HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues

New Online CE Course @pdresources.org

HIV/AIDS: Adherence IssuesHIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection.

HIV and AIDS are medical terms that are linked together due to the progressive nature of HIV, with the end result of untreated (or undertreated) HIV becoming AIDS. The virus affects people of all ages, from children born to mothers with HIV, to adolescents, to adults, and elders. People who live with HIV can live almost normal lifespans and have little risk of transmitting the disease if they use antiretroviral therapy appropriately under medical care. However, only 55% of HIV-infected people follow their antiretroviral regimen well enough to achieve viral suppression. This course will provide strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage patients to seek and maintain medical treatment. Course # 11-18 | 2018 | 22 pages | 10 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

Course Directions

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

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World AIDS Day 2015

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

December 1 is World AIDS Day, an opportunity for people to work actively and collaboratively with partners around the world to raise awareness about HIV and help us move closer to the goal of an AIDS-free generation. This year’s theme, “The Time to Act Is Now,” calls us to act with urgency to implement the latest high-impact, evidence-based HIV prevention strategies.

Our Global Response

World AIDS Day 2015An estimated 36.9 million people are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. As a science-based public health and disease prevention agency, CDC provides support that helps more than 60 countries strengthen their national HIV/AIDS programs and build sustainable public health systems. CDC conducts these activities through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) , the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease.

Recent scientific breakthroughs now point the way to achieving an AIDS-free generation, a goal championed by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address. CDC, through PEPFAR, is working to achieve that inspiring goal through proven science, smart investments, and shared responsibility with partner countries.

Global efforts have resulted in approximately 13.5 million persons in low-income and middle-income countries receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection in 2014, an increase from 2013. Globally, more than 15 million people are on ART.

New HIV infections have fallen 35 percent since 2000, with 66 percent of the 2 million new HIV infections occurring in sub-Saharan African countries, where women account for more than half the total number of those living with HIV.

Doctor with mother and young daughter
New pediatric HIV infections have dropped by 58 percent worldwide since 2000.

CDC’s global HIV/AIDS activities are grounded in science and are critical to saving lives and preventing new infections. Core activities focus on:

  • Providing proven combination prevention interventions, including prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, antiretroviral treatment, and voluntary medical male circumcision.
  • Reaching orphans and vulnerable children, as well as other neglected and hard-to-reach populations.
  • Building and enhancing health systems, including sustainable human resources for health (e.g., health care workers) and accurate, reliable laboratory systems.


CDC’s innovative programs are helping countries collect and use more detailed data to target HIV treatment services to where they are needed most and to reduce the cost of delivering services. These activities also support greater accountability and transparency in the use of U.S. government funds. CDC works with key partners such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria —to which the United States is the largest contributor—to ensure complementary programming for maximum impact of investments.

CDC has contributed to saving millions of lives through PEPFAR. Across the globe, AIDS-related deaths have fallen by 42 percent since the peak in 2004. The increased life expectancies of people in their most productive years have helped build more secure families and bolstered fragile nations devastated by the HIV epidemic. New pediatric HIV infections have dropped by 58 percent since 2000. Worldwide, 220,000 children became newly infected with HIV in 2014, down from 520,000 in 2000. This significant achievement is due largely to evidence-based programming to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Still, millions of people around the globe are waiting for access to lifesaving antiretroviral drugs.

The United States has made an unwavering commitment to work with partner governments and other stakeholders to turn the tide on HIV/AIDS. The goal of achieving an AIDS-free generation worldwide is a shared responsibility, with partner countries in the central role.

Poster: Let’s Stop HIV Together. I am a son, a designer, and a business owner. And I am living with HIV. Kevin.
The Let’s Stop HIV Together campaign fights stigma and seeks to ensure that all Americans know the facts about HIV. Visit Act Against AIDS for campaign resources.

Our Domestic Response

Around 1.2 million people are living with HIV in the United States, and 1 in 8 don’t know it. The number of new HIV diagnoses has remained fairly stable in recent years.

More tools than ever are available to prevent HIV, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people who are at very high risk for getting HIV. Taking PrEP medicine daily can reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it can reduce the risk by more than 70%. The latest edition of Vital Signs, released on November 24, 2015, provides more information on populations who could benefit from PrEP. According to the report, many people in the United States, especially many gay and bisexual men and injection drug users, are at high risk for HIV and could benefit from PrEP.

This year, the White House updated the National HIV/AIDS Strategy to 2020. On World AIDS Day, it will release a federal action plan to implement the strategy. CDC supports the strategy’s vision of a nation where new HIV infections are rare. CDC’s HIV prevention efforts in the United States target the populations most at risk and include:

  • Providing funding and technical assistance for health departments.
  • Conducting surveillance and behavioral research.
  • Developing guidelines for HIV treatment, surveillance, and laboratory procedures.
  • Evaluating programs.
  • Conducting outreach and communication campaigns through the Act Against AIDS initiative, including the campaign Let’s Stop HIV Together, which fights stigma and seeks to ensure that all Americans know the facts about HIV. Let’s Stop HIV Together includes many personal stories about living with HIV.
  • Providing training in HIV prevention and treatment.


Also, CDC, along with other agencies and organizations, will convene the 2015 National HIV Prevention Conference, December 6-9, 2015. This conference will facilitate collaboration among scientists, health care providers, community workers, and others who are working to stop the spread of HIV in the United States.

CDC continues to work with our many partners to bring the best available prevention and treatment tools to the communities that need them most, at home and around the world. On this World AIDS Day, we are pleased to join our partners to take unified action to prevent the spread of HIV.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/features/worldaidsday/

Related Online CEU Courses:

HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection, as well as strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage patients to seek and maintain medical treatment.

HIV/AIDS: Therapy and Adherence is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection and provides strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage people with HIV to seek and maintain medical treatment.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

HIV/AIDS: Adherence Key to Success

 

Course excerpt from HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues

HIV and AIDS are medical terms that are linked together due to the progressive nature of HIV, with the end result of untreated (or undertreated) HIV being AIDS. The acronym stands for:

HIV/AIDS: Adherence IssuesH: Human. The virus affects humans.

I: Immuno-deficiency. The virus creates a deficiency in the person’s immune system so it does not work properly to fight disease.

V: Virus. The organism is viral; it replicates itself by hijacking the person’s cells.

A: Acquired. This is not a genetic condition, but an infection that is acquired through a person’s actions or by transmission through infected blood.

I: Immune. The immune system is affected.

D: Deficiency. It makes the immune system deficient in the capacity to fight infection.

S: Syndrome. The compromised immune system allows many different infections and diseases to take hold. Each person has a different experience of AIDS symptoms.

It is important to adopt an inclusive description of those populations who are affected by HIV/AIDS. The virus affects people of all ages, from children born to mothers with HIV, to adolescents, to adults, and elders. While having sex or sharing drug injection equipment with someone who is infected with HIV causes most cases of HIV, it has also affected some individuals who were infected by blood transfusions prior to general testing of the blood supply in the late 1970’s/early 1980’s. Although the first cases began to surface in 1981, it was not until 1985 that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed the first commercial blood test, ELISA, to detect antibodies to HIV in the blood. At that time, blood banks began screening the U.S. blood supply (AIDS.gov – https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/aids-timeline/). Some of the individuals who were infected in those early days are still living today.

Casual contact cannot spread the disease. Shaking hands, using a toilet after a person with HIV, or drinking from a public water fountain will not transmit the disease. HIV is primarily transmitted through behaviors such as:

  • Sex with someone who has HIV. The highest risk is anal sex, but other types of sex are also risky.
  • Having multiple sex partners.
  • Having other sexually transmitted diseases increases the risk of HIV infection during sex.
  • Sharing drug equipment such as syringes, needles, rinse water, or other equipment.

Unlike other viruses, the body cannot remove HIV completely. Once a person has HIV, it is there for life. The quality – and quantity – of that life will depend on adherence with treatment. People with HIV can live almost normal lifespans and have little risk of transmitting the disease if they use antiretroviral therapy appropriately under medical care and avoid risky behaviors. However, only 30% of HIV-infected people are compliant enough with treatment to achieve viral suppression.

HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues

1-Hour Online CE Course

HIV/AIDS: Adherence Issues is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course for healthcare professionals that discusses adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection, as well as strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage patients to seek and maintain medical treatment. Course #10-88 | 2015 | 17 pages | 10 posttest questions

For a more detailed discussion, see the 3-hour course HIV/AIDS: Therapy & Adherence (these courses contain common material).

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Young Women and HIV/AIDS: The Personal is Political

Via Scoop.itHealthcare Continuing Education

An Article in the Times India states that young women of reproductive age (15-24) are the single most vulnerable demographic worldwide for new HIV/AIDS cases. This is a perfect example of the central truism of feminism – that the ‘personal is political.’
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Florida OT License Renewal

Florida Board of Occupational Therapy

View the Board Website or Email the Board
Phone: 850-488-0595
CE Required: 26 hours every 2 years, of which:
2 hrs Preventing Medical Errors is required each renewal,
2 hrs Florida Occupational Therapy Laws & Rules is required each renewal,
1 hr HIV/AIDS is required for the first renewal only
Home Study Allowed: 12 hours
License Expiration: 2/28, odd years
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA
Date of Info: 12/15/2010

Renewal Information from the Florida Board of Occupational Therapy:

Renewing online is as simple as going to www.FLHealthsource.com, clicking on the “Renew My License” button on the homepage, and following the instructions. The system will allow licensees not knowing their User ID and Password to log in after answering several specific validation questions.

By renewing and submitting the appropriate renewal fees, you are acknowledging compliance with all requirements for renewal have all been completed, including continuing education requirements. You are responsible for retaining proof of all earned continuing education hours for a period of four (4) years. All licensees renewing active licenses are subject to audit and may be asked to show proof of appropriate continuing education.

If you have any problems using online renewal or other questions about your renewal, please contact the Division’s customer contact center at 850-488-0595 and choose option 3.

Please note when you complete your licensure renewal you are confirming all renewal requirements are complete, including 26 hours of continuing education have been completed as required by Rule.

Current License Holder Renewal Information

  • $60 renewal fee ($55 renewal fee = $5 unlicensed activity fee)
  • 26 hours continuing education per each biennium

Professional Development Resources is an AOTA approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of OT Practice (#34) and is CE Broker compliant.

Twelve (12) hours of home study per biennium are allowed. Home study education is independent study and requires a certificate of completion. Home study education does not include a web-based, satellite transmitted or online instruction program that allows or requires the licensee to interact or communicate back and forthwith the instructor during the presentation of the program.