud computing, electronic medical records, webcams, etc., etc. – is endless and still growing. As our careers progress, the proliferation of such technologies is likely to continue to challenge our capacity to stay current. With the introduction of each innovation, the threats to reasonably error-free practice will continue to multiply.

As is the case with most innovations, there are benefits and there are risks. The benefits are usually very seductive, promising increased speed, efficiency, and convenience. The risks are usually hidden, requiring thoughtful consideration before they show themselves. The point here, within the context of preventing medical errors in behavioral health, is that the use of this technology has become so routine that clinicians might adopt it mindlessly without carefully thinking through the potential consequences in therapy situations. Sometimes we may even make a conscious decision to trade security for convenience. The results can include unanticipated breeches of confidentiality or the transmission of private information to unintended parties, sometimes leading to severe damage to clients.

According to Pope and Vasquez:

“Technology creates new ways for us to connect with our patients. Geographic barriers fall. Relationships take new forms. We may start and end therapy without ever being together in the same room with the patient… But the benefits come with costs, risks, and occasional disasters. Digital technologies take confidential information that was once confined to handwriting in a paper chart kept under lock and key and spread it over electronic networks.”

Learn more:

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that satisfies the medical errors requirement of Florida mental health professionals. The course is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the many types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Breaches of Privacy and Confidentiality in Psychotherapy

Course excerpt from Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

Among the most elemental foundations of psychotherapy is the expectation that what is communicated with one’s therapist will remain private. Confidentiality violations are a major source of practice error and highly likely to cause harm to patients. There are actually three separate concepts here: privacy, confidentiality, and privileged communication.

Privacy is suggested by the 4th Amendment of the Bill of Rights (December 15, 1791) of the Constitution of the United States. Basically, it gives people the “right to secure their houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures…” (The United States Constitution). This is the most basic of the three terms (Cato Institute, 1776/2002). It is this historic and essential right that is at some risk of erosion under the problematic tenets of recent legislation like the “Patriot Act.”

Confidentiality agreementConfidentiality is an ethical term which denotes a contract between the client and the therapist in which the therapist promises to keep all utterances confidential, except those disclosures required by law. It is a principle given the most attention in almost all ethics codes and standard of care documents. According to Bernard and Goodyear (2008), this is so because confidentiality represents the essence of psychotherapy – a place where secrets and hidden fears can be disclosed. In more recent, increasingly litigious times, confidentiality has become less of a sacred trust and more of a “step-sibling to safety and judicial judgment.” Nonetheless, its role in the practice of psychotherapy has become no less central, only more complicated. Now the boundaries between the traditional therapeutic contract and considerations of legal liability must be mediated.

Privileged communication is a statutory term that refers to protecting clients from having their confidences publicly revealed during legal proceedings without their permission (Gladding et al., 2001, p. 20). Where such laws apply – and there are a large number of states where they are not legally supported – therapists are prevented from testifying in court about clients without their consent.

There are, of course, exceptions. The Florida Statutes Chapter 491 delineates the exceptions as follows:

491.0147 Confidentiality and privileged communications.–Any communication between any person licensed or certified under this chapter and her or his patient or client shall be confidential. This secrecy may be waived under the following conditions:

(1) When the person licensed or certified under this chapter is a party defendant to a civil, criminal, or disciplinary action arising from a complaint filed by the patient or client, in which case the waiver shall be limited to that action.

(2) When the patient or client agrees to the waiver, in writing, or, when more than one person in a family is receiving therapy, when each family member agrees to the waiver, in writing.

(3) When, in the clinical judgment of the person licensed or certified under this chapter, there is a clear and immediate probability of physical harm to the patient or client, to other individuals, or to society and the person licensed or certified under this chapter communicates the information only to the potential victim, appropriate family member, or law enforcement or other appropriate authorities. There shall be no liability on the part of, and no cause of action of any nature shall arise against, a person licensed or certified under this chapter for the disclosure of otherwise confidential communications under this subsection.

Three items are of note here. 1) Severe harm can come to clients whose therapists do not protect their privacy, ranging all the way from embarrassment to suicidal acts. 2) Harm is done to the profession when therapists demonstrate any disregard for the principles of confidentiality. 3) Confidentiality and its limits must be discussed in the first session of therapy in a competent informed consent process. Informed consent will be the topic of a detailed section later in this course.

Also relevant to a discussion of privacy and confidentiality are the areas of social media use, various forms of teletherapy, and the electronic storage and transmission of private health information. These topics will be discussed later in this course as well.

Confidentiality and HIPAA

Amidst all of the complexities of HIPAA legislation, one consideration will be briefly noted here: “routine” notes vs. “psychotherapy” notes. In short, routine notes are expected to be surrendered to outside parties and psychotherapy notes are expected to remain in the private records of the psychotherapist. Zuckerman (2009, p. 74) offers practical suggestions for sequestering sensitive therapy information that will provide more privacy protection in most cases from routine notes, which contains the nuts and bolts of a regular health care record.

Routine notes: If you mainly record the formalities of the therapy such as your interventions and the client’s responses you may feel comfortable in disclosing this to an insurer and so you have no need for records beyond the routine progress note.

Psychotherapy notes: If there is material which you believe you must record and yet you don’t want it shared with:

• The client because it is your working hypotheses and was of value only at one time. Remember, clients have no access to psychotherapy notes unless you give it
• Insurance companies or others who are not required to protect its confidentially as carefully as your profession requires you to
• Anyone else, because it is too sensitive and potentially damaging to the client or to others
• Other treaters, because they are not and will not be doing the kind of work you are with the client
• But you may want to share the information with professional students for training, or find value and meaning in these notes as you review them….

…the information should be kept in separate psychotherapy notes.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the many types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Florida Counselors, Social Workers & MFTs – License Renewal & CE Information

By Gina Ulery

Florida-licensed Mental Health Counselors, Clinical Social Workers and Marriage & Family Therapists (MFTs) have an upcoming license renewal deadline of March 31, 2015.

Online Continuing Education30 hours of continuing education (CE) are required to renew, including:

2 hours Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is required each renewal
3 hours Ethics & Boundaries in Psychotherapy is required each renewal
2 hours Domestic Violence is required every third renewal
3 hours Florida Laws and Rules is required every third renewal

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); and the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) to offer continuing education courses to counselors, social workers and MFTs and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

Florida-licensed counselors, social workers and MFTs can earn all 30 hours required for renewal through online courses available @ www.pdresources.org.

 

Improper Diagnosis is a Medical Error

Course excerpt from Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

Preventing Medical ErrorsClearly, the failure to arrive at an accurate diagnosis – or diagnoses, in many cases – can be a leading cause of error in behavioral health care. According to the introductory section of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), “Reliable diagnoses are essential for guiding treatment recommendations, identifying prevalence rates for mental health service planning, identifying patient groups for clinical and basic research, and documenting important public health information such as morbidity and mortality rates” (p. 5).

While DSM-5 is the latest effort on the part of the American Psychiatric Association, using it is not a simple matter. The introductory section of DSM-5 (p. 5) goes on to state: “Clinical training and experience are needed to use DSM in determining a diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria identify symptoms, behaviors, cognitive functions, personality traits, physical signs, syndrome combinations, and durations that require clinical expertise to differentiate from normal life variation and transient responses to stress.”

To make matters even more complex, DSM-5 recognizes that the latest formulations of mental disorders now conceptualize “many, if not most, disorders on a spectrum with closely related disorders that have shared symptoms, shared genetic and environmental risk factors, and possibly shared neural substrates… In short, we have come to recognize that the boundaries between disorders are more porous than originally perceived” (p. 6).

Porous boundaries? One example of this is the DSM-5 category autism spectrum disorder, formerly split into the DSM-IV categories of autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. DSM-5 instructs that individuals formerly diagnosed with one of those DSM-IV categories should now be given the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. There is one residual category that can be used for individuals who have “marked deficits in social communication, but whose symptoms do but otherwise meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder” (American Psychiatric Association, 2013, p. 51). That category is social (pragmatic) communication disorder.

The point here is that the failure to make an accurate diagnosis can be a significant source of error in mental health practice. Diagnosis is challenging on its own, but as time goes on and diagnostic conceptualizations change, clinicians have to engage in perpetual study and training or risk falling behind. Risk areas include inadequate familiarity with contemporary diagnostic science, failure to detect the presence of multiple pathologies, and insufficient cultural competence in caring for culturally diverse patients and families. All of these areas can be addressed by training, experience, and clinical supervision.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the many types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

By Leo Christie, PhD; Catherine Christie, PhD and Susan Mitchell, PhD

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that satisfies the medical errors requirement of Florida mental health professionals.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthWhen the Florida administrative code first mandated that licensees’ biennial continuing education requirement was to include two hours of training on the prevention of medical errors, there was a considerable amount of grumbling on the part of many licensees in the mental health field. The general sense of it was that – since we do not practice medicine – what is the relevance to our practice? The level of discontent was further amplified by the content requirement proposed by several of the Florida boards, which required specific topics to be included, topics that seemed to be more relevant to medical practice than psychotherapy practice.

Eventually, the courses offered by some accredited providers began to be more closely tailored to the needs of professionals who attend their clients’ psychological and emotional needs rather than to their medical needs. Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health was written to include all of the elements that are required for an approved medical errors course while including topics and case examples that will resonate with both novice and seasoned mental health professionals. While it remains a required course for Florida licensees and satisfies their biennial requirement, it is also intended to be of clinical interest to psychotherapists in other states who wish to increase their awareness of the ways in which clients can be harmed and the many strategies for avoiding such undesirable outcomes. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis; breaches of privacy and confidentiality; mandatory reporting requirements; managing dangerous clients; boundary violations and sexual misconduct; the informed consent process; and clinical and cultural competency. There are major new sections on psychotherapy in the digital age, including the use of social networking systems, the practice of teletherapy, and the challenges of maintaining and transmitting electronic records. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #21-03 | 2015 | 28 pages | 14 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) to mark your answers on it while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Prevention of Medical Errors

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthMedical errors continue to be a major issue in today’s health care arena. Yet it’s been over a decade since the eye opening report from the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine Report To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System (1999): revealed these statistics:

  • Approximately 50-100,000 Americans die each year from medical errors
  • Preventable medical errors cause an additional one million injuries to Americans
  • Medical errors cause more deaths than breast cancer, AIDS or even car accidents
  • 7,000 people die from medication errors alone
  • Repeat tests, disability, and death due to error cost the US $17-38 billion each year


Less dramatically publicized – but often equally damaging to clients – are those mistakes that can occur in the practice of behavioral health. Such errors generally fall into the categories of:

  • Improper diagnosis
  • Breach of confidentiality
  • Failure to maintain accurate clinical records
  • Failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws
  • Inadequate assessment of potential for violence
  • Failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa)


Such errors of omission or commission can result in lasting damage to clients just like those that occur in the medical arena. Diagnostic errors lead directly to one of two outcomes: either applying improper – and therefore ineffective and unneeded – treatment, and/or the failure to apply effective treatment. Breaches of privacy and confidentiality can precipitate a cascade of adverse events for clients, often reaching far into not only their personal lives, but even into relationship and occupational spheres.

Mental health professionals are required by several levels of ethical and legal standards to maintain accurate clinical records in order to assure continuity in the course of a client’s treatment. The failure to do so can cause harm resulting from the loss of a clear and coherent course of therapy. Failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws and inadequate assessment of potential for violence lead to obvious dangers to clients and others. Finally, confusing medical conditions with psychiatric ones can lead to damaging – even tragic –consequences for clients due to the failure to offer or refer for appropriate treatment.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health, a 2-hour online continuing education course, is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous case illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. There is a new section on preventing medical errors in the use of technology. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida Mental Health Counselors, Social Workers & MFTs.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC #5590); the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC #000279); and the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346). All courses are submitted to CE Broker within one week of completion.

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health – 2013 Update

Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health

By: Leo Christie, PhD; Catherine Christie, PhD; Susan Mitchell, PhD

CE Credit: 2 Hours

Target Audience: Florida-licensed Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers & MFTs

Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Type: Online
Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral HealthThis course is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous case illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. There is a new section on preventing medical errors in the use of technology. *This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for license renewal of Florida mental health professionals. Course #20-70 | 2013 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions
Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC#5590); the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC #000279); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001); the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA #AAUM); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA #3159); and various state licensing boards.
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12 Days of Christmas – Daily Deal #6

Our 6th day of Christmas daily deals in our 12 Days of Christmas promotion are:

Preventing Medical ErrorsPreventing Medical Errors

CE Credit: 2 Hours
Regular Price: $32
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This course addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. It satisfies the requirements of the Florida State Legislature mandating a 2-hour course relating to the prevention of medical errors as part of the licensure and renewal process for health professionals. Course #20-63 | 2011 | 30 pages | 14 posttest questions

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Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. * This course satisfies the ethics requirement for biennial relicensure for Florida mental health professionals. Course #20-64 | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions

Preventing Medical Errors in Speech-Language Pathology addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety. Multiple scenarios of real and potential errors in the practice of speech-language pathology are included, along with recommended strategies for preventing them. Evidence shows that the most effective error prevention occurs when a partnership exists among care facilities, health care professionals, and the patients they treat. Suggested strategies for preventing errors address all three elements: (1) models for changing the culture in care facilities, (2) lifelong learning for SLPs that is focused on ethical, evidence-based, culturally competent practice and (3) tools for educating and empowering patients. * This course satisfies the medical errors requirement for biennial relicensure for Florida speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Course #20-66 | 2010 | 33 pages | 16 posttest questions

Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition & Dietetics addresses the impact of medical errors on today’s healthcare with a focus on root cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety in the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Real life stories, ethical considerations, health literacy and growing health consumerism are addressed. Also included are tips for distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific treatment claims and for improving communication with patients. Printable hand-outs, a glossary and online resources are provided. * This course satisfies the requirements of the Florida State Legislature mandating a 2-hour course relating to the prevention of medical errors as part of the licensure and renewal process for health professionals. Course #20-65 | 2011 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

Don’t forget to like our Facebook page to be entered in the drawing for a FREE course! Drawings held daily December 14-25.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC#5590); the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC #000279); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001); the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA #AAUM); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA #3159); and various state licensing boards.