Why Sleep Is Even More Essential For People With Bipolar Disorder

By

Sleep: The Other Half of Bipolar MedicationDespite having lived with bipolar disorder for over twenty years, it wasn’t until my current psychiatrist and psychologist incorporated regular dialogues about sleep that I finally tuned in. My psychologist reminded me at many appointments that sleep was the other half of my medication.

And it finally stuck.

Though when I thought back to all the mental health professionals over the years, I wondered why this knowledge wasn’t ingrained in me sooner. Surely, they must have brought this up. Was I not listening? Or, had emphasis not been placed on it back then? According to PubMed a.k.a. NCBI, the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information, mania and sleep were linked. Still, those were only part of the equation, there were also circadian rhythms, our twenty-four hour clocks, to contend with.

One study showed bright light and sleep restriction acted as an antidepressant and sometimes triggered mania. WebMD stated that for three out of four people with bipolar disorder sleep problems were the most common signal a period of mania was about to occur. This is why being aware of our sleep patterns is of paramount importance though often our loved ones see it first.

After reading a fast-forward research article by Dr. Ellen Frank PhD, I tracked her down for more insight. Dr. Frank is the author of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, a distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and a member of the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center. She shared this:

Both our clinical experience and our research studies into the effects of life events on the course of bipolar disorder show the fundamental importance of sleep in maintaining wellness. Staying up all night to study for an exam or to finish a project may be perfectly safe for someone who does not have bipolar disorder, but it is extremely risky for someone who does. Likewise, people who don’t have bipolar disorder may be able to manage rotating shift work without much in the way of consequences. For someone with bipolar disorder it’s poison….like asking someone with lung disease to take a job removing asbestos.

Countless times in my early twenties I proved this to be true though unaware at that time. I was young and sleep was the last thing on my mind. One of the careers that enticed me was a flight attendant, though instinctively I knew it would not end well. Apparently, jet lag can kick off a hypomanic or manic episode.

Dr. Frank continued, “It seems that individuals who have bipolar disorder are just much more sensitive to any kind of challenge to their circadian system – the change to daylight savings time or jet lag, for example, and have much more difficulty resetting the body’s clock when it’s been challenged. That’s why it’s crucial for their sleep to be regular, at the same time each night and consistent.”
Interested in circadian rhythms, I sought out private psychiatrist Dr. Robert C. Bransfield, MD, DFAPA, PC in Middletown, NJ.

Dr. Bransfield said, “Greater amounts of light during the spring and early summer, working on computers at night, large screen TV sets and household lighting increase the light exposure to our retina and disrupts the circadian rhythm. Improving sleep can reduce the risk of a manic episode.”

This only drove home the importance of sleep, but it has been difficult, especially in times of hypomania. With each passing year though I became more vigilant , after all the dreaded “episode zone” and hospital are two places I have not enjoyed visiting.

These are some of my sleep wellness tips.

Wendy’s Sleep Tips:

  1. Try for 8-9 hours a night.The longer, the better especially if you are manic.
  2. Turn off cell phone ringer. I do use mine for alarms, but keep it silent for calls.
  3. Read rather than watch TV to fall asleep. This helps me fall asleep faster and avoids the bad habit of watching TV in the bedroom.
  4. Sleep with white or background noise. Besides the fantastic white noise machines that I swear by (on-line around $50.00) they also have free white noise apps. Air-conditioners and fans work like a charm too.
  5. Maintain consistent daily routine and sleep schedules. Aim to sleep the same hours each night, and keep your schedule steady. Although this is a struggle during times of hypomania, keep at it.
  6. Get the temperature right. If you’re too hot or too cold, you will likely flip around or have to get up to adjust the temperature.
  7. Take seasonal precautions, when necessary. During times of the year such as change of seasons, fall and spring especially, my doctor changes one medication to help me sleep. If this is your pattern, make an appointment early.
  8. Keep pets out of your bed. Of course we love them but it’s not okay if Fido or Tigger interrupt our sleep. I constantly ask myself, is it more important that my cat is happy and comfortable or that I am healthy? Resist the urge, I know it’s hard.

Remember, sleep is the other half of our medication. We are not talking counting sheep and sweet dreams, this is about our mood stabilization and staying out of the hospital. Remove any obstacles or distractions and make a pact to prioritize your wellness.

This just may one of the few advantages to having bipolar disorder. Who doesn’t love to sleep? So pull up the covers, my fellow bipolarians, tuck yourselves in and stay well!

Related Online CEU Courses:

Bipolar Disorder in Adults is a 1-hour online CEU course that provides a brief overview of the signs and symptoms, diagnostic considerations and treatment options for BPD in adults.

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD, and other therapies.

Treating Bipolar Disorder is a 6-hour CEU course that presents a powerful approach for helping people manage bipolar illness and protect against the recurrence of manic or depressive episodes.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

Bipolar Disorder in Adults – New CE Course

Bipolar Disorder in Adults - New CE Course from PDResources.org!

 

Bipolar Disorder in Adults

Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out daily tasks. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and this new introductory course can help…

10-92

Bipolar Disorder in Adults is a new 1-hour online CEU course that provides a brief overview of the signs and symptoms, diagnostic considerations, co-morbid conditions, risk factors, and treatment options for bipolar disorder in adults. Course #10-92 | 2012 | 28 pages | 10 posttest questions

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Learning Level: Introductory
Course Price: $12

Click here to enroll…

***

You might also like…

Bipolar Disorder in Children

1 Hour CE | $12

Managing Chronic Pain

5 Hours CE | $60

Anxiety

4 Hours CE | $56

Nutrition in Mental Health

3 Hours CE | $39

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWBProvider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

What Bipolar Disorder Really Feels Like

By

Bipolar DisorderAbout 2.6 percent of American adults — nearly 6 million people — have bipolar disorder, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). But the disease, characterized by significant and severe mood changes, is still dangerously misunderstood.

Bipolar disorder is vastly different from the normal ups and downs of everyday life, but many have co-opted the term to refer to any old change in thoughts or feelings. The mood swings in someone with bipolar disorder, sometimes also called manic depression, can damage relationships and hurt job performance. It has been estimated that anywhere from 25 to 50 percent of people with bipolar disorder attempt suicide at least once.

Artist Ellen Forney detailed her diagnosis with bipolar disorder in the graphic memoir Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me. Forney previously shared her story with us, specifically detailing how her bipolar disorder has affected her creative work.

Read more @ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/18/bipolar-disorder-ellen-forney_n_5823138.html?ir=Healthy%20Living&utm_campaign=091814&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Alert-healthy-living&utm_content=Title

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents is a 1-hour online continuing education course that describes the symptoms and treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents. All parents can relate to the many changes their children go through as they grow up. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if a child is just going through a “phase,” or showing signs of something more serious. In the last decade, the number of children receiving the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, sometimes, called manic-depressive illness, has grown substantially. But what does the diagnosis really mean for a child? This course discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD (along with their individual cautions), and other therapies. Course #10-68 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions

This web-based online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) and mark your answers on while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Bipolar Disorder in Children & Adolescents

Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night. Oil on can...

Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night. Oil on canvas, 73×92 cm, 28¾×36¼ in. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Excerpted from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Publication Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents, 2012.

What is bipolar disorder?

All parents can relate to the many changes their kids go through as they grow up. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if a child is just going through a “phase,” or showing signs of something more serious. In the last decade, the number of children receiving the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, sometimes, called manic-depressive illness, has grown substantially. But what does the diagnosis really mean for a child?

Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, and activity levels. It can also make it hard to carry out day-to-day tasks, such as going to school or hanging out with friends. Symptoms of bipolar disorder can be severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and many people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.

Symptoms of bipolar disorder often develop in the late teens or early adult years, but some people have their first symptoms during childhood. At least half of all cases start before age 25.

Bipolar disorder tends to run in families. Children with a parent or sibling who has bipolar disorder are up to six times more likely to develop the illness, compared with children who do not have a family history of bipolar disorder. However, most children with a family history of bipolar disorder will not develop the illness.

What are the signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents?

Youth with bipolar disorder experience unusually intense emotional states that occur in distinct periods called “mood episodes.” The extreme highs and lows of mood are accompanied by extreme changes in energy, activity, sleep, and behavior. Each mood episode represents a drastic change from a person’s usual mood and behavior.

An overly joyful or overexcited state is called a manic episode. An extremely sad or hopeless state is called a depressive episode. Sometimes, a mood episode includes symptoms of both mania and depression. This is called a mixed state. People with bipolar disorder also may be explosive and irritable during a mood episode.

Symptoms of mania include:

Mood Changes
• Being in an overly silly or joyful mood that is unusual for the child. It is different from times when he or she is just being silly and having fun
• Having an extremely short temper and unusual irritability

Behavioral Changes
• Sleeping little but not feeling tired
• Talking a lot and having racing thoughts
• Having trouble concentrating or paying attention, jumping from one thing to the next in an unusual way
• Talking and thinking about sex more often than usual
• Behaving in risky ways more often, seeking pleasure a lot, and doing more activities than usual.

Symptoms of depression include:

Mood Changes
• Being in a sad mood that lasts a long time
• Losing interest in activities once enjoyed
• Feeling worthless or guilty

Behavioral Changes
• Complaining about pain more often, such as headaches, stomach aches, and muscle pains
• Eating a lot more or less than usual and gaining or losing a lot of weight
• Sleeping or oversleeping when these were not problems before
• Losing energy
• Recurring thoughts of death or suicide

It’s normal for almost every child or teen to show some of these behaviors sometimes. These passing changes should not be confused with bipolar disorder.

Symptoms of bipolar disorder are not like the normal changes in mood and energy that everyone has. Bipolar symptoms are more extreme and tend to last for most of the day, nearly every day, for at least one week. Also, depressive or manic episodes include moods very different from a child’s normal mood, and the behaviors generally all come on at the same time. Sometimes the symptoms of bipolar disorder are so severe that the child needs to be treated in a hospital.

Bipolar disorder can be present even when mood swings are less extreme. For example, sometimes a child may have more energy and be more active than normal, but not show the severe signs of a full-blown manic episode. This is called hypomania. It generally lasts for at least four days in a row. Hypomania causes noticeable changes in behavior, but does not harm a child’s ability to function in the same way that mania does.

How does bipolar disorder affect children and adolescents differently than adults?

Bipolar disorder that starts during childhood or the early teen years is called early-onset bipolar disorder, and seems to be more severe than the forms that first appear in older teens and adults. Youth with bipolar disorder are different from adults with bipolar disorder. Young people with the illness appear to have more frequent mood switches, are sick more often, and have more mixed episodes.

It is important to watch out for any sign of suicidal thinking or behaviors. Take these signs seriously. On average, people with early-onset bipolar disorder are at greater risk for attempting suicide than those whose symptoms start in adulthood. One large study on bipolar disorder in children and teens found that more than one-third of study participants made at least one serious suicide attempt. Some suicide attempts are carefully planned and others are not. Either way, it is important to understand that suicidal feelings and actions are symptoms of an illness that must be treated.

What treatments are available for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder?

Currently, there is no cure for bipolar disorder. However, treatment with medications, psychotherapy, or both may help people recover from their episodes, and may help to prevent future episodes.

To treat children and teens with bipolar disorder, doctors often rely on information about treating adults. This is because there haven’t been many studies on treating young people with the illness.

One large study with adults funded by NIMH was the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD). This study found that treating adults with medications and intensive psychotherapy for about nine months helped them get better. These adults got better faster and stayed well longer than adults treated with less intensive psychotherapy for 6 weeks. Combining medication treatment and psychotherapies may help young people with early-onset bipolar disorder as well. However, children sometimes respond differently to psychiatric medications than adults.

Medications

Before starting medication, your doctor will want to determine a child’s physical and mental health. This is called a “baseline” assessment. The child will need regular follow-up visits to monitor treatment progress and side effects. Most children with bipolar disorder will also need long-term or even lifelong medication treatment. This is often the best way to manage symptoms and prevent relapse, or a return of symptoms.

It’s better to limit the number and dose of medications. A good way to remember this is to “start low, go slow.” Talk to the doctor about using the smallest amount of medication that helps relieve the child’s symptoms. To judge a medication’s effectiveness, the child may need to take a medication for several weeks or months. The doctor or specialist needs this time to decide whether the medication is working or if they need to switch to a different medication. Because children’s symptoms are usually complex, they commonly need more than one type of medication.

Keeping a daily log of the child’s most troublesome symptoms can make it easier for the doctor to determine whether a medication is helpful. Also, be sure to tell the doctor about all other prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, or natural supplements the child is taking. Combining certain medications and supplements may cause unwanted or dangerous side effects.

Psychotherapy

In addition to medication, psychotherapy can be an effective treatment for bipolar disorder. When treating bipolar disorder, psychotherapy is usually prescribed in combination with medication. Studies in adults show that it can provide support, education, and guidance to people with bipolar disorder and their families. Psychotherapy may also help children continue taking their medications to stay healthy and prevent relapse.

If you would like the full text of this publication, it is in the public domain and available at no cost at http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/bipolar-disorder-in-children-and-adolescents/index.shtml

If you would like to read this entire booklet and receive one hour of continuing education credit, visit Professional Development Resources at https://pdresources.org/course/index/6/1176/Bipolar-Disorder-in-Children-and-Adolescents

 

More Free Resources:

Enhanced by Zemanta

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

By the National Institute of Mental Health

In the last decade, the number of children receiving the diagnosis of bipolar disorder has grown substantially. But what does the diagnosis really mean for a child?

Bipolar Disorder in Children and AdolescentsBipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the symptoms and treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents. All parents can relate to the many changes their children go through as they grow up. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if a child is just going through a “phase,” or showing signs of something more serious. This course discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD (along with their individual cautions), and other therapies. Course #10-68 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions | $19

CE INFORMATION

Professional Development Resource is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Illinois DPR for Social Work (#159-00531); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Learn more @ https://www.pdresources.org/course/index/6/1176/Bipolar-Disorders-in-Children-and-Adolescents

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effective for Bipolar Disorder

By

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effective for Bipolar DisorderWhen someone begins treatment for bipolar disorder, I always recommend therapy along with medication because we know from studies that the combination of the two treatments works better than either alone.

However, most people think about psychotherapy (talk-therapy) when the word therapy is mentioned. That is not a bad thing. Psychotherapy has helped many people with and without bipolar disorder lead fuller, happier lives.

But another option that is effective for many people is cognitive behavioral therapy. This therapy has only been applied to bipolar disorder in the last decade, but it has been used to treat depression even longer. Studies on its effectiveness in bipolar disorder are preliminary, but so far the evidence suggests it is effective.

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Cognitive behavioral therapy is different than traditional therapy in that it is short-term and doesn’t involve delving into historic issues. Cognitive behavioral therapy is about the here and now and is about giving you tools to deal with the symptoms of bipolar disorder that you are experiencing today.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is an analytical process that encourages people to look at their behavior, feelings, and motivations to learn what triggers these situations and what can be done to handle them.

For example, in cognitive behavioral therapy:

  • The patient is asked to explore their distorted thinking such as “I am god” when manic or “I am worthless” when depressed.
  • Patients are encouraged to develop interpersonal routines such as sleeping and waking at the same time each day.
  • Patients work to understand the warning signs of oncoming mood episodes and learn how to cope with these symptoms to avoid episodes where possible (relapse prevention).
  • Patients are aided in exploring what triggers episodes or specific emotions.

Cognitive behavioral therapy may be delivered one-on-one or in groups.

For Whom Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work?

It is my belief that anyone can benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy in some way; however, statistically, people with fewer than six mood episodes have been shown to have greater success with this therapy. Also, people who are in the midst of a crisis—either mania or depression—may not be in a place emotionally or intellectually to optimally benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Some degree of stability should be attained before attempting this therapy (medication and traditional psychotherapy may help achieve this).

It is recommended that specialists in cognitive behavioral therapy deliver the treatment for greatest success. If therapy is not available in your area, workbooks are available to walk you through the therapy although this likely won’t be as beneficial as a live therapist (and likely won’t be bipolar-specific).

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Is About Tools

Cognitive behavioral therapy is not a magic bullet for mental illness but it is an assortment of tools that can help you battle the illness every day. It helps you deal with the symptoms that may linger in spite of treatment with medication or while searching for the right medication.

Find out more about cognitive behavioral therapy from Simon Fraser University’s Core Information Document on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or visiting Healthline’s page on cognitive behavioral therapy.

Source: http://www.healthline.com/health-blogs/bipolar-bites/cognitive-behavioral-therapy-effective-bipolar-disorder

Related Continuing Education Courses:

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Free Borderline Disorder Call In Series

Via Scoop.itHealthcare Continuing Education

Free BPD Call In Series

Thanks to the generosity of the professional borderline personality disorder community, the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder will be hosting lectures on the phone providing the larger community the opportunity to hear the latest information and research on the disorder.

Show original

Enhanced by Zemanta

Treating Bipolar Disorder – Only 5 Left!

Via Scoop.itHealthcare Continuing Education

This 6-hour CE course presents a powerful approach for helping people manage bipolar illness and protect against the recurrence of manic or depressive episodes. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy focuses on stabilizing moods by improving medication adherence, building coping skills and relationship satisfaction, and shoring up the regularity of daily rhythms or routines. Each phase of this flexible, evidence-based treatment is vividly detailed, from screening, assessment, and case conceptualization through acute therapy, maintenance treatment, and periodic booster sessions. Among the special features are reproducible assessment tools and a chapter on how to overcome specific treatment challenges. Guilford | 2005 | 212 pages | Course #60-69
Show original

Bipolar Disorder – Overview

Bipolar Disorder - Overview

Click on image to learn more!

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person’s mood, energy, and ability to function. Different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through, the symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But there is good news: bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.

More than 2 million American adults, or about 1 percent of the population age 18 and older in any given year, have bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder typically develops in late adolescence or early adulthood. However, some people have their first symptoms during childhood, and some develop them late in life. It is often not recognized as an illness, and people may suffer for years before it is properly diagnosed and treated. Like diabetes or heart disease, bipolar disorder is a long-term illness that must be carefully managed throughout a person’s life.

“Manic-depression distorts moods and thoughts, incites dreadful behaviors, destroys the basis of rational thought, and too often erodes the desire and will to live. It is an illness that is biological in its origins, yet one that feels psychological in the experience of it; an illness that is unique in conferring advantage and pleasure, yet one that brings in its wake almost unendurable suffering and, not infrequently, suicide.”

“I am fortunate that I have not died from my illness, fortunate in having received the best medical care available, and fortunate in having the friends, colleagues, and family that I do.”

Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., An Unquiet Mind, 1995, p. 6.
(Reprinted with permission from Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc.)

Bipolar disorder causes dramatic mood swings—from overly “high” and/or irritable to sad and hopeless, and then back again, often with periods of normal mood in between. Severe changes in energy and behavior go along with these changes in mood. The periods of highs and lows are called episodes of mania and depression.

Learn more about Bipolar disorder and earn 1-hour of continuing education credit with this introductory course. Currently on sale for $6! (regular $12)

This publication, written by Melissa Spearing of NIMH, is a revision and update of an earlier version by Mary Lynn Hendrix. Scientific information and review were provided by NIMH Director Steven E. Hyman, M.D., and NIMH staff members Matthew V. Rudorfer, M.D., and Jane L. Pearson, Ph.D. Editorial assistance was provided by Clarissa K. Wittenberg, Margaret Strock, and Lisa D. Alberts of NIMH. All material in this publication is in the public domain and may be copied or reproduced without permission of the Institute. Citation of the source is appreciated.

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:

AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine