Cyberbullying – New Online CE Course

Cyberbullying is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents, and adults.

Cyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for the identification, management, and prevention of cyberbullying.

Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. 

This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. Course #21-32 | 2019 | 40 pages | 20 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

COURSE DIRECTIONS


Cyberbullying is on online course and provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Laura More, MSW, LCSW, is a healthcare author and licensed clinical social worker. Laura was one of the founding partners of Care2Learn, a provider of online continuing education courses for the post-acute healthcare industry. She now provides healthcare authoring services. She has authored over 120 online continuing education titles, co-authored evidence-based care assessment area resources and a book, The Licensed Practical Nurse in Long-term Care Field Guide. She is the recipient of the 2010 Education Award from the American College of Health Care Administrators.

Edie Deane, MS-CCC, is a creative leader who infuses all her work with an entrepreneurial spirit. Edie’s career spans healthcare areas from hands-on service to e-business. Her portfolio of experience includes:  leadership, strategic and business development as online education company Care2Learn’s founder/owner; operations, administration, and education/training in national rehabilitation companies; and development of an e-learning department in a prominent healthcare software company. Edie currently owns ED Consulting & Coaching, focused on services for the LTPAC ecosystem. 

CE INFORMATION

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHAProvider #AAUM); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501) and the Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the TexasBoard of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Cyberbullying: What You Need To Know

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is defined as intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. Cyberbullying is also not accidental or random, and those who engage in it choose their victims carefully – those with less perceived power.

In the first large scale study of a low-tech, high-harm form of online harassment known as doxing – which involves collecting and publishing sensitive personal information to exact revenge, seek justice, or intimidate victims – researchers from the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and the University of Illinois at Chicago found that the primary motivations for cyberbullying are revenge or justice (Snyder et al., 2017).

It is perhaps not surprising then that another study done by researchers at The Pennsylvania State University found that youth cyberbullying was dramatically more likely to occur between current or former friends and dating partners than between students who were never friends or in a romantic relationship (Felmlee et al., 2017). As Diane Felmlee, a professor of sociology at Penn State explained, “The large magnitude of the effects of close relationships on the likelihood of cyberbullying, even after controlling for many other factors, was particularly surprising” (Felmlee, 2017).

The psychological effects of cyberbullying are no less concerning. Children involved in cyberbullying are much more likely to also view web content containing self-harm and suicide (Gorzig, 2016) and develop substance abuse and internet addictions (Gamez-Guadix et al., 2013). Further, a review of cyberbullying found that it has been consistently associated with an increased likelihood of depression (Hamm et al., 2015).

Cyberbullying is also increasingly common as children now have access to a wide variety of social media platforms – from Facebook and Twitter to Snapchat, websites, forums, and blogs – where communication and harassment are immediate means of imposing deliberate harm on others.

For clinicians, it almost goes without saying that cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern, and knowing how to identify it, what causes it, and what strategies can be used to prevent or manage it are essential skills in today’s social media reliant world.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Courses:

CyberbullyingCyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. Course #21-09 | 2016 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions

Stalking: Recognizing and RespondingStalking: Recognizing and Responding is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the prevalence of stalking and provides therapists with the means to identify and assist victims/survivors. Stalking is a crime that is far more prevalent and more dangerous than most people realize. It is a crime that is not well understood and that often goes unrecognized. Findings from various studies examining the prevalence of stalking suggest that community-based interventions are critical to raising awareness about this crime and promoting prevention efforts. Mental health professionals have an important role in identifying and treating victims/survivors of stalking through educating themselves about this crime. Researchers have found that stalking victims have a higher incidence of mental disorders and comorbid illnesses compared with the general population, with the most robust associations identified between stalking victimization, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder. Additionally, intimate partner stalking has been identified as a common form of IPV experienced by women veterans that strongly contributes to their risk for probable PTSD. These findings indicate that it is important to assess for these symptoms and diagnoses when working with victims/survivors of stalking. This course is designed to enhance your understanding of stalking by reviewing key findings from research on stalking, identifying common tactics used by stalkers, and exploring the intersections between stalking, intimate partner violence, and sexual violence. This course will also examine common reactions experienced by victims/survivors of stalking and discuss ways to assist victims/survivors in clinical practice. Course #11-17 | 2018 | 18 pages | 10 posttest questions

Suicide PreventionSuicide Prevention: Evidence-Based Strategies is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidence-based research and offers strategies for screening, assessment, treatment, and prevention of suicide in both adolescents and adults. Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. In 2015, 44,193 people killed themselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes, “Suicide is a serious but preventable public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities.” People who attempt suicide but do not die face potentially serious injury or disability, depending on the method used in the attempt. Depression and other mental health issues follow the suicide attempt. Family, friends, and coworkers are negatively affected by suicide. Shock, anger, guilt, and depression arise in the wake of this violent event. Even the community as a whole is affected by the loss of a productive member of society, lost wages not spent at local businesses, and medical costs. The CDC estimates that suicides result in over 44 billion dollars in work loss and medical costs. Prevention is key: reducing risk factors and promoting resilience. This course will provide a review of evidence-based studies so that healthcare professionals are informed on this complex subject. Information from the suicide prevention technical package from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be provided. Included also are strategies for screening and assessment, prevention considerations, methods of treatment, and resources for choosing evidence-based suicide prevention programs. Course #30-97 | 2017 | 60 pages | 20 posttest questions

These online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

The Anonymous World of the Internet

Course excerpt from Cyberbullying

Traditional bullying – pushing a smaller child into a locker at school, for example – can only be done in person. In the anonymous world of the internet, however, a person’s size does not matter. Everyone is the same size online. Kowalski (2014) notes that people will do things anonymously they would never do in person. The opportunity for anonymity widens the pool of potential cyberbullies. Bullies are no longer just the big kids in the class; anyone can be a cyberbully.

the anonymous world of the internet

Vandebosch (2008) found that most cyberbullies reported they worked anonymously or disguised themselves. Their victims were mostly people they knew personally. The authors state that the anonymity of the internet and mobile phones, along with technology knowledge, empowered those who otherwise would not have become bullies and might be victims of bullying themselves. The cyberbullying victim often reported that anonymous attacks were frustrating and led them to feel powerless. In fact, knowing who was behind the action made it easier to cope with the content and decide how to react. Sometimes the victim would have a clue to the bully’s identity due to writing style or the content of the message. Sometimes another person told the victim who the bully was, and sometimes the bully revealed herself to the victim.

Anonymity has the added negative effect of removing the bully’s ability to see the victim’s reaction. Sometimes seeing the reaction and knowing they have hurt the person will make the bully stop the behavior. But the cyberbully may not see a reaction, and loses the chance to feel empathy and remorse for the victim (Kowalski, 2014). This may lead to further attacks.

Click here to learn more.

Cyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. Course #21-09 | 2016 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

Effects of Cyberbullying

Course excerpt from Cyberbullying

CyberbullyCyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse (Takizawa, 2014).

Cyberbullying does not happen in a vacuum. The victim has other life events that impact emotional and social functioning. The effects of cyberbullying should be viewed in the light of other childhood adversities: abuse, neglect, family dysfunction, loss of a parent, and other life-changing events (Takizawa, 2014). Research has been able to identify patterns of effects due to cyberbullying, some of which last for a lifetime.

In a review of research on cyberbullying, Kowalski and colleagues (2014) found the effects of experiencing cyberbullying include the following:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Substance abuse
  • Decreased performance in school, absenteeism, and dropping out of school
  • Increased physical symptoms
  • Suicide


The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP, 2011) also noted that bullying could result in somatic issues such as headaches and stomach aches, as well as eating disorders, alcohol and drug use.

Barlett (2014a) found similar results, with anger, sadness, fearfulness, as well as increased aggressive behavior found in victims of cyberbullying. Kowalski also found a link between an increase in symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and anxiety related to duration of hours spent on the Internet. The authors note that the directionality of this association “clearly bears scrutiny, but the association appears robust.” It would seem that more time online would increase the person’s risk of exposure to bullying behavior, with its negative emotional consequences.

Sampasa-Kanyinga (2014) noted a reciprocal relationship between bullying victimization and depression. The authors state, “Bullying victimization can cause depression, and depressive symptoms may place some youths at increased risk for victimization.” Victims who also bully others are at a higher risk of depression (Copeland, 2013). Copeland also found bully-victims exhibited increased generalized anxiety and panic. Female bully-victims in particular were at risk for agoraphobia.

Not surprisingly, school age students may avoid school due to bullying. Many students reported skipping school due to safety concerns. Steiner (2014) found that high school students who experienced bullying in person or online were far more likely to miss school, as you can see from these results:

  • 21% of high school students bullied both in person and electronically reported missing school due to safety concerns
  • 13% of those bullied in-person only missed school
  • 11% of those bullied electronically only missed school


As a comparison, 4% of students who had not been bullied missed school due to safety concerns. Steiner notes that the results are equivalent to more than half a million of the 16 million enrolled high school students missing school days because they were afraid of being bullied at school.

The effects of childhood bullying can be felt as the victim ages. Copeland (2013) reported psychiatric symptoms in adult victims of bullying that included depression, antisocial personality disorder, anxiety, substance abuse, and suicidal ideation as well as suicide attempts. In a longitudinal study of over 7,700 people who were bullied as children, Takizawa (2014) found significant psychiatric distress in bullying victims during follow-up at ages 23 and 50. Depression, anxiety, and suicidality were increased, and were especially evident in those who were bullied frequently. Cognitive functioning was negatively affected, even after controlling for childhood IQ.

Takizawa also found that the long-lasting effects of bullying included the risk for decreased social relationships, economic difficulty, and poor quality of life. The risk was similar to children placed in foster care or who experienced multiple childhood adversities. Adults who were bullied as children were more likely to have lower educational levels and men had higher unemployment rates. These adults also had a high risk of living without a partner or spouse. They were less likely to have met with friends in the recent past, and reported fewer social supports.

It was interesting that this long-term study as well as Copeland’s (2013) results did not find a risk of alcohol dependence as a result of childhood bullying. The authors theorize that peer influence guides teens into drinking behavior. Since bullying victims are less exposed to peer influences in this way, alcohol abuse may be less of a risk.

The overall effects seen in long-term follow-up are thought to be partially a result of re-victimization. Finkelhor (2007) studied children exposed to violence and found that victimization of one type can lead to a significant risk of vulnerability to other types of victimization.

CyberbullyingCyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. Course #21-09 | 2016 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Click here to learn more

 

 
Cyberbully image created by Jcomp – Freepik.com

Cyberbullying – New ASHA-Approved 2-Hour Online CEU Course

By PDR Promotions

We have a new ASHA-approved online CEU course for you that tackles the difficult topic of Cyberbullying:

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults.

Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power.

Children with communication disorders, disabilities and/or social skills impairments are at a much higher risk for bullying, putting SLPs in a prime role for helping these children.

This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. Course #21-09 | 2016 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions | $28

We hope you enjoy the course!

Your friends @ PDR,

Gina-Ulery

Gina

Carmen-Wilson

Carmen

Cathy-Christie

Cathy

Leo-Christie

Leo

PDR-Logo

Professional Development Resources, Inc. is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) that offers 150+ online, video and book-based continuing education courses for healthcare professionals. We are approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course page for number of ASHA CEUs, instructional level and content area. ASHA CE provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures. CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the CEU Participant Form from the ASHA Approved CE Provider. Please note that the completion date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter, regardless of when the course was completed. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (Provider #50-1635) and the Ohio Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

Ten Ways to Deal With a Cyberbully

By Rich DeMuro

Ten Ways to Deal With a CyberbullyBullying is nothing new – it’s just that new online tools are giving bullies more ways to work, and many of them are anonymous.

Here are Catherine Teitelbaum’s tips, former Direct of Global Safety for Yahoo, for dealing with the situation.

1. Take a breather – Seeing negative comments and posts can be very emotional. Take a minute to cool off, regroup and gather your thoughts before doing anything.

2. Keep it 100 – You’re an awesome person! Stay true to yourself, no matter what any one else thinks. Remember that when someone is trying to knock you down.

3. Don’t drink the haterade – Sometimes bullies are just looking for a reaction. Definitely stand up for yourself, but don’t feel obligated to respond. Your lack of a response shows bullies that you’re not letting their negative comments affect you.

4. Talk it out – Show your parents, teacher or another trusted adult what posts are bothering you and discuss it with them. They can offer you the help and support needed if bullying occurs.

5. Screenshot it – Keep track of the bullying comments and posts just in case the situation escalates and you need help addressing the issue. Take screen shots or snap a pic to help you keep track.

6. Report it – Most social media networks offer reporting tools to combat bullying and other inappropriate behavior. Use those tools to report bullies – and don’t worry, reporting is almost always anonymous so the bully won’t know who reported them.

7. Block them – If you’re repeatedly being harassed by a specific person, block them from your account. Social media networks are equipped with ways to prevent bullying users from seeing, posting or commenting to your account.

8. Find your squad – Surround yourself with people who care about you. Friends, family members, even pets can play a big role in reminding you what a great person you are. Lean on them for that additional nudge of support when you’re faced with a bully (whether online or offline).

9. Kill them with kindness – Bullies are just like the rest of us, but may be missing the loving and nurturing environment that many of us enjoy. Give them a compliment or respond with a positive comment to show them they matter too.

10. Pay it forward – If you’ve ever been bullied, you know how isolating it can be. So when you see others being bullied, show them some support and stand up to the bully on their behalf.

Source: http://ktla.com/2016/01/11/what-you-need-to-know-about-cyberbullying/

Related Continuing Education Courses

Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. It will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying.

 

Children with difficult temperaments and those with developmental delays may have learned to express their dissatisfaction with challenging and defiant behavior like whining, anger, temper tantrums or bad language. They sometimes engage in negative behavior or “misbehave” because they do not have the necessary skills – communicative or otherwise – to make their needs known. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical strategies to manage challenging and defiant behavior in their young clients. The course will also focus on how clinicians can educate parents on how to manage difficult behavior and avoid power struggles at home. The dynamics and techniques described in this course are intended for use with typically functioning children and those with developmental or language delays. They are not generally adequate or even appropriate for children with serious behavior conditions like oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorders.

 

This video course starts with a thoughtful definition of “bullying” and goes on to illustrate the functional roles of the three participant groups: the targeted individuals, the bullies, and the bystanders. The speaker discusses the concepts of resiliency, empathy, and growth/fixed mindsets, and considers the pros and cons of alternative responses to harmful behavior. Included also are an examination of the utility of zero tolerance policies and a variety of adult responses when becoming aware of bullying behavior. The speaker utilizes multiple examples and scenarios to propose strategies and techniques intended to offer connection, support and reframing to targeted individuals, motivation to change in the form of progressive, escalating consequences to bullies, and multiple intervention options to bystanders. Further segments discuss ways in which schools can create safe, pro-social climates. The course video is split into 2 parts for your convenience: part 1 is 1 hour and 34 minutes and part 2 is 1 hour and 9 minutes.

 

This course, which includes two CDC bulletins, discusses the findings of the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV), the most comprehensive nationwide survey of the incidence and prevalence of children’s exposure to violence to date, sponsored by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The survey confirms the alarming statistic that most of our society’s children are exposed to violence in their daily lives. More than 60% of the children surveyed were exposed to violence within the past year, either directly or indirectly. The reports further reveal the adverse effects suffered by children who witness violence, identify risk and protective factors, and describe the key elements of designing an effective response. This course satisfies the domestic violence requirement for biennial relicensure of Florida mental health professionals.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer online continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Cyberbullying – New 2-Hour Online CE Course

By Edie Deane-Watson, MS, CCC-A, CCM & Laura More, MSW, LCSW

Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying. This new online course is here to help:

CyberbullyingCyberbullying is a new 2-hour online CEU course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. Cyberbullying is intentional behavior, meant to hurt another person. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. It is by nature invasive and repetitive. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. Cyberbullying is similar to in-person bullying in three ways: it is an act of aggression, there is a power imbalance, and the negative behavior is often repeated. Unlike traditional in-person bullying, however, cyberbullying is persistent and invasive. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Course #21-09 | 2016 | 32 pages | 15 posttest questions | $28

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

 

Cyberbullying And Depression Go Hand In Hand

By Stephanie Pappas

Cyberbullying And DepressionCyberbullying on social media is linked to depression in teenagers, according to new research that analyzed multiple studies of the online phenomenon.

Victimization of young people online has received an increasing level of scrutiny, particularly after a series of high-profile suicides of teenagers who were reportedly bullied on various social networks. In 2013, for example, a spate of suicides was linked to the social network Ask.fm, where users can ask each other questions anonymously. The deaths of teens who had been subject to abuse on the site prompted Ask.fm (which was acquired by Ask.com in 2014) to launch new safety efforts. Twitter, likewise, announced plans in April to filter out abusive tweets and suspend bullying users.

Social media use is hugely common among teenagers, said Michele Hamm, a researcher in pediatrics at the University of Alberta, but the health effects of cyberbullying on social media sites is largely unknown. Regular, face-to-face bullying during the teen years may double the risk of depression in adulthood, and bullying’s effects can be as bad or worse than child abuse, studies show.

A Depressing Effect

In the new review, Hamm and her colleagues combed through studies on cyberbullying and social media, finding 36 that investigated the effects of cyberbullying on health in teens ages 12 to 18. Although the studies examined different health outcomes and sometimes defined cyberbullying differently, one finding stood out.

“There were consistent associations between exposure to cyberbullying and increased likelihood of depression,” Hamm told Live Science.

The studies covered a variety of social sites, but Facebook was the most common — between 89 percent and 97.5 percent of the teens who used social media had a Facebook account. Seventeen of the 36 studies analyzed looked at how common cyberbullying was, and the researchers found that a median of 23 percent of teens reporting being targeted. About 15 percent reported bullying someone online themselves.

Two studies examined the prevalence of so-called “bully-victims,” meaning teens who both bully others and are bullied. Research on offline bullying shows these kids to be most at-risk for mental health problems. One study found that 5.4 percent of teens were bully-victims, while the other reported a prevalence of 11.2 percent.

Safe Social Media

Despite the well-publicized suicide cases linked to cyberbullying in news reports, Hamm and her colleagues did not find consistent links between being bullied and self-harm across the studies. Nor did they see a consistent link between cyberbullying and anxiety. Some studies found evidence for these links, and others did not.

However, Hamm cautioned, the findings don’t mean these links don’t exist. The 36 studies used a variety of definitions and health outcomes, and not enough work has been done to confirm or rule out connections between cyberbullying and anxiety or self-harm.

But cyberbullying and depression went hand-in-hand, the researchers reported June 22, 2015 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Ten studies examined the link between social media victimization and depression, and all of them found a connection.

Alone, these studies can’t prove that the bullying caused the depression — it’s possible that depressed teens are more likely to become targets of bullying than their healthier peers. However, Hamm said, one of the 10 studies did follow the teens over time and found that the cyberbullying preceded the teens’ depression, hinting at a causal relationship. The research also found that the more cyberbullying a teen experienced, the more severe his or her symptoms of depression.

Alarmingly, teens typically suffered cyberbullying in silence. “Kids really are hesitant to tell anyone when cyberbullying occurs,” Hamm said. “There seems to be a common fear that if they tell their parents, for example, they’ll lose their Internet access.”

Therefore, it’s important for parents to respond carefully if their kids are being bullied online, and to teach teens safe Internet use rather than cutting off permission to use the Web, she said.

“Parents need to address that this is happening and that the Internet and social media is here,” Hamm said. “It’s an important part of their kids’ lives. But it needs to be a whole team approach.”

Follow Stephanie Pappas on Twitter and Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Related Online CEU Courses:

Electronic Media and Youth Violence is a 1-hour online CEU course that summarizes what is known about young people and electronic aggression, provides strategies for addressing the issue with young people, and discusses the implications for school staff, mental health professionals, parents and caregivers.

Bullying Prevention: Raising Strong Kids by Responding to Hurtful & Harmful Behavior is a 3-hour video-based continuing education (CE/CEU) course that teaches healthcare professionals how to handle and treat bullying behavior.

Building Resilience in your Young Client is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.

Depression is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

Depression: What You Must Know is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides in depth information about the diagnosis and treatment of depression in a simple, straightforward way.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.