Anemia in the Elderly a Potential Dementia Risk Factor

By: Sue Hughes @ Medscape

Anemia in the Elderly a Potential Dementia Risk FactorAmong older adults, anemia is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia, a new study shows.

“We found that if there was anemia at baseline, the risk of dementia was increased by about 60%. This was slightly reduced after adjusting for other factors. But there was still a 40-50% increase in risk which was still quite significant. Anemia is of course a marker of general frailty, which will also correlate with dementia but we tried to control for this,” senior author, Kristine Yaffe, MD, University of California San Francisco, told Medscape Medical News.

She acknowledged that this is not enough evidence to say that correcting anemia will reduce the risk for dementia.

“We need another study where the anemia is treated to make this claim, but we could say that this is another reason to check for anemia more often in older people and to treat it.”

“I am not suggesting that these results should prompt people to rush out and start taking large doses of iron. If they want to rush out and do anything they should make sure they have an annual check up and get their hemoglobin measured, and if it is low get it corrected, under medical supervision,” Dr. Yaffe added.

Read more: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/808776

Related Online CEU Courses:

Alzheimer’s Disease – Overview is a 1-hour online CEU course that provides an overview of the prevalence, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as information about caregiving and caregiver support.

Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease is a 3-hour online CEU course that discusses practical issues concerning caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease who has mild-to-moderate impairment, including a description of common challenges and coping strategies.

Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery is a 3-hour online CEU course that describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education courses by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the National Association of Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Illinois DPR for Social Work; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

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DSM-5: The End of One-Size-Fits-All Addiction Treatment?

By Mark Willenbring

DSM-5: The End of One-Size-Fits-All Addiction Treatment?When the dust of debate settles, the new revision’s benefits should be clear: good science, better diagnoses, more individualized care.

Sometime this month, the DSM-5 will replace the DSM-IV as the coin of the realm for diagnosis of mental illnesses, including substance use disorders. Despite the unprecedented criticism that has accompanied the process, the final product’s changes are based on very solid epidemiological research, and they are likely to reduce ambiguity and confusion. But there may be some surprise, too, as received wisdom about the diagnosis and treatment of addiction is turned on its head. Let’s hope that this development will result in a more rational and nuanced approach to addiction.

When the DSM-IV was developed, it appeared that abuse and dependence were two distinct disorders. Substance abuse was defined according to four criteria; dependence, according to seven criteria. In practice, “abuse” was often used to denote a milder form of Substance Use Disorder (SUD); “dependence,” a more severe SUD.

In the case of opioids, “dependence” was confusing because almost anyone on opioid-based painkillers for any length of time develops physiological dependence (they will have withdrawal if they stop suddenly), whereas in the DSM-IV, “dependence” meant “addiction” (pathological, compulsive, harmful use). So pain patients prescribed opioids were mislabeled as opioid “dependent” even though they took their medication as prescribed.

Since then, a considerable body of research has shown that there are not two distinct types of substance misuse, but only one. More important, most DSM-IV “abuse” symptoms develop only in people with severe addiction, while “dependence” symptoms are among the earliest to develop. In the DSM-5, “abuse” and “dependence” are gone. In their place is the single “Substance Use Disorder.”

With alcohol, for example, the earliest and most common problems are “internal” problems, such as going over limits, persistent desire to quit or cut down, and use despite hangover or nausea. The only “abuse” criterion that develops early is drinking and driving, but without a DUI. In the largest study of its kind, the NIAAA Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), 90 percent of people who met criteria for DSM-IV alcohol abuse—but not dependence—did so because of admitting drinking and driving. All other abuse criteria only occurred in people with the most severe and chronic addiction, and then late in the game.

In fact, legal problems occur so infrequently that this criterion was dropped from theDSM-5. This may come as a surprise to people working in the treatment industry because legal problems are the most common reason people seek treatment in rehab. But only about 12 percent of people with DSM-IV alcohol dependence ever seek specialty treatment, which suggests that the rest—who are not in treatment—have less severe disorders. People in rehab or AA are to alcohol use disorder what asthmatics on a ventilator in the ICU are to people with asthma: the most severe, treatment-refractory disorders as well as the most co-morbid psychiatric and medical problems. We’ve made a large error by assuming that everyone in the community who meets the criteria for a substance disorder has exactly the same disease as people in rehab or AA.

Read more @ http://www.psmag.com/health/dsm-5-the-end-of-one-size-fits-all-treatment-57193/

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Important Notice About NBCOT Professional Development Units

For NBCOT PDU ID#8, certificants who have successfully completed education (workshops, seminars, lectures, online courses, or conferences) with an assessment component at the end of the program (scored test, project, paper) provided by AOTA, AOTA Approved Providers, IACET authorized providers, or regionally accredited colleges or universities can convert 0.1 CEU to a 1.25 NBCOT PDU. To learn more, go to www.nbcot.org, and click on the “Certification Review” tab at the top and then “PDU Calculator.”

NBCOT PDU Conversion Calculator

Multicultural Issues in Counseling – Psychological Treatment of Ethnic Minorities – New 2-Hour Web-Based Online Course

Multicultural Issues in Counseling - Psychological Treatment of Ethnic MinoritiesCourse Abstract: Multicultural Issues in Counseling – Psychological Treatment of Ethnic Minorities is based on thorough reviews of the research literature. The document provides specific cultural information about African-American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and multiracial populations, as well as recommendations for treatment related to each group. This course is appropriate for any mental health professional who would like to learn more about diversity and multicultural counseling. Course #20-56 | 2011 | 15 posttest questions | 4 page course download includes instructions, links to online materials and posttest questions

CE Credit: 2 Hours (0.2 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists, Marriage & Family Therapists
Learning Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

1. Define cultural competence in the treatment of ethnic minority populations
2. List recommendations for the treatment of Asian American/Pacific Islander populations
3. List recommendations for the treatment of African descent populations
4. List recommendations for the treatment of Hispanic/Latino populations
5. List recommendations for the treatment of American Indian populations

 

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All the documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

 

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

Behavioral Health Care Needs of Rural Women – New 1-Hour Web-Based Online CE Course

Behavioral Health Care Needs of Rural WomenCourse Abstract:

This is a web-based course requiring an internet connection to access the required online reading materials. Course instructions provide a direct link to the public-access online document. This report attempts to direct attention to this underrepresented group and presents a review of the literature related to the behavioral health care needs of rural women. With this knowledge, psychologists and other health professionals will be able to more effectively plan and deliver services to this population. Additional goals for this report include identifying those questions, which still remain unanswered, and providing recommendations for future research, action, and advocacy related to addressing the needs of this underserved population. Course #10-40 | 2011 | 7 posttest questions | 3 page course download includes instructions, link to online document, and posttest questions

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify demographic issues that place rural women at risk for various psychological disorders
  2. List psychological disorders and other chronic illnesses commonly identified in rural women
  3. Identify special populations of rural women in need of psychological treatments
  4. List barriers to treatment, including cultural, fiscal, and attitudinal considerations
  5. Identify recommended strategies for psychologists in rural communities

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All of the documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

 

New 3-Hour Web-Based Course: Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery

Alzheimer's - Unraveling the Mystery - New 3-hour online continuing education courseOne person out of eight will get Alzheimer’s by the age of 65 – and nearly half by the age of 85. Such shocking statistics drive the need to know all we can about Alzheimer’s, so we can better help our patients, their families, and ours.

Alzheimer’s dementia is a growing concern among the aging Baby Boomers; yet, modern science points the way to reducing the risks through maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

This new continuing education course, Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery, is based on a publication from the National Institute on Aging, which describes healthy brain functioning during the aging process and then contrasts it to the processes of Alzheimer’s disease.

Full of colorful, detailed diagrams, this educational booklet describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments. Strategies for caregivers and reducing caregiver stress are also discussed briefly.

Course #30-54 | 2011 | 21 posttest questions | 5 page course download includes instructions, link to online document and posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Learning Level: Introductory

Cost: $24.30 (includes 10% off coupon on right)

Learn More & Order Now!

Emotional Overeating – New 4-Hour Online CE Course

Emotional Overeating - 4 Hour CE CourseWith the current flux of diet resolutions and obesity issues, we are pleased to introduce our newest online CE course, Emotional Overeating: Practical Management Techniques.

Statistics report that Americans are an increasingly overweight population. Among the factors contributing to our struggle to stop tipping the scales is the component of “emotional eating” – or the use of food to attempt to fill emotional needs.

Professionals in both the physical and emotional health fields encounter patients with emotional eating problems on a regular basis. Even clients who do not bring this as their presenting problem often have it on their list of unhealthy behaviors that contribute to or are intertwined with their priority concerns.

While not an easy task, it is possible to learn methods for dismantling emotional eating habits. The goals of this course are to present information about the causes of emotional eating, and provide a body of cognitive and behavioral exercises that can help to eliminate the addictive pattern. Course #40-26 | 2011 | 44 pages | 30 posttest questions

CE Credit: 4 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate
Cost: $56 (includes online course materials & CE test)

Learn More & Order Now!

Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues and Nutrition – Updated & Renewed

Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues & NutritionOne of our most popular continuing education courses, Autism Subtypes, Feeding Issues & Nutrition Considerations, was recently updated and renewed by the continuing education board of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). ASHA credit is now valid until August 21, 2013!

This course details the symptoms and subtypes of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), describes developmental and behavioral issues, outlines assessment and diagnostic considerations, and briefly reviews the literature on the efficacy of various treatment approaches.

It also outlines common GI problems and feeding difficulties in autism, exploring the empirical data and/or lack thereof regarding any links between GI disorders and autism. Sections on feeding difficulties offer interventions and behavior change techniques.

A final section on nutritional considerations discusses unusual food preferences or sensitivities, growth and weight concerns, and food allergies and sensitivities with an objective look at the science and theory behind a variety of nutrition interventions.

Course #30-32 | 2010 | 45 pages | 30 posttest questions

On Sale for Only $32! (regular $42)

This course is offered for .3 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level, Professional area). ASHA credit expires 8/21/2013.

This course is also approved for Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, MFTs, Registered Dietitians and Occupational Therapists: http://www.pdresources.org/CourseDetail.aspx?Category=AllCourses&PageNumber=1&Profession=Other&Sort=CourseName&Text=30-32&courseid=947

Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Ridiculously Simple, 6th Ed

Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Ridiculously Simple, 6th EdCE Credit: 4 Hours (0.4 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Dietitians
Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Abstract:
This 4-hour mail order continuing education course includes an overview of clinical psychopharmacology written in an engaging and concise format. Focuses on general principles of psychopharmacology and key features of depression, anxiety disorders, disorders of extreme stress, disorders of control, and psychosis. MedMaster | 2009 (6th edition) | 80 pages | 15 posttest questions | Course #40-18

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify an antidepressant that is likely to result in side-effect related discontinuation
  2. Name a medication that is effective in treating dysphoric mania
  3. Name an antipsychotic medication with a low incidence of tardive dyskinesia
  4. Identify the class of antidepressants that are most effective in treating OCD

About the Author(s):

John Preston, PsyD, is the author or co-author of a number of books including: Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Ridiculously Simple, Handbook of Clinical Psychopharmacology for Therapists, You Can Beat Depression, and Every Session Counts. He is a licensed psychologist in the state of California; certified by the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology; a member of the Editorial Board of Psychopharmacology Update; and a member of the Core Faculty at Alliant International University, Sacramento, California.
James Johnson, MD
Kaiser Medical Center
Department of Psychiatry
South Sacramento, CA

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
What Customers Are Saying:
  • “Excellent review of use of psychotropic medications – the textbook is clear, organized, and well-written, making it an excellent handbook for practitioners.” – J.B. {Counselor}
  • “Enjoyed this book. Lots of succinct info for a psychologist. Also helped me diagnosis a “mystery patient” in my practice. Thanks.” – S.D. {Psychologist}
  • “I found the book hard to follow at times. For example, I would have liked a section that detailed SSRI’s and MAO Inhibitors more clearly.” – D.W. {Psychologist}
  • “This was my first attempt at getting CEU’s without attending a class. I liked having the book, studying, then taking the course. I’ll do it again next year.” – J.B. {Counselor}
  • “Charts were not helpful and somewhat misleading. Better definition of terms would be helpful.” – H.B. {Psychologist}
  • “To me this subject has always been difficult, because it has so many angles. Here, I don’t agree has been made that ridiculously easy but effectively designed. Thank you.” – S.B. {Social Worker}

Ohio Social Workers/MFTs Can Now Earn All 30 CE Hours Through Distance Learning!

Effective July 3, 2010: Ohio-licensed Social Workers and Marriage & Family Therapists (MFTs) can now earn all 30 of their required continuing education hours through distance learning courses. This was previously limited to 15 hours (Counselors are still limited to 15 hours). “Distance Learning means a formal education process, in which instruction occurs when the students and instructor(s) are not located in the same place.” Distance learning refers to all non traditional methods of presentation (home study, online courses, etc.) except video conferencing.

Social Workers: Any course that is accredited by the ASWB will be accepted by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board for continuing social work education. If the course materials say “ACE approved” or “approved as a provider for continuing education by the ASWB,” it is acceptable.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for social workers by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program).

Counselors & MFTs: Courses must be approved by the CSWMFT Board as designated by the provider approval code. The provider approval code will begin with a prefix of a variation of these letters RCSTX followed by numbers. A (C ) in the prefix shows the program is approved for counselors, an (S ) for social workers and (T) for Marriage & Family Therapists.

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education for Social Workers, Counselors & MFTs by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage & Family Therapist Board (Provider #RCST100501). Courses that are approved by the Ohio CSWMFT Board have the provider code listed in the accreditation statement on the course details page.

All licensees are required to earn 3 hours of continuing education in ethics each renewal period. Professional Development Resources offers a variety of ethics courses for Social Workers, Counselors & MFTs.

Counselors holding the supervising counselor designation must complete 6 hours of supervisory training per renewal cycle.

Social Workers holding the supervising designation must complete 3 hours of supervisory training per renewal cycle.