Institute of Medicine Releases Report on Cognitive Aging

From the National Institute on Aging

Institute of Medicine releases report on cognitive agingA new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) calls for increased research on assessing and maintaining cognitive health in older adults. The report, Cognitive Aging: Progress in Understanding and Opportunities for Action, released April 14, 2015, also suggests that some interventions for healthy aging—exercise, reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and regular discussions with health professionals about medications and chronic conditions—be promoted to help maintain cognitive health. A third area of focus among the report’s 10 recommendations is aimed at the conduct and dissemination of independent reviews and guidelines for products claiming to affect cognitive health. The IOM report and its recommendations follow deliberations of a panel convened by the IOM with support from the McKnight Brain Research Foundation, AARP, the Retirement Research Foundation, the National Institute on Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of the NIH, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal was to examine the public health dimensions and state of knowledge of cognitive aging.

NIA maintains an active research portfolio in cognitive aging and provides a number of resources for the public and health care professionals in this area. Among these are:

  • Understanding Memory Loss: This easy-to-read booklet explains the difference between mild forgetfulness and more serious memory problems; describes the causes of memory problems and how they can be treated; and discusses how to cope with serious memory problems
  • List of Current NIA-Funded Age-Related Cognitive Decline Clinical Trials: This list of ongoing clinical trials contains links to information about trials, the trial location, and who to contact for additional information.
  • Brain Health Resource: This presentation toolkit offers current, evidence-based information and resources to facilitate conversations with older people about brain health. Designed for use at senior centers and in other community settings, it contains a PowerPoint presentation, an educator guide, handouts, and a resource list. Materials are written in plain language and explain what people can do to help keep their brains functioning best as they age.

 

Source: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/announcements/2015/04/institute-medicine-releases-report-cognitive-aging

Related Online Continuing Education (CE/CEU) Courses for Healthcare Professionals:

Biology of Aging: Research Today for a Healthier Tomorrow is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that introduces some key areas of research and looks ahead to the future, as today’s research provides the strongest hints of things to come.

Aging: The Unraveling Self is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines the biological, social, and psychological aspects of aging.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Talking with Your Older Patient: A Clinician’s Handbook

New 2-Hour Online CE Course

Talking with Your Older Patient: A Clinician’s Handbook

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Advising an older man about starting an exercise program . . . counseling a woman about the proper way to take her osteoporosis medication . . . discussing end-of-life care options with the family of a long-time older patient who is dying. These are just some examples of the complex and sensitive issues facing clinicians who treat older people. Health care providers who communicate successfully with older patients may gain their trust and cooperation, enabling everyone to work as a team to handle physical and mental health problems that might arise. Effective communication techniques, like those discussed in this handbook, can save time, increase satisfaction for both patient and practitioner, and improve the provider’s skill in managing the care of his or her patients. Ongoing communication is key to working effectively with your older patient. If a patient does not follow recommendations or starts missing appointments, explore whether or not a difficulty in communication has developed. Paying attention to communication increases the odds of greater health for your patient and satisfaction for you both.

This course provides general advice for health and mental health professionals for working with older patients, their families, and their caregivers, based on a publication from the National Institute on Aging. Topics include being aware of perceptions about health care, understanding older patients, obtaining medical histories, encouraging wellness, talking about sensitive subjects, supporting patients with chronic conditions, breaking the bad news, working with diverse older patients, working with families and caregivers, talking with patients about cognitive problems, and keeping the door open to effective communications. The booklet also includes references to other useful publications and services for the elderly that can be used for referral purposes, including hotlines for obtaining information about assistance with caregiving, daily living, finances, health, household matters, nutrition, social support, transportation, and utilities. This course is intended for clinicians who would like an introduction to the skills of communicating with the elderly, or who would like to improve the skills they already have. Course #20-60 | 2008 | 66 pages | 15 posttest questions

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify common stereotypes about aging and ways to combat ageism
  2. Identify techniques for discussing difficult issues such as cognitive problems and delivering bad news
  3. List tips for promoting wellness among elderly patients, including exercise and nutrition
  4. Describe strategies for supporting patients with chronic conditions
  5. Identify the role of multicultural issues on patient’s attitudes towards medicine
  6. Describe important issues concerning the involvement of family and caregivers in medical discussions

About the Author(s):

The National Institute on Aging is part of the National Institutes of Health, which is part of the Federal Government. Scientists at the NIA help to improve the health of older Americans through research. The NIA provides the Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center. The Center offers many free booklets, including this guide.

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
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Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques

Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques

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Nearly every client who walks through a health professional’s door is experiencing some form of anxiety. Even if they are not seeking treatment for a specific anxiety disorder, they are likely experiencing anxiety as a side effect of other clinical issues. For this reason, a solid knowledge of anxiety management skills should be a basic component of every therapist’s repertoire. Clinicians who can teach practical anxiety management techniques have tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses. Anxiety management benefits the clinician as well, helping to maintain energy, focus, and inner peace both during and between sessions.

The purpose of this continuing education course is to offer a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools. 2007 | 41 pages | 30 posttest questions | Course #40-12

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CE Credit: 4 Hours (0.4 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychology Counseling Social-Work Occupational-Therapy Marriage-and-Family
Learning Level: Intermediate
Online Course: $56

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe two natural bodily functions that serve as powerful and basic tools for anxiety management
  2. Distinguish between the use of anxiety management techniques for prevention and intervention
  3. List and define nine basic categories of anxiety management techniques
  4. Identify at least one specific exercise in each of the nine basic categories of anxiety management techniques
  5. Name ten anxiety management techniques that employ cognitive restructuring as their base
  6. Describe two anxiety management techniques that address the specific disorders of phobia and panic attack

About the Author:

Lisa M. Schab, MSW, LCSW, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in private practice in Libertyville, Illinois. A graduate of Loyola University School of Social Work, Ms. Schab has specialized in anxiety and depression, blended families, and the treatment and prevention of eating problems and disorders. She has presented a number of professional training seminars and is the author of several books and continuing education courses, among them:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
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Multicultural Issues in Counseling

Multicultural Issues in CounselingThis is a web-based course requiring an internet connection to access the required online reading materials. Course instructions provide direct links to the free, public-access online documents and available resources. Based on thorough reviews of the research literature, the first document provides an understanding of the psychological factors underlying racism and the most effective means for counteracting racism on both personal and systemic levels. The next two documents are APA task-force reports, the first entitled Psychology Education and Training from Culture-Specific and Mulitracial Perspectives: Critical Issues and Recommendations and the second entitled Psychological Treatment of Ethnic Minority Populations. These task force reports provide specific cultural information about African-American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and multiracial populations, as well as recommendations for training and practice related to each group. This course is appropriate for any mental health professional who would like to learn more about diversity and multicultural counseling. Course #40-25 | 2010 | 40 posttest questions | 8 page course download includes instructions, links to online course materials, and posttest questions

CE Credit: 4 Hours (0.4 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, MFTs, OTs, RDs
Learning Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the psychological principles behind the formation of prejudice.
  2. Identify effective methods for changing prejudiced attitudes.
  3. Describe culturally competent education and training for conducting mental health services with African-American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian populations.
  4. Identify factors related to cultural competence when providing mental health services for African-American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian populations.

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All the documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

Accreditations:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues and Nutrition – Updated & Renewed

Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues & NutritionOne of our most popular continuing education courses, Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues & Nutrition Considerations, was recently updated and renewed by the continuing education board of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). ASHA credit is now valid until August 21, 2013!

This course details the symptoms and subtypes of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), describes developmental and behavioral issues, outlines assessment and diagnostic considerations, and briefly reviews the literature on the efficacy of various treatment approaches.

It also outlines common GI problems and feeding difficulties in autism, exploring the empirical data and/or lack thereof regarding any links between GI disorders and autism. Sections on feeding difficulties offer interventions and behavior change techniques.

A final section on nutritional considerations discusses unusual food preferences or sensitivities, growth and weight concerns, and food allergies and sensitivities with an objective look at the science and theory behind a variety of nutrition interventions.

Course #30-32 | 2010 | 45 pages | 30 posttest questions

On Sale for Only $32! (regular $42)

This course is offered for .3 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level, Professional area). ASHA credit expires 8/21/2013.

This course is also approved for Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, MFTs, Registered Dietitians and Occupational Therapists: http://www.pdresources.org/CourseDetail.aspx?Category=AllCourses&PageNumber=1&Profession=Other&Sort=CourseName&Text=30-32&courseid=947

APA Task Force Reports on Girls and Women – New Online CE Course

CE Credit: 3 Hours (0.3 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychology Counseling Social-Work Marriage-and-Family
Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Abstract:

APA Task Force Reports on Girls & WomenThis course is based on a collection of free, public-access task force reports from the American Psychological Association on issues pertaining to women. The course instructions included with this course will provide direct links to the online documents. The first report describes guidelines for psychological practice with girls and women, the second addresses the behavioral healthcare needs of rural women, and the third pertains to the sexualization of girls in the media. These reports were based on thorough reviews of the research literature, and include implications and recommendations for action. This course is appropriate for any mental health professional who works with women or girls. Course #30-51 | 2010 | 39 posttest questions

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify issues relevant to mental health practice with women and girls.
  2. Describe and apply practice guidelines for mental health treatment of women and girls.
  3. Identify mental health concerns relevant to rural women.
  4. Describe the sexualization of girls in the media, the impacts of these practices, and methods for counteracting the effects.

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All four documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

Wisconsin Social Work Continuing Education Requirements

Wisconsin-licensed Social Workers are required to obtain 30 hours of continuing education every 2 years for license renewal. The renewal period runs from March 1st to February 28th of odd years. A minimum of 20 hours must be in facilitated workshops, which must include 4 hours of Ethics and Boundaries. This includes workshops, in-service training, live teleconferences or web classes with an instructor and peer interaction.

Social Workers may earn up to 10 continuing education hours through self-study. Self-study includes audio programs and self-directed online classes. Ethics and Boundaries credits may not be earned through self-study classes. The Joint Board of Marriage & Family Therapy, Professional Counseling & Social Work Examining accepts self-study courses offered by ASWB-ACE approved providers.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for social workers by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program). Over 150 online and mail order home study CE courses available @ https://www.pdresources.org/Index.aspx.

Continuing Education for Psychologists

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635).

Professional Development Resources
provides home study continuing education (CE) courses in online, mail order, and test only learning formats for ultimate convenience. All courses require successful completion of an online posttest (80% or better required to pass, 3 chances to take test) to earn a certificate of completion.

The following states currently accept APA-approval of home study continuing education courses
:
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming & Washington DC

The amount of hours allowed from home study continuing education varies by state by board. You can view continuing education requirements by state by profession on Professional Development Resources’ website at: http://www.pdresources.org/CeRequirements.aspx

Many state psychology boards require continuing education on Ethics each licensing period. Professional Development Resources offers a variety of Ethics courses in their curriculum of over 150 CE courses for psychologists.

Ohio Social Workers/MFTs Can Now Earn All 30 CE Hours Through Distance Learning!

Effective July 3, 2010: Ohio-licensed Social Workers and Marriage & Family Therapists (MFTs) can now earn all 30 of their required continuing education hours through distance learning courses. This was previously limited to 15 hours (Counselors are still limited to 15 hours). “Distance Learning means a formal education process, in which instruction occurs when the students and instructor(s) are not located in the same place.” Distance learning refers to all non traditional methods of presentation (home study, online courses, etc.) except video conferencing.

Social Workers: Any course that is accredited by the ASWB will be accepted by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board for continuing social work education. If the course materials say “ACE approved” or “approved as a provider for continuing education by the ASWB,” it is acceptable.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for social workers by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program).

Counselors & MFTs: Courses must be approved by the CSWMFT Board as designated by the provider approval code. The provider approval code will begin with a prefix of a variation of these letters RCSTX followed by numbers. A (C ) in the prefix shows the program is approved for counselors, an (S ) for social workers and (T) for Marriage & Family Therapists.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for Social Workers, Counselors & MFTs by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage & Family Therapist Board (Provider #RCST100501). Courses that are approved by the Ohio CSWMFT Board have the provider code listed in the accreditation statement on the course details page.

All licensees are required to earn 3 hours of continuing education in ethics each renewal period. Professional Development Resources offers a variety of ethics courses for Social Workers, Counselors & MFTs.

Counselors holding the supervising counselor designation must complete 6 hours of supervisory training per renewal cycle.

Social Workers holding the supervising designation must complete 3 hours of supervisory training per renewal cycle.

Massachusetts Social Workers – License Renewal, CE Requirements & Audit Information

Massachusetts-licensed social workers have an upcoming license renewal deadline of September 30, 2010. As required by the Board of Registration of Social Workers, all licensees must complete the minimum number of continuing education hours specified below for his or her licensure level during each licensure period:

  • Licensed Independent Clinical Social Workers (LICSWs) – thirty (30) continuing education hours;
  • Licensed Certified Social Workers (LCSWs) – twenty (20) continuing education hours;
  • Licensed Social Workers (LSWs) – fifteen (15) continuing education hours; and
  • Licensed Social Work Associates (LSWAs) – ten (10) continuing education hours.

A continuing education course or program that has been reviewed and approved by ASWB as an Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program may be used to satisfy the continuing education requirements. There is no limit on the numer of hours earned from online or home study continuing education courses.

Continuing Education has been viewed as an integral part of the social work profession for many years now. In Massachusetts, Continuing Education has always been a requirement for the maintenance of a social work license. While most licensees agree and see the value of Continuing Education, it has become apparent recently that a reminder as to just what is required and how the Board monitors compliance, is needed.

Licensees, in order to renew their social work license, must sign a renewal form attesting under the penalties of perjury that they have completed all requirements for their license. This, of course, includes completion of Continuing Education.

It is the responsibility of the licensee to ensure not only that the course or program for which they are receiving credit is approved by a recognized entity, but also that they receive and maintain appropriate documentation of their CEUs. Documentation should be maintained for a period of not less than two licensure cycles, inclusive of the licensure period during which the course, program or activity was completed.

Continuing Education Audits are now performed after the submission of renewal forms, and may be done at any time during the two-year licensure cycle. If randomly selected for the audit, you will receive a written notification requesting that you submit documentation of your continuing education for the most recent, previous, complete licensure cycle (10/1/odd year – 10/1/odd year). If you fail to provide documentation of your Continuing Education, disciplinary action will be taken against your license. Audits are performed by ASWB and therefore if you are selected any questions about this process should initially be directed first to ASWB.

It is imperative that licensees understand the absolute necessity of continuing education completion for maintenance of their license. While the Board certainly does not look for ways to penalize social workers licensed in the Commonwealth, it is their duty as a consumer protection agency to ensure that the care and protection of the citizens of the Commonwealth is held in the highest regard. With that said, it falls to the Board to ensure licensees are following the standards of practice, which they have set forth in Massachusetts General Law 258 CMR.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for social workers by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program) and offers over 150 online and mail order home study continuing education courses on their website: http://www.pdresources.org/Index.aspx

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