Technology in Supervision

Course excerpt from Clinical Supervision for Healthcare Professionals

Technology in SupervisionTechnology can be a valuable asset in clinical supervision. It can also, however, detract from both treatment and supervision if the technology itself becomes the focus due to novelty – or worse to poorly functioning technology. As technology use becomes more common and the technical aspects are resolved, it may become a standard part of supervision.

The American Psychological Association recommends, “Supervisors should use live observation or audio or video review techniques whenever possible, as these are associated with enhanced supervisee and client/patient outcomes.” Memory and cognitive processing, as well as the supervisee’s biases and self-protective distortions, affect the supervisee’s self-report, making live or recorded supervision more objective and thus more effective than the supervisee’s recall of treatment (APA, 2014). Self-report is easy; there is no equipment to manage, no explanations to give the patient, and no concerns about HIPAA issues. But it is not the most effective means of supervision.

The practice setting may not have two-way mirrors or other ways to provide synchronous supervision during a therapy session. However, improved technology can provide new methods for supervision that benefit both therapists and supervisors. For example, remote access is available through teleconferencing technology. Therapists who previously had to travel to visit a supervisor can link electronically for virtual supervision. Therapy sessions can be livecast, with the supervisor providing input to the therapist via an earpiece or text. Videotaping also allows for review of a therapy session after the fact, when the therapist and supervisor have had time to mentally review the session.

Telesupervision

Telesupervision works for many disciplines. Chipcase (2014) found it effective when used in conjunction with face-to-face clinical supervision for occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists. Most therapists reported satisfaction with telesupervision as long as it was not the sole means of supervision. As expected, there are barriers to this type of supervision. Low bandwidth and erratic connectivity can make sessions difficult. Ambient noise can be an issue; multiple cameras and microphones can often compensate for audio problems. Chipcase noted that “cyclical problem solving” by supervisors and supervisees improved the learning experience.

Research has found that live video consultation increases positive client outcomes when a therapist is learning a new evidence-based treatment strategy. While phone consultation is helpful, live video consultation had a small but significant advantage over telephone-only consultation (Funderburk, 2014). Rousmaniere (2016) reports the efficacy of remote live supervision using internet videoconferencing. The supervisee could be in another part of the same building as the supervisor, or in another city. Equipment needed includes a computer, webcam, and external microphone (wired or wireless). It is important that sound quality be maximized so all conversation is clearly understood. Rousmaniere noted that this equipment would cost less than $250 total from an electronic retail store.

Most national professional organizations now approve the use of technology for supervision: telephone or video conferencing and recording, Skyping, text messaging, and other forms of technology to make the process more convenient and efficient. The American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists approves the use of technology for supervision and mentoring as long as it is secure and meets AAMFT ethical standards in their Code of Ethics. The organization says that it added technology provisions for the following reasons: “requested by members, fits contemporary standards, assists with access for distance difficulties, and enhances philosophical fit between MFT trainees and supervisors” (AAMFT, 2014).

The American Psychological Association recommends that psychotherapists be aware of and follow any relevant laws and regulations in regard to practice and technology as well as supervision and technology (APA, 2014). It is important for any technology system to meet HIPAA standards. The rewards are worth the investment of time and money. A study of pediatric mental health services found HIPAA-compliant video teleconferencing allowed direct patient care in a familiar setting for children and families in rural areas. The number of children served increased as early identification spotted children in need of services through remote screenings (Schroepfer, 2014).

  • Research carefully any technology used for client information or communication. HIPAA compliance rules may change over time, and not all companies providing technology services keep up with healthcare regulations. Videoconferencing has the highest risk. Ask for guarantees of safety for protected health information under HIPAA. If the vendor is not fluent in the latest HIPAA requirements, find another vendor (Gurung, 2015).


Telesupervision does not work for every client. Chipcase (2014) reported that therapists working with children found that many children liked the idea of being “on television.” But some patients do not understand or like technology involved in treatment sessions. Some patients will not be able to give informed consent. It is important to communicate clearly the reason telesupervision is being used. For example, “My supervisor is an expert in helping people with your diagnosis. Her feedback could be very helpful for us both.” Written consent forms should be used. The patient should have the right to decline further telesupervision activity at any time (Rousmaniere, 2016).

Likewise, not all supervisees are appropriate for remote live telesupervision. During telesupervision, the supervisee must split attention between the patient and the feedback given (via earpiece or on a screen) by the supervisor. A supervisee who is very anxious or has attention issues may have problems focusing on the session. Rousmaniere discusses the supervisee who becomes confused or lost, and then follows the supervisor’s suggestions without processing the implications for future practice. Not all supervisors are effective in telesupervision, either. Telesupervision is recommended for experienced supervisors who are comfortable using technology and can manage the divided attention required for effective supervision and client treatment.

Clinical Supervision for Healthcare ProfessionalsClinical Supervision for Healthcare Professionals is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that will outline best practices in psychotherapy supervision and review the structure of the supervisory relationship. Topics presented include developmental models of supervision, goals of the supervisory experience, ethics and risk management in the supervision process, using technology in supervision, and diversity awareness training for the supervisee. The vital and, at times, challenging relationship between supervisor and supervisee will be discussed and compared to the therapy relationship. The important topic of self-care of both the supervisee and the supervisor will be presented. A review of the type and structure of performance evaluations will be included, along with information about successful termination. Although this course is primarily written for psychotherapists, many of the essential facets of supervision apply to other disciplines such as occupational therapy and social work. Use this information to further your own competency as a clinical supervisor. Course #30-92 | 2017 | 48 pages | 20 posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychologists | Counselors | Social Workers | Occupational Therapists | Marriage & Family Therapists

Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Type: Online
Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. Our purpose is to provide high quality online continuing education (CE) courses on topics relevant to members of the healthcare professions we serve. We strive to keep our carbon footprint small by being completely paperless, allowing telecommuting, recycling, using energy-efficient lights and powering off electronics when not in use. We provide online CE courses to allow our colleagues to earn credits from the comfort of their own home or office so we can all be as green as possible (no paper, no shipping or handling, no travel expenses, etc.). Sustainability isn’t part of our work – it’s a guiding influence for all of our work.
We are approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

 

Improving Communication with Your Young Clients – New Online CE Course

By Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP

Improving Communication with Your Young Clients

3-Hour Online CE Course

Improving Communication with Your Young Clients is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that teaches clinicians effective and practical communication and conversational skills to use with young clients and their families.

Healthy professional and personal relationships rely heavily on effective communication techniques and respectful conversational skills. Clinicians and other professionals who work with children and their families can benefit from adding to their repertoire by learning communication techniques that improve the quality of these relationships. The correct use of language can increase your young clients’ self-esteem, motivate children to learn, engage their willing cooperation, defuse power struggles, and teach conflict resolution skills. With this information, you will also be better prepared to manage difficult conversations. Course #30-79 | 2015 | 52 pages | 21 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) to mark your answers on it while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

About the Author:

Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP, a certified Speech-Language Pathologist, received her master’s degree from Hunter College in New York in Communication Sciences. She is the Director of Parent Outreach for A+ Learning and Development Centers facilitating “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk” workshops as well as workshops based on “Siblings Without Rivalry.” Adina is the founder of ParentingSimply.com, a division of A+ Learning and Development Centers. You can reach her and check out her website at www.parentingsimply.com.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM); by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); by the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Communication with Elders

By: Laura More, MSW, LCSW & Edie Deane-Watson, MS, CCC, CCM

With the increasing number of older people in the United States, it is vital for healthcare professionals to communicate effectively and respectfully with elders. Effective, appropriate communication with elders is important for many reasons. For psychotherapists and other healthcare professionals, communication is the foundation of service delivery. Communication is required for assessment of the person prior to treatment. Symptoms are, after all, subjective and must be reported by the person to the clinician. Effective communication also contributes to health literacy; the person’s understanding of her condition, treatment options, and the treatment plan to be followed. A person cannot comply with a treatment program unless the program is communicated clearly enough for the person to understand it. The more effective the communication, the more effective treatment will be – and the more cost effective. Communication also helps the clinician understand the whole person: the emotional, social, and financial realities that affect response to treatment and ability to comply.

Communication with EldersCommunication with Elders is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview of aging changes that affect communication, dysfunctional communication habits to avoid, and strategies for appropriate communication with elders. 2015 | 26 pages | 15 posttest questions


This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) and mark your answers on while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

CE Information:
Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).
About the Authors:
Laura More, MSW, LCSW, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and healthcare author. She earned her Masters of Social Work from Florida State University and has over twenty years of healthcare experience, with a focus on geriatric and head injury rehabilitation. Laura has directed case management, social service, and rehabilitation in skilled nursing, outpatient and inpatient hospital settings. She has managed long-term care rehabilitation from facility, area, and regional positions, with a strong emphasis on training and education of staff and client caregivers in the provision of care for geriatric patients in skilled nursing facilities. Laura was one of the founding partners of Care2Learn, a provider of online continuing education courses for the post-acute healthcare industry. She has authored or edited over 120 online continuing education titles, co-authored evidence-based care assessment area resources and a book, The Licensed Practical Nurse in Long-term Care Field Guide. She is the recipient of the 2010 Education Award from the American College of Health Care Administrators.
Edie Deane-Watson, MS, CCC, CCM, has served in the post-acute care industry in various capacities for 25 years. She developed and managed SNF based rehabilitation programs at the facility and regional level and was one of the founding partners of Care2Learn, a provider of online continuing education courses for the post-acute healthcare industry. In addition, she has worked in acute care, head injury, life care planning, and e-learning. She is currently the Director of Education and Training at American Health Tech, a leading provider of post-acute care integrated software.

Helping Your Young Client Persevere in the Face of Learning Differences

By Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP

Helping Your Young Client Persevere in the Face of Learning DifferencesClinicians and teachers working with students struggling at grade level are committed to raising their students’ achievement potential by creating opportunities to learn. In order to accomplish this, they need to learn new techniques that can help encourage discouraged students – particularly those who have different ways of learning – by supporting and motivating them without enabling self-defeating habits.

Helping Your Young Client Persevere in the Face of Learning Differences will provide new strategies and techniques for helping students minimize the patterns of “learned helplessness” they have adopted, appreciate and maximize their strengths, develop a growth mindset, value effort and persistence over success, view mistakes as opportunities to learn, and develop a love of learning that will help them take personal responsibility for their school work. Course #30-75 | 2014 | 21 posttest questions

  • CE Credit: 3 Hours
  • Target Audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists, Marriage & Family Therapists, School Psychologists, Teachers
  • Learning Level: Introductory
  • Course Price: $57


This online video streaming course provides instant access to the course video, course handout and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account) to mark your answers on it while viewing the video. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

The Dementias: Hope through Research – New Online CE Course

By the National Institute on Aging (NIA)

The Dementias: Hope through ResearchA diagnosis of dementia can be frightening for those affected by the syndrome, their family members, and caretakers. Learning more about dementia can help. This new continuing education (CE/CEU) course provides a general overview of various types of dementia, describes how the disorders are diagnosed and treated, and offers highlights of research that is supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute on Aging, both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Click here to learn more.

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Target Audience: Psychologists | Counselors | Social Workers | Occupational Therapists | MFTs | Nutritionists & Dietitians
Learning Level: Intermediate
Course Type: Online
Cost: $19

The Basics of Dementia

Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning, which means the loss of the ability to think, remember, or reason, as well as behavioral abilities, to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Signs and symptoms of dementia result when once-healthy neurons (nerve cells) in the brain stop working, lose connections with other brain cells, and die. While everyone loses some neurons as they age, people with dementia experience far greater loss. Researchers are still trying to understand the underlying disease processes involved in the disorders.

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “Age is the primary risk factor for developing dementia. For that reason, the number of people living with dementia could double in the next 40 years with an increase in the number of Americans who are age 65 or older—from 40 million today to more than 88 million in 2050. Regardless of the form of dementia, the personal, economic, and societal demands can be devastating.”

Types of Dementia

Various disorders and factors contribute to the development of dementia. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal disorders, and Lewy body dementia result in a progressive and irreversible loss of neurons and brain functions. Currently, there are no cures for these progressive neurodegenerative disorders.

However, other types of dementia can be halted or even reversed with treatment. Normal pressure hydrocephalus, for example, often resolves when excess cerebrospinal fluid in the brain is drained via a shunt and rerouted elsewhere in the body. Cerebral vasculitis responds to aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. In rare cases, treatable infectious disorders can cause dementia. Some drugs, vitamin deficiencies, alcohol abuse, depression, and brain tumors can cause neurological deficits that resemble dementia. Most of these causes respond to treatment.

Causes of Dementia

In many cases, the causes of dementia are unknown at the present time. However, some dementias have identifiable causes such as gene mutation, head injury, Parkinson’s disease, vascular injuries, stroke, other brain diseases such as Huntington’s disease environmental factors like poisoning or substance abuse, and infectious diseases like HIV.

Risk factors include age, alcohol use, atherosclerosis, diabetes, Down syndrome, genetics, hypertension, mental illness, and smoking.

Treatment and Management

Some dementias are treatable. However, therapies to stop or slow common neurodegenerative diseases such as AD have largely been unsuccessful, though some drugs are available to manage certain symptoms. Most drugs for dementia are used to treat symptoms in AD. These drugs are sometimes used to treat other dementias as well. These drugs can temporarily improve or stabilize memory and thinking skills in some people by increasing the activity of the cholinergic brain network. They may also prevent declines in learning and memory. None of these drugs can stop or reverse the course of the disease.

This new CE course The Dementias: Hope through Research provides a general overview of dementia and specific types of dementia along with their signs and symptoms; lists risk factors that can increase a person’s chance of developing one or more kinds of dementia; describes how the disorders are diagnosed and treated, including drug therapy; and offers highlights of ongoing research.

Currently, there are no cures for the common dementias caused by progressive neurodegeneration, including AD, frontotemporal disorders, and Lewy body dementia. However, some forms of dementia are treatable. A better understanding of dementia disorders, as well as their diagnosis and treatment, will make it possible for affected individuals and their caretakers to live their lives more fully and meet daily challenges.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCCACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the CaliforniaBoard of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

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The Spectrum: A Scientifically Proven Program to Feel Better

The Spectrum: A Scientifically Proven Program to Feel BetterLifestyle changes, including diet, nutrition, exercise, yoga, and meditation, have been proven in research to have multiple beneficial effects on health, including preventing and reversing heart disease, reducing cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, encouraging weight loss, preventing and reversing type 2 diabetes, and preventing and ameliorating cancer. The Spectrum is a research-based lifestyle change program which has been proven effective for multiple health conditions. This course includes a description of the major components (nutrition, stress-management, and exercise) and mechanisms of action. Research on The Spectrum is also described. The book is accompanied by a guide to cooking, 100 easy-to-prepare recipes from award-winning chef Art Smith, and a DVD which provides instruction in meditation. By taking this course, clinicians will learn how to prevent and treat some of the most troubling illnesses of today through lifestyle changes, while avoiding the need for expensive surgery and medication. Course #40-35 | 26 posttest questions| This “test-only” CEU course is based on the book “The Spectrum: A Scientifically Proven Program to Feel Better, Live Longer, Lose Weight, and Gain Health” (2007, 387 pages). The book (or e-book) can be purchased from Amazon.

  • CE Credit: 4 Hours
  • Target Audience: Psychologists | Counselors | Social Workers | Occupational Therapists | Marriage & Family Therapists | Nutritionists & Dietetians
  • Learning Level: Introductory
  • Course Type: Test Only

 

About the Author:

Dean Ornish, MD, is the founder and president of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, CA and is clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Ornish received his medical training in internal medicine from the Baylor College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. For more than 32 years, Ornish has directed clinical research demonstrating, for the first time, that comprehensive lifestyle changes may begin to reverse even severe coronary heart disease, without drugs or surgery. He is the author of six best-selling books, including New York Times’ bestsellers Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing Heart Disease; Eat More, Weigh Less; Love & Survival; and his most recent book, The Spectrum. The research that he and his colleagues conducted has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Circulation, The New England Journal of Medicine, the American Journal of Cardiology, The Lancet Oncology, and elsewhere.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) to offer home study continuing education for NCCs (Provider #5590); by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC Provider #000279); by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); by the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635) and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); by the Illinois DPR for Social Work (#159-00531); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

CE Regulations Now in Effect for New York OTs

In February, the New York State Board of Occupational Therapy within the Department of Education published the following notice on their website:

Effective February 13, 2013, to renew your registration as an Occupational Therapist or Occupational Therapy Assistant, New York State Education Law requires completion of 36 contact hours of approved continuing competency within each three-year renewal period. However, these requirements will be phased in during the first three years, therefore, only requiring one-half hour of continuing competency for each month beginning in March 2013 through February 2016, for those registrants whose three-year renewal period falls within this time frame.

Commencing with March 2016, registrants will be required to complete the full 36 hours of continuing competency. The complete standards for continuing competency for Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapy Assistants can be found in section 76.10 of the Commissioner’s Rules and Regulations. More information regarding this requirement will be available on our website in coming months.

The AOTA State Affairs Group has been monitoring the process of proposed regulations in NY. The proposed regulations included provisions regarding the approval of sponsors, but did not specifically mention AOTA or AOTA Approved Providers. AOTA contacted the Board and filed comments.

Online CEUs for NY OTs

Online CEUs for NY OTs

Although the final regulations did not specifically add AOTA and AOTA Approved Provider to the language regarding approval of sponsors, the Board staff did provide AOTA with written communication saying that AOTA “may consider this response to be the Department’s determination that AOTA has the adequate standards for approving sponsors of continuing education required by our regulations at 8 NYCRR 76.10(i)(2)(i), and we will deem approved those sponsors that AOTA has approved for purposes of that regulation.”

So although not specifically indicated in the regulations, AOTA and AOTA Approved Providers are recognized in NY as approved sponsors of CE activities. This is a very positive outcome for AOTA Approved Providers and the more than 11,000 OT licensees and 4,000 OTA registrants regulated in NY who will have access to a wide variety of CE that is relevant to OT and recognized by the Board for their triennial licensure renewal.

Professional Development Resources is an American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) approved provider of continuing education (#3159) offering over 60 online courses for New York-licensed OTs and OTAs @ https://www.pdresources.org/profession/index/5

Occupational therapists are licensed rehabilitation care professionals who work to restore or improve physical abilities, promote behavioral changes, adapt surroundings, and teach new skills; the goal is to have the individual achieve her or his best physical and/or mental functioning in daily life tasks. Occupational therapists provide these services on the referral or prescription of a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner.

Occupational therapy assistants provide treatment according to a plan developed by or in collaboration with a licensed occupational therapist. They must work under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist or a licensed physician.

Occupational therapy practitioners help people adapt to a variety of challenges:

  • developmental disabilities
  • learning disabilities
  • job-related injuries
  • neurological problems
  • orthopedic injuries
  • birth defects
  • stroke
  • psychosocial disorders
  • chemical dependency
  • age-related disorders

 

They help with:

  • impaired physical functioning which hampers the ability to perform daily life tasks
  • psychosocial problems which hamper the ability to function in daily life
  • special needs which require modification of the physical environment and/or use of specialized equipment and technologies (e.g., changes in the home or job site for a person in a wheelchair)

 

New York Board of Occupational Therapy website: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/ot/

Renewal Information for Rhode Island OTs

Rhode Island Occupational Therapists (OTs) have an upcoming license renewal deadline of March 31, 2012.

Professional Development Resources is an AOTA approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Over 60 online courses are available at: http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Occupational-Therapy/Online/CourseID/1/

Renewal Information for Tennessee OTs

Tennessee OTs can earn up to 12 hours of continued competence online!

Click to view AOTA-approved online CEUs. Up to 12 hours allowed per renewal!

Occupational Therapists (OTs) and Occupational Therapy Assistants in Tennessee are required to demonstrate continued competence by obtaining twenty-four (24) continued competence credits in the two (2) calendar years that precede the licensure renewal year.

Continued Competence – A dynamic, multidimensional process in which an occupational therapist or an occupational therapy assistant develops and maintains the knowledge, performance skills, interpersonal abilities, critical reasoning skills, and ethical reasoning skills necessary to perform his or her professional responsibilities.

The due date for licensure renewal is the last day of the month in which a licensee’s birthday falls pursuant to the Division of Health Related Boards “birthdate renewal system” contained on the renewal certificate as the expiration date.

CONTINUED COMPETENCE

The Board shall require each licensed occupational therapist and occupational therapist assistant to participate in a minimum number of activities to promote continued competence for the two (2) calendar years (January 1-December 31) that precede the licensure renewal year (a.k.a. biennium).

Beginning January 1, 2008 all applicants for licensure, renewal of licensure, reactivation of licensure, or reinstatement of licensure must attest to having completed continued competence requirements for the two (2) calendar years (January 1-December 31) that precede the licensure renewal, reactivation or reinstatement year.

The requirements for continued competence activities are defined as planned learning experiences that occur for occupational therapists and occupational therapist assistants. Content of the experiences must relate to a licensee’s current or anticipated roles and responsibilities in occupational therapy. Qualified learning experiences may include theoretical or practical content related to the practice of occupational therapy; research; management; or the development, administration, supervision, and teaching of clinical practice or service delivery programs in occupational therapy. The purpose of this requirement is to assist in assuring safe and effective practices in the provision of occupational therapy services to the citizens of Tennessee.

Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapy Assistants are required to complete twenty-four (24) continued competence credits for the two (2) calendar years (January 1 – December 31) that precede the licensure renewal year.

  • Twelve (12) of the required twenty-four (24) continued competence credits must be directly related to the delivery of occupational therapy services.
  • One (1) hour of the required twenty-four (24) continued competence credits shall pertain to the AOTA Code of Ethics or other ethics related continued competence activities which have implications for the practice of occupational therapy.
  • One (1) hour of the required twenty-four (24) continued competence credits shall pertain to the occupational therapy portions of T.C.A. §§ 63-13-101, et seq., the Tennessee Occupational and Physical Therapy Practice Act, and shall pertain to Chapter 1150-02, General Rules Governing the Practice of Occupational Therapy.
  • Ten (10) hours of the required twenty-four (24) continued competence credits may pertain to the licensee’s current or anticipated professional role or may be directly related to the delivery of occupational therapy services.

Approved Continued Competence Activity Providers:

  • American Medical Association (AMA)
  • American Nurses Association (ANA)
  • American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and AOTA approved providers
  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
  • International Association of Continuing Education (IACET)
  • Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA)
  • Tennessee Occupational Therapy Association (TOTA)
  • State occupational therapy associations
  • State occupational therapy regulatory agencies
  • Accredited colleges and universities

The Board does not pre-approve continued competence activities. It is the responsibility of the licensed occupational therapist and occupational therapist assistant to use his/her professional judgment in determining whether or not the activities are applicable and appropriate to his/her professional development and meet the standards specified in these rules.

Each licensee must retain documentation of completion of all continued competence requirements of this rule for a period of five (5) years from when the requirements were completed. This documentation must be produced for inspection and verification, if requested in writing by the Board during its verification process.

The Tennessee Board of Occupational Therapy (http://health.state.tn.us/Boards/OT/) is responsible for safeguarding the health, safety, and welfare of Tennesseans, by requiring that all who practice occupational therapy within the state be qualified to practice. The Board interprets the laws, rules, and regulations to determine the appropriate standards of practice in an effort to ensure the highest degree of professional conduct. The Board is responsible for the investigation of alleged violations of the Practice Act and rules and is responsible for the discipline of licensees who are found guilty of such violation. Rules and regulations available: http://tennessee.gov/sos/rules/1150/1150-02.20100119.pdf

Professional Development Resources is an AOTA approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Over 100 online and home study courses are available at: http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Occupational-Therapy/AllCourses/CourseID/1/

Tennessee OTs may earn up to 12 hours per renewal through PDResources.org coursework.

Renewal Information for Illinois OTs

License Renewal & CE Requirements for Illinois Occupational Therapists (OTs)

AOTA-Approved Provider of CEUs for Illinois OTs
Professional Development Resources is an AOTA approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Over 100 online and home study continuing education courses for Illinois OTs are available @ http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Occupational-Therapy/AllCourses/CourseID/1/
Occupational therapists help patients improve their ability to perform tasks in living and working environments. They work with individuals who suffer from a mentally, physically, developmentally, or emotionally disabling condition. Occupational therapists use treatments to develop, recover, or maintain the daily living and work skills of their patients. The therapist helps clients not only to improve their basic motor functions and reasoning abilities, but also to compensate for permanent loss of function. The goal is to help clients have independent, productive, and satisfying lives.