Illinois SLPs License Renewal & CEUs

Illinois SLPs have an upcoming license renewal deadline of October 31, 2019. Twenty (20) hours of continuing education are required to renew:

Illinois DPR – Speech Language Pathologists & Audiologists
CE Required: 20 hours every 2 years 
Online CE Allowed: No limit if ASHA-approved (distance learning)
License Expiration: 10/31, odd years 
National Accreditation Accepted: ASHA
Date of Info: 9/11/2019

Illinois SLPs can earn all 20 hours for renewal through ASHA-approved online CEU courses @pdresources.org. Order now and enjoy 20% off all courses:

Illinois SLPs can earn all 20 hours for renewal through ASHA-approved online CEU courses @pdresources.org. Order now and enjoy 20% off all courses!

Use coupon code PDR453 at checkout to redeem. Coupon valid on all future orders thru 12/31/2019.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide online CEUs for Illinois SLPs license renewal.

Click here to view online CEUs for Illinois SLPs.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

PDR offers over 150 accredited online CE courses for healthcare professionals. 

Target AudiencePsychologistsSchool PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapists (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs), and Teachers

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!


Nutrition’s Role in Managing Depression

By LeeAnn Weintraub

Nutrition's Role in Managing DepressionWhile the holiday season is said to be bright, cheerful and merry, for people struggling with depression this can be the hardest time of the year.

Whether it is a case of “the blues” or clinical depression, seeking out support and implementing a daily routine of self-care, including balanced eating, can help you back onto the road of physical and emotional stability.

Experts point to various factors that make the holiday seasonal emotionally challenging.

First, December is a time for self-evaluation and reflection, so financial hardships, unraveling relationships and mounting piles of work can cause feelings of hopelessness.

Plus, there are the excess demands to make the holidays perfect while juggling stressful family dynamics.

People lacking social support, especially elderly people who may be isolated due to health problems and those who have recently lost a loved one, are at increased risk for depression. In fact, the National Institute of Mental Health considers depression in those 65 years and older to be a significant public health concern.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, nearly 7 percent of U.S. adults and more than 10 percent of adolescents aged 12-17 have had at least one major depressive episode in the past year.

A leading cause of mental illness, depression not only impacts the brain, but is associated with many other physical health problems.

People who suffer from depression are four times more likely to experience a heart attack and, strikingly, are four times more likely to die within the following six months after having a heart attack compared with those who are not depressed.

Depressed adolescents are twice as likely to become obese compared with non-depressed youth. A study published recently in the Journal of Affective Disorders found that weight gain in depressed adolescents is mostly a result of negative body image.

Those who perceived themselves as overweight were twice as likely to be obese one year later.

While seeking professional help is a key part to treating depression, healthful eating and nutrition can play a useful role in getting better and hopefully finding some holiday joy.

Here are some tips to get started on yourself or maybe someone you know:

  • Seek balance when enjoying holiday comfort foods. Keep portion control in mind when it comes to higher calorie holiday foods so you can eat your favorites without feeling guilty or deprived.
  • Choose nonalcoholic beverages. Remember that alcohol is a depressant, so steering away from the booze at holiday gatherings can help keep your mood more stable.
  • Low vitamin D levels are linked to depression. Since a primary source of vitamin D is from sunlight exposure, it can be extra challenging to get adequate vitamin D during winter months. Go outdoors to increase your daily dose of vitamin D.
  • Choose foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These essential fats from such foods as salmon, walnuts, flax seeds and extra virgin olive oil help reduce inflammation and support brain function, including memory and mood.
  • Don’t skip breakfast. Including a balanced morning meal with protein and fiber, such as eggs and whole grain toast, can aid with mood, memory and energy levels.


Make whole foods your base. Eating plenty of nutrient-dense whole foods will help ensure you are taking in the important nutrients needed to make neurotransmitters including amino acids, vitamins, such as vitamin B12 and folic acid, and minerals, such as zinc and iron.

LeeAnn Weintraub, a registered dietitian, provides nutrition counseling and consulting to individuals, families and businesses. LeeAnn can be reached at RD@halfacup.com.

Source: http://www.dailynews.com/health/20151130/nutrition-depression-issues-can-be-monitored

Related Online CEU Courses:

Nutrition in Mental Health is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses how good nutrition impacts a person’s mental health and well being.

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

World AIDS Day 2015

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

December 1 is World AIDS Day, an opportunity for people to work actively and collaboratively with partners around the world to raise awareness about HIV and help us move closer to the goal of an AIDS-free generation. This year’s theme, “The Time to Act Is Now,” calls us to act with urgency to implement the latest high-impact, evidence-based HIV prevention strategies.

Our Global Response

World AIDS Day 2015An estimated 36.9 million people are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. As a science-based public health and disease prevention agency, CDC provides support that helps more than 60 countries strengthen their national HIV/AIDS programs and build sustainable public health systems. CDC conducts these activities through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) , the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease.

Recent scientific breakthroughs now point the way to achieving an AIDS-free generation, a goal championed by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address. CDC, through PEPFAR, is working to achieve that inspiring goal through proven science, smart investments, and shared responsibility with partner countries.

Global efforts have resulted in approximately 13.5 million persons in low-income and middle-income countries receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection in 2014, an increase from 2013. Globally, more than 15 million people are on ART.

New HIV infections have fallen 35 percent since 2000, with 66 percent of the 2 million new HIV infections occurring in sub-Saharan African countries, where women account for more than half the total number of those living with HIV.

Doctor with mother and young daughter
New pediatric HIV infections have dropped by 58 percent worldwide since 2000.

CDC’s global HIV/AIDS activities are grounded in science and are critical to saving lives and preventing new infections. Core activities focus on:

  • Providing proven combination prevention interventions, including prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, antiretroviral treatment, and voluntary medical male circumcision.
  • Reaching orphans and vulnerable children, as well as other neglected and hard-to-reach populations.
  • Building and enhancing health systems, including sustainable human resources for health (e.g., health care workers) and accurate, reliable laboratory systems.


CDC’s innovative programs are helping countries collect and use more detailed data to target HIV treatment services to where they are needed most and to reduce the cost of delivering services. These activities also support greater accountability and transparency in the use of U.S. government funds. CDC works with key partners such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria —to which the United States is the largest contributor—to ensure complementary programming for maximum impact of investments.

CDC has contributed to saving millions of lives through PEPFAR. Across the globe, AIDS-related deaths have fallen by 42 percent since the peak in 2004. The increased life expectancies of people in their most productive years have helped build more secure families and bolstered fragile nations devastated by the HIV epidemic. New pediatric HIV infections have dropped by 58 percent since 2000. Worldwide, 220,000 children became newly infected with HIV in 2014, down from 520,000 in 2000. This significant achievement is due largely to evidence-based programming to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Still, millions of people around the globe are waiting for access to lifesaving antiretroviral drugs.

The United States has made an unwavering commitment to work with partner governments and other stakeholders to turn the tide on HIV/AIDS. The goal of achieving an AIDS-free generation worldwide is a shared responsibility, with partner countries in the central role.

Poster: Let’s Stop HIV Together. I am a son, a designer, and a business owner. And I am living with HIV. Kevin.
The Let’s Stop HIV Together campaign fights stigma and seeks to ensure that all Americans know the facts about HIV. Visit Act Against AIDS for campaign resources.

Our Domestic Response

Around 1.2 million people are living with HIV in the United States, and 1 in 8 don’t know it. The number of new HIV diagnoses has remained fairly stable in recent years.

More tools than ever are available to prevent HIV, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people who are at very high risk for getting HIV. Taking PrEP medicine daily can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it can reduce the risk by more than 70%. The latest edition of Vital Signs, released on November 24, 2015, provides more information on populations who could benefit from PrEP. According to the report, many people in the United States, especially many gay and bisexual men and injection drug users, are at high risk for HIV and could benefit from PrEP.

This year, the White House updated the National HIV/AIDS Strategy to 2020. On World AIDS Day, it will release a federal action plan to implement the strategy. CDC supports the strategy’s vision of a nation where new HIV infections are rare. CDC’s HIV prevention efforts in the United States target the populations most at risk and include:

  • Providing funding and technical assistance for health departments.
  • Conducting surveillance and behavioral research.
  • Developing guidelines for HIV treatment, surveillance, and laboratory procedures.
  • Evaluating programs.
  • Conducting outreach and communication campaigns through the Act Against AIDS initiative, including the campaign Let’s Stop HIV Together, which fights stigma and seeks to ensure that all Americans know the facts about HIV. Let’s Stop HIV Together includes many personal stories about living with HIV.
  • Providing training in HIV prevention and treatment.


Also, CDC, along with other agencies and organizations, will convene the 2015 National HIV Prevention Conference, December 6-9, 2015. This conference will facilitate collaboration among scientists, health care providers, community workers, and others who are working to stop the spread of HIV in the United States.

CDC continues to work with our many partners to bring the best available prevention and treatment tools to the communities that need them most, at home and around the world. On this World AIDS Day, we are pleased to join our partners to take unified action to prevent the spread of HIV.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/features/worldaidsday/

Related Online CEU Courses:

HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection, as well as strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage patients to seek and maintain medical treatment.

HIV/AIDS: Therapy and Adherence is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection and provides strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage people with HIV to seek and maintain medical treatment.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Seasonal Affective Disorder: Diet and Lifestyle Interventions

By Anne Danahy, MS, RD, LDN

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of mood disorder or depression, which occurs consistently in the fall and winter, and resolves in the spring and summer. Symptoms of SAD include:

  • Feeling sad, anxious, or “empty”
  • Irritability
  • Loss of interest in activities you usually enjoy
  • Fatigue
  • Decreased energy
  • Heavy, leaden feeling in arms or legs
  • Changes in weight, especially weight gain
  • Changes in appetite, usually an increased craving for carbohydrate foods


Risk Factors:

Seasonal Affective DisorderIt is estimated that SAD affects nearly one half million Americans each year, with women more likely to suffer from seasonal depression than men, and younger adults more at risk than older adults. Those who live furthest from the equator are more likely to experience SAD.

Research suggests that SAD is triggered by a reduction in the amount of sunlight or daylight, which upsets the body’s natural clock. A change in seasons can affect production of the hormone melatonin, which plays a part in regulating sleep and mood. Reduced exposure to sunlight can also negatively impact production of the serotonin, a neurotransmitter that affects mood.

Although diet and sedentary lifestyle are not risk factors for developing SAD, studies on depression suggest that those with diets low in certain nutrients, such as vitamin D and omega-3 fats, may be at greater risk for depression, and symptoms often improve when intake of these nutrients is increased. Additionally, individuals who eat a diet high in refined carbohydrates and/or lead a sedentary lifestyle may experience worse symptoms associated with SAD, especially weight gain, lack of energy, and fatigue.

What You Can Do:

While symptoms of SAD are generally minor for most, anyone who suffers from depression is advised to see their doctor to rule out any serious behavioral health issues. Studies have shown that light therapy (sitting next to a special light box which mimics the sun), is an effective treatment for SAD for many people. For those with more severe symptoms, your doctor may recommend an antidepressant or cognitive behavioral therapy. In addition, the following diet and lifestyle modifications may be helpful:

  • Increase your intake of omega-3 fats from salmon, sardines or other fatty fish, grass-fed beef, walnuts, flax seeds, soybeans, and enriched eggs. Omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in brain health. Although most studies examine their effect on mood disorders and other types of depression, several reviews of population studies, including those in Finland and Iceland, showed a negative association between fish eating and depression, including seasonal depression. In addition, researchers have found an association between lower plasma omega-3 levels and depression, and improvements in depression when subjects received supplemental doses.
  • Make sure you get adequate vitamin D by exposing your face and arms to sunlight for 10 minutes each day, eating fatty fish, eggs, and fortified milk, and taking a vitamin D supplement if necessary. Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and studies have found a negative association with depression. In a study that examined the effects of adding vitamin D to antidepressant treatment in subjects with major depressive disorder, researchers found that adding 1 500 international units (IU) of vitamin D to treatment was superior in treating depression. Although much research has established an association between low levels of vitamin D and higher likelihood of SAD, studies on the benefits of using vitamin D supplements alone to treat SAD have been inconsistent.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet that includes several servings of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low fat dairy foods, fish, and lean proteins. Plant foods especially have beneficial nutrients and phytochemicals that may play a role in regulating mood, body, and brain health. In a review of 21 studies that compared dietary patterns to depression, Lei et al found that individuals with low intake of fruits and vegetables had higher odds of depression. The researchers also noted that although it has been difficult to establish the role of individual nutrients in preventing or treating depression, it may be possible that the various nutrients contributed by an overall “healthy diet” act synergistically to prevent depression.
  • Choose complex carbohydrates over refined carbs. One of the symptoms of SAD is an increased craving for carbohydrate foods. Unfortunately, filling up on sweets, pasta, and other refined carbohydrate foods causes a spike in blood glucose and insulin levels, and often leads to weight gain and fatigue. In addition, research from the Women’s Health Initiative found that higher glycemic index foods actually contribute to depression, especially in postmenopausal women. Choosing more high fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates such as oatmeal, brown rice, farro, or whole-wheat pastas helps to regulate glucose levels, and supplies a steady supply of lower calorie energy throughout the day.
  • Aim for exercise most days of the week. In addition to helping to prevent winter weight gain, regular aerobic exercise, for at least 30 minutes each day has been shown to improve mood and reduce both major depression and seasonal affective disorder. Exercising outside in sunlight has been shown to have even greater benefits.


Source: http://www.nutrition411.com/articles/seasonal-affective-disorder-diet-and-lifestyle-interventions

Related Online CEU Courses:

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

Nutrition in Mental Health is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses how good nutrition impacts a person’s mental health and well being.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Why Sleep Is Even More Essential For People With Bipolar Disorder

By

Sleep: The Other Half of Bipolar MedicationDespite having lived with bipolar disorder for over twenty years, it wasn’t until my current psychiatrist and psychologist incorporated regular dialogues about sleep that I finally tuned in. My psychologist reminded me at many appointments that sleep was the other half of my medication.

And it finally stuck.

Though when I thought back to all the mental health professionals over the years, I wondered why this knowledge wasn’t ingrained in me sooner. Surely, they must have brought this up. Was I not listening? Or, had emphasis not been placed on it back then? According to PubMed a.k.a. NCBI, the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information, mania and sleep were linked. Still, those were only part of the equation, there were also circadian rhythms, our twenty-four hour clocks, to contend with.

One study showed bright light and sleep restriction acted as an antidepressant and sometimes triggered mania. WebMD stated that for three out of four people with bipolar disorder sleep problems were the most common signal a period of mania was about to occur. This is why being aware of our sleep patterns is of paramount importance though often our loved ones see it first.

After reading a fast-forward research article by Dr. Ellen Frank PhD, I tracked her down for more insight. Dr. Frank is the author of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, a distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and a member of the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center. She shared this:

Both our clinical experience and our research studies into the effects of life events on the course of bipolar disorder show the fundamental importance of sleep in maintaining wellness. Staying up all night to study for an exam or to finish a project may be perfectly safe for someone who does not have bipolar disorder, but it is extremely risky for someone who does. Likewise, people who don’t have bipolar disorder may be able to manage rotating shift work without much in the way of consequences. For someone with bipolar disorder it’s poison….like asking someone with lung disease to take a job removing asbestos.

Countless times in my early twenties I proved this to be true though unaware at that time. I was young and sleep was the last thing on my mind. One of the careers that enticed me was a flight attendant, though instinctively I knew it would not end well. Apparently, jet lag can kick off a hypomanic or manic episode.

Dr. Frank continued, “It seems that individuals who have bipolar disorder are just much more sensitive to any kind of challenge to their circadian system – the change to daylight savings time or jet lag, for example, and have much more difficulty resetting the body’s clock when it’s been challenged. That’s why it’s crucial for their sleep to be regular, at the same time each night and consistent.”
Interested in circadian rhythms, I sought out private psychiatrist Dr. Robert C. Bransfield, MD, DFAPA, PC in Middletown, NJ.

Dr. Bransfield said, “Greater amounts of light during the spring and early summer, working on computers at night, large screen TV sets and household lighting increase the light exposure to our retina and disrupts the circadian rhythm. Improving sleep can reduce the risk of a manic episode.”

This only drove home the importance of sleep, but it has been difficult, especially in times of hypomania. With each passing year though I became more vigilant , after all the dreaded “episode zone” and hospital are two places I have not enjoyed visiting.

These are some of my sleep wellness tips.

Wendy’s Sleep Tips:

  1. Try for 8-9 hours a night.The longer, the better especially if you are manic.
  2. Turn off cell phone ringer. I do use mine for alarms, but keep it silent for calls.
  3. Read rather than watch TV to fall asleep. This helps me fall asleep faster and avoids the bad habit of watching TV in the bedroom.
  4. Sleep with white or background noise. Besides the fantastic white noise machines that I swear by (on-line around $50.00) they also have free white noise apps. Air-conditioners and fans work like a charm too.
  5. Maintain consistent daily routine and sleep schedules. Aim to sleep the same hours each night, and keep your schedule steady. Although this is a struggle during times of hypomania, keep at it.
  6. Get the temperature right. If you’re too hot or too cold, you will likely flip around or have to get up to adjust the temperature.
  7. Take seasonal precautions, when necessary. During times of the year such as change of seasons, fall and spring especially, my doctor changes one medication to help me sleep. If this is your pattern, make an appointment early.
  8. Keep pets out of your bed. Of course we love them but it’s not okay if Fido or Tigger interrupt our sleep. I constantly ask myself, is it more important that my cat is happy and comfortable or that I am healthy? Resist the urge, I know it’s hard.

Remember, sleep is the other half of our medication. We are not talking counting sheep and sweet dreams, this is about our mood stabilization and staying out of the hospital. Remove any obstacles or distractions and make a pact to prioritize your wellness.

This just may one of the few advantages to having bipolar disorder. Who doesn’t love to sleep? So pull up the covers, my fellow bipolarians, tuck yourselves in and stay well!

Related Online CEU Courses:

Bipolar Disorder in Adults is a 1-hour online CEU course that provides a brief overview of the signs and symptoms, diagnostic considerations and treatment options for BPD in adults.

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD, and other therapies.

Treating Bipolar Disorder is a 6-hour CEU course that presents a powerful approach for helping people manage bipolar illness and protect against the recurrence of manic or depressive episodes.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

3 Anxiety and Panic Coping Skills

By

3 Coping Skills for Anxiety and PanicWhen we worry about an event, we focus on an imaginary threat that is not happening in reality. Below are 3 suggestions to address the reactions associated with anxiety and panic.

  1. In most cases, simply taking a few moments to practice some simple relaxation exercises, such as deep breathing, can allow your body to calm down. When we deliberately take slow deep breaths, we are indirectly telling our body that all danger has now passed; as a consequence, our body will stop producing adrenaline and our arousal will cease.To begin, place your hand on your chest. Breathe in and out of your mouth, taking a big sigh, so that you feel your chest moving in and out against your hand. This is chest breathing, a shallow form of breathing that often occurs as a response to stress. Rapid chest breathing quickly gets oxygen to the muscles so you can fight or run away from whatever is stressing you. Heart rate and blood pressure go up, and you feel anxious.Now place your hand on your stomach below your waist. Breathe in your nose like your smelling a flower. Then purse your lips and breathe out your mouth like your blowing at a match. You will feel your stomach move in and out against your hand. This is abdominal breathing or deep breathing, the kind of breathing you did naturally as a baby and still do when you’re asleep or very calm. Slow deep breathing reverses your body’s stress response of anxiety, slows the heart, reduces blood pressure so it is closer to normal and releases endorphins, your body’s natural painkillers.

    Compare how you feel after one minute of chest breathing with how you feel after one minute of abdominal breathing. Take some time to practice deep breathing every day. If you only practice your aim when your in a battle you will get shot. We need to practice before we the panic occurs.
  2. The way we think has a lot to do with the way we feel, so changing your thoughts from a fearful, pessimistic orientation to a calm, positive orientation becomes essential in managing feelings of anxiety and worry. When feeling worried, it is helpful to say the following to yourself:- This is an inconvenience and a disappointment. I have put up with disappointments all my life; I can tolerate this one too.- In order to achieve pleasant results, I may have to do unpleasant things.

    – Any solution using my adult judgment will be good enough to get the job done.
    – I cannot predict the future or prevent things from happening. I can take life as it comes.
    – I’m cooperating to get the job done as best I can.
    – I have the power of choice and can chose and live on my own terms of good enough.
    – I am no more or less loveable then anyone else.
  3. Writing our thoughts and feelings down makes them tangible and concrete before our very eyes. We cannot evaluate abstract thoughts in our mind about our life or about ourselves. However, we can begin to sort them out when we see them in black and white in front of us.To start the journaling process, it maybe useful to ask ourselves focusing questions. By answering these questions we are able to make our internalized, unconscious, unacceptable feelings, conscious and concrete. This allows us to find relief from our conflicting logical and emotional reactions, which helps us to move forward. We can begin by using some focusing questions, such as:- “What is the worst part about it?”

    – “How does that worst part make me feel?”
    – “When else have I felt this way?”
    – “What am I trying achieve?”
    – “What scares me about this?”
    – “How will this affect my life in the long term?”
    – “What would be an ideal outcome?”
    – “What advice would I give to someone else in this situation?”

Source: http://blogs.psychcentral.com/anger/2015/01/3-coping-skills-for-anxiety-and-panic/

Related Online CEU Courses:

Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses.

A Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Workbook is a 4-hour home study course that teaches how to replace stress-promoting habits with mindful ones.

Yoga as Medicine: the Yogic Prescription for Health and Healing is an 8-hour home study CEU course that will correct common misconceptions about yoga and provide a framework for understanding the conditions under which yoga may be beneficial for a variety of health and mental health issues.

Mindfulness: The Healing Power of Compassionate Presence is a 6-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides you with an excellent understanding of exactly what mindfulness is, why it works, and how to use it.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Overweight at 50 Tied to Earlier Alzheimer’s

By Amy Norton

Overweight at 50 Tied to Earlier Alzheimer'sAvoiding middle-age spread could be one way to delay the onset of dementia, a new study hints.

Researchers found that among 142 elderly adults with Alzheimer’s disease, those who were overweight at age 50 tended to develop the memory-robbing disorder earlier.

On average, the study participants were 83 years old when diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. But that age of onset varied according to people’s weight at age 50: For each unit increase in body mass index (BMI), Alzheimer’s set in about seven months earlier, on average.

Other studies have found that obesity may boost the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. But this research suggests it also speeds the onset, said senior researcher Dr. Madhav Thambisetty, of the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

“We think that’s important because one of the goals in Alzheimer’s research is to find ways to delay the onset of the disease,” Thambisetty said.

The study, published online September 1, 2015 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, does not prove that obesity, itself, hastens Alzheimer’s.

However, obese adults often have health conditions that have been linked to an increased Alzheimer’s risk, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

In the study, Thambisetty’s team did account for those conditions — plus smoking — and found that a higher BMI at age 50 was still connected to earlier Alzheimer’s onset.

What’s more, brain autopsies showed that Alzheimer’s patients who’d been heavier in middle age generally had more brain “tangles” — twisted strands of protein that build up in the brains of people with the disease.

It’s not clear, however, whether those brain abnormalities are the reason for the earlier Alzheimer’s, Thambisetty said. Plus, he noted, there were some factors that his team could not account for — such as the quality of people’s diets.

That’s important because research has suggested, for instance, that a Mediterranean diet — rich in vegetables, fruit, and “good” fats from olive oil and fish — may help stave off Alzheimer’s, according to the Institute on Aging.

There is also evidence that exercise, both physical and mental, could have a protective effect.

Still, another Alzheimer’s researcher said the bottom line is this: The same factors that affect heart health may also affect brain health.

“This study confirms that there is a bundle of risk factors for Alzheimer’s that we can modify,” said Dr. Malaz Boustani, director of the Center for Brain Care Innovation at Indiana University and a spokesman for the American Federation on Aging Research.

The study findings come from a long-term review of nearly 1,400 older adults who were free of dementia at the outset. Just over 10 percent were eventually diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

The study can’t answer the question of why higher BMI — a calculation of body fat — in middle age was linked to earlier Alzheimer’s onset or to higher levels of brain tangles, Thambisetty said.

But, it’s “plausible” that obesity, itself, contributed, he said.

Many studies, he noted, have found that obesity can cause a state of chronic inflammation in the body, including the brain. And that inflammation might worsen the brain damage seen in people with Alzheimer’s.

While questions remain, there are already many health reasons to avoid mid-life obesity, Boustani pointed out. “This study gives people yet another reason to try to reduce their BMI,” he said.

Of course, he added, losing excess weight at the age of 40 or 50 is “no walk in the park.”

Thambisetty agreed, adding that’s why preventing obesity in the first place is key.

“We know that maintaining a healthy weight throughout life is important for a variety of reasons,” he said. “This study suggests that a healthy BMI, as early as mid-life, could also help delay Alzheimer’s disease.”

Source: http://consumer.healthday.com/cognitive-health-information-26/alzheimer-s-news-20/heavier-weight-in-middle-age-tied-to-earlier-alzheimer-s-702824.html

Related Online CEU Courses:

Lewy Body Dementia: Information for Patients, Families, and Professionals is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that explains what is known about the different types of LBD and how they are diagnosed. Most importantly, it describes how to treat and manage this difficult disease, with practical advice for both people with LBD and their caregivers.

The Dementias: Hope through Research is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes specific types of dementia and how the disorders are diagnosed and treated, including drug therapy.

Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: Intensifying the Research Effort is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews basic mechanisms and risk factors of AD and details recent research findings.

Alzheimer’s: Unraveling the Mystery is a 3-hour online CEU course that describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments.

Clinician’s Guide to Understanding, Evaluating & Treating Obesity – This course is designed to help clinicians enhance their working knowledge of the etiology and treatment of obesity. Case studies will elucidate different aspects of treatment.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Managing Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s

From the Alzheimer’s Disease Education & Referral Center

Managing Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’sAlzheimer’s disease can change how a person acts over time. You may see behaviors like:

  • Getting upset, worried, and angry more easily
  • Acting depressed or not interested in things
  • Hiding things
  • Wandering


Caregivers may not be able to stop these changes, but there are ways to cope. Read about them in our tip sheet Managing Personality and Behavior Changes. This tip sheet is available to download as a PDF and an e-Book (both ePub and MOBI formats).

Share this info on social media with the following message:

#Caregivers—learn how to cope with common behavior changes in ppl w/ #Alzheimers http://1.usa.gov/1NvRy4X

Related Online CEU Courses:

Alzheimer’s Caregiver Guide and Tips on Acute Hospitalization is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers strategies for managing the everyday challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease and includes tips on acute hospitalization.

Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: Intensifying the Research Effort is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews basic mechanisms and risk factors of AD and details recent research findings.

Alzheimer’s Disease – Overview is a 1-hour online CEU course that provides an overview of the prevalence, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as information about caregiving and caregiver support.

Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease is a 3-hour online CEU course that discusses practical issues concerning caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease who has mild-to-moderate impairment, including a description of common challenges and coping strategies.

Alzheimer’s: Unraveling the Mystery is a 3-hour online CEU course that describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Picky Eating Linked to Mental Health Issues

By Tia Ghose, Senior Writer @ Live Science

Picky EaterAlmost everyone knows a 4-year-old who’s never eaten an apple, subsists off hot dogs and spaghetti or eats only white food.

But a new study suggests that such picky eating isn’t the norm, and that it may even hint at future mental health issues, in some cases. Children who are selective eaters are likelier to develop anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to the study, published August 3, 2015 in the journal Pediatrics.

It’s not clear how or why picky eating may be tied to these conditions, but it may be that children who have heightened sensory experiences overall are also more sensitive to the food they eat, the researchers at Duke University wrote in their paper.

Picky or Healthy

Pediatricians tend to shrug off parents’ fears about children who gag at eggs or shove their broccoli off their plates, saying it is just a phase that most kids will outgrow, the researchers said.

But the research team previously found that adults who are picky eaters tend to have higher rates of psychological disorders than the general public. And some studies suggest that there are a lot of adult picky eaters out there, but because they have more control over what’s on their plates than children do, they can conceal their food likes and dislikes, said Marcia Pelchat, a psychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, who was not involved in the new study.

To see whether picky eating was associated with mental health issues in children, the Duke researchers asked the parents of about 3,400 preschoolers to fill out several questionnaires about their children’s eating habits, and signs of depression, anxiety, ADHD and other psychological disorders, as well as their sensitivity to sensory experiences. About two years later, the team evaluated a subset of the little ones again.

The researchers considered the kids who only ate certain foods as having a “moderate level” of selective eating, whereas kids whose range of foods was so limited that it made it difficult for them to eat with others were considered as having “severe” selective eating. (Because so many kids avoid foods like broccoli and other cruciferous veggies, the team didn’t consider hating those foods as a sign of picky eating.)

Among all children in the study, about one-fifth had at least moderate levels of selective eating, and 3 percent of parents reported severely restricted eating. Compared with the children with no eating issues, the moderate and severe picky eaters were more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression and ADHD, both at the time of the survey and in the two-year follow-up.

Cause, Effect or Neither?

Picky Eating in Kids Tied to Anxiety, DepressionIt’s possible that picky eating causes such unpleasant mealtime battles that it increases family discord, and indirectly leads to anxiety and other mental health conditions, Pelchat said. But it’s also likely that the kids with a predisposition to anxiousness may simply have more fears surrounding food, Pelchat said.

On a subconscious level, it may be that “if you have tremendous anxiety, for example, it is threatening to put food in your mouth,” Pelchat told Live Science. Humans have an adaptive tendency to avoid eating food that tastes weird or raises anxiety — this can prevent poisoning, she said. It may be that this tendency goes further than necessary in some people.

For instance, some of the most common foods in the “reject” pile have a slimy or gelatinous texture, or textural transitions (think bread with nuts in it, or tomatoes, which have crunchy seeds, slimy insides, mealy flesh and tough skin). In humans’ evolutionary past, such textures may have been tipoffs that something was spoiled or unsafe to eat, she said.

The study authors suggest that doctors should take picky eating seriously, because it could be a marker for future mental health issues. They also suggest that doctors should intervene when parents raise the issue.

As for ways to overcome picky eating, there’s not just one method that works, Pelchat said. But there are definitely some no-nos.

“What we found — and others have kind of confirmed — is that being a short-order cook and catering to the child is not helpful,” Pelchat said. “Punishing the child does not work, and rewarding or bribing does not work.”

Instead, taking pleasure in food, worrying less about it, taking time to prepare food and getting kids involved in the effort may help kids gradually reframe their experience with food, Pelchat said.

But there’s no evidence to suggest that working to overcome such picky eating on its own will help a child with anxiety or depression, Pelchat noted.

Follow Tia Ghose on Twitterand Google+. Follow Live Science@livescience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Related Online CEU Courses:

Autism: The New Spectrum of Diagnostics, Treatment & Nutrition is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes DSM-5 diagnostic changes, assessment, intervention models, dietary modifications, nutrition considerations and other theoretical interventions.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that gives a brief update on the various facets of ADHD.

Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

Eliminating Self-Defeating Behaviors is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that teaches you how to identify, analyze and replace self-defeating behaviors with positive behaviors.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Medical Issues From Eating Disorders

By Melissa Davis @ Bulimia.com

Medical Issues From Anorexia, Bulimia and Other Eating DisordersEating disorders are complex mental health disorders that occur in many different forms, including anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder and eating disorders not otherwise specified. While each type of eating disorder has its own set of associated symptoms, all types of eating disorders have the potential to cause long-term damage to the body’s organs. Complications from the disorders, as well as co-existing mental health disorders, are wide ranging and sometimes fatal. Appropriate and prompt eating disorder treatments lead patients toward recovery, reducing the risk of medical complications and death.

Medical Issues That Arise From Anorexia

Individuals with anorexia nervosa severely restrict their food intake or engage in extreme exercise regimens in an effort to prevent weight gain or cause weight loss. According to the American Psychiatric Association, medical professionals diagnose anorexia when a patient weighs at least 15 percent less than the normal weight for the patient’s height and age. Aside from drastic weight loss, eating too little causes major nutritional deficits, denying the body many macronutrients and micronutrients it needs to function properly.

Due to severe calorie restrictions, the body does not receive adequate energy through food, and its processes slow down in order to conserve energy. According to New York Presbyterian Hospital, approximately 95 percent of patients that doctors admit to hospitals for anorexia have low heart rates. Low blood pressure and irregular heart rhythms also occur, and the risk of heart failure increases as the disease progresses. Due to changes in the endocrine system, women with anorexia often stop menstruating, and the body has a difficult time regulating its temperature.

Medical issues stemming from anorexia are not limited to the cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Bone density often decreases due to a lack of calcium and vitamin D, causing premature osteoporosis and increasing the risk of bone fractures. New York Presbyterian Hospital also highlights hematological issues, including anemia, which occurs in one-third of patients, and a low white blood cell count, which affects 50 percent of patients. Because white blood cells play a key role in immunity, a low white blood cell count increases the risk of opportunistic infections. The kidneys also suffer damage due to prolonged dehydration, and kidney failure is a possibility.

Ultimately, people suffering from anorexia risk starvation or suicide. The National Eating Disorder Association states that the mortality rate for anorexia is higher than that of any other mental illness.

Bulimia Also Causes Medical Issues

Unlike patients with anorexia, individuals with bulimia do eat, sometimes consuming thousands of calories in a single binging session. In an effort to maintain control and prevent weight gain, they then purge the food by vomiting or abusing laxatives, emetics or diuretics. This binge-and-purge cycle may happen several times per week or, in severe cases, several times per day. While individuals with bulimia are less likely to be underweight and are sometimes overweight, bulimia does cause major medical issues when left untreated. Many of the medical issues that stem from bulimia occur due to frequent vomiting. When individuals with bulimia vomit, over time, the stomach acid erodes the enamel of the teeth, leading to decay. Some individuals experience ulcers or gastroesophageal reflux disease. The esophagus becomes raw and inflamed, and forceful vomiting has the potential to rupture the esophagus. In rare cases, over-stretching the stomach causes gastric rupture, a condition in which the contents of the stomach spill into the abdominal cavity, constituting a medical emergency.

Some medical complications related to bulimia arise from the abuse of medications. Diuretic or “water pill” abuse damages the kidneys by contributing to dehydration. Laxative abuse causes gastrointestinal issues, such as irregularity and constipation. According to an article in the Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 1 to 2 percent of individuals with bulimia abuse syrup of ipecac, an over-the-counter medication that people use to induce vomiting. According to the article, this drug has toxic effects on the heart, weakening the muscle and potentially damaging the left ventricle.

Both vomiting and laxative abuse lead to electrolyte imbalances which affect the heart rate and the function of other major organs, including the kidneys. Like individuals with anorexia, people with untreated bulimia are at risk of heart failure, kidney failure and death.

Complications That Arise From Binge Eating Disorder

Like individuals with bulimia, those with binge eating disorder consume large amounts of food in a single sitting, but they do not vomit or otherwise purge the food. Because individuals with this disorder consume large amounts of fat and carbohydrates, they are often morbidly obese. The medical issues that arise due to binge eating disorder are similar to those of clinical obesity. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, individuals with binge eating disorder have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart disease. They are also at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and gallbladder disease.

Medical Issues Related to Co-Existing Psychiatric Disorders

Each of the aforementioned eating disorders often coexists with other psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Medical issues stemming from these mental health disorders range from mild, such as sleeping problems, to severe, such as suicidal behaviors.

Substance abuse and its related complications are also prevalent among those with eating disorders. The National Eating Disorder Association states that individuals with eating disorders are four times more likely to have substance abuse disorders than members of the general population. Substance abuse contributes to risky behaviors and exposes users to infectious pathogens. Compounding the problems that eating disorders cause, drugs and alcohol also damage the heart, liver and other organs. This enhances the risk of serious complications and organ failure.

The key to preventing serious medical complications related to eating disorders is prompt, appropriate treatment in an eating disorder treatment center, hospital or other qualified facility. If you are, or someone you know is, displaying symptoms of disordered eating, call us at 1-888-920-1501 to talk to a staff member about your treatment options. With the right kind of help, you or your loved one can start on the path toward recovery.

Source: http://www.bulimia.com/topics/medical-issues/

Related Online CEU Courses:

Nutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders.

Emotional Overeating: Practical Management Techniques is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that disusses the causes of emotional eating and provides cognitive and behavioral exercises that can help to eliminate the addictive pattern.

Beyond Calories & Exercise: Eliminating Self-Defeating Behaviors is a 5-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that “walks” readers through the process of replacing their self-defeating weight issues with healthy, positive, and productive life-style behaviors.

Clinician’s Guide to Understanding, Evaluating & Treating Obesity – This course is designed to help clinicians enhance their working knowledge of the etiology and treatment of obesity. Case studies will elucidate different aspects of treatment.

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.