The Importance of Returning to School

There is much debate and concern over how to start the 2020-2021 school year and every Board of Education across the country have the unenviable task of deciding how to proceed – bricks and mortar, online, or a hybrid of the two.

With all the debate about how to get our children back to school, it's important that we put politics aside and focus on what is best for the kids.

I thought our county and school system did a tremendous job educating our children last term. They went above and beyond the call of duty in learning how to use online teaching platforms and adjusting their objectives and lesson plans to work while teaching their students in a distance learning capacity. The reality is, however, online school or a hybrid of online and physical attendance will never, in my opinion, equal the education children receive by attending school five days a week and interacting with the class teacher, their peers, and other faculty or volunteers.

The first few weeks of a new school year are important. This is the time children and teachers learn about each other. But what does this look like if children are working from home in a variety of environments? As teachers, we will not know the routines and expectations of every household. We cannot accommodate for every circumstance. If parents are able to go to their place of business, where are the children? Do we then expect babysitters, day cares, or family members to support the child’s learning? How do we as classroom teachers, meet the needs of all students trying to learn in such a wide range of environments and with differing schedules?

As class teachers we establish routines so that children know what to expect every day. In establishing boundaries, classroom rules, and expectations, we ensure the children feel a sense of security. Students know and rely on our set timetable, anticipate what will happen as they progress through the school day, and feel safe in the knowledge that these expectations apply to everyone in the classroom, which allows them to focus on their school work.

Classroom teachers spend a great deal of time and money creating enabling environments for their students. We stock our classrooms so that children have all the resources they will need to complete assignments and have fun! From the playdough, paint, and building materials in the early years to the science experiments and games in middle and high school. Teachers not only offer the use of technology in the classroom, we are required to use technology in lessons. Thus, we have computers, iPads and internet availability. We constantly look for ways to engage the students with their learning and pique their interest so that they will want to become life-long learners.

Teachers carefully consider the layout of the classroom and the accessibility of materials. We model methods of organizing and caring for resources and teach students how to establish good practices when carrying out and turning in assignments. Children learn executive functioning skills that will help them throughout their school career and into adulthood.

One of the joys of the first term is getting to know our students. Finding out about their personalities, interests, and goals, and making a connection. We build a mutually trusting and respectful relationship with our students through shared experiences in the classroom. Furthermore, school is as much about social and emotional education as it is about academics. For how can children succeed if they do not know how to actively listen, concentrate, confidently and respectfully share their ideas and value the ideas of others, cooperate with peers, persevere when learning is difficult, or organize their space and work.

Teachers want their classroom to be a safe place in which children can work hard, try new things, and know it is ok to fail occasionally. By supporting students to bounce back from failure and try again, teachers help them to build resilience and persevere. We look for those “extra few minutes” to provide extra practice and reassurance. We reflect on the days’ lessons so that we can determine when and how best to support a struggling student. We also consider how to extend learning and challenge those students who need stretching, who mastered a skill or concept easily.

As teachers, we value our colleagues and the time spent sharing ideas and reflecting on our practice. We need our meetings with other professionals, such as speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, counselors, and social workers, so that we are providing the best opportunities for children to succeed, especially those children who have individual learning needs. Often, it is not enough to follow a strategy one or two times. As classroom teachers following the advice of other supporting professionals, we plan activities specifically to meet learning goals several times a week. The parents are also given strategies to do at home. This layering and repetition is what enables the child to master a concept and succeed. How do we ensure this all happens when children are not in the classroom, colleagues are unable to confer and support families, and parents, who already overwhelmed with work, are taking on a teacher’s responsibilities?

Teachers also support families. That “quick chat” at the beginning or end of the day can reassure and support parents and carers as they work with their children. The scheduled meeting with a teacher so that a parent or carer can share difficulties a child may be experiencing at home (such as a divorce, death of a loved one, or illness). The note sent in letting school know of a child’s accomplishment outside of school so that it can be recognized and celebrated by their peers. These open lines of communication allow teachers to foster positive relationships with students as well as their families, so that we can all support students to achieve.

So much goes into a child’s learning, much of it taking place behind the scenes. With the best will in the world, we cannot expect the same rigour or comprehensive education from a part time, online schedule as we provide to children attending school full time.

For more information, visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website’s article “The Importance of Reopening America’s Schools this Fall” (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/reopening-schools.html) or the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website’s article “ Pediatricians, educators, and Superintendents Urge a Safe Return to School This Fall” (https://services.aap.org/en/news-room/news-releases/aap/2020/pediatricians-educators-and-superintendents-urge-a-safe-return-to-school-this-fall/)

Therapy Tidbits – Summer 2020

Therapy Tidbits – Summer 2020 is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the Summer 2020 issue of The National Psychologist, a private, independent, quarterly newspaper intended to keep psychologists informed about practice issues.

Therapy Tidbits – Summer 2020 is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course comprised of select articles from the Summer 2020 issue of The National Psychologist.

The articles included in this course are:

Psychologists Pivot to Teletherapy as Pandemic Takes Hold – Practitioners share their positive experiences of moving to tele-therapy and discuss the obstacles that must be overcome in moving to the online format.

COVID-19 Brings Change to Behavioral Health for Older Adults – Discusses the ways in which clinicians have adapted practice to accommodate the needs of older patients and ensure best care while providing services through teleheath.

Teletherapy Tips – The National Psychologist’s list of recommendations from psychologists across the country for conducting E-therapy sessions.

Deconstructing Competitive Commitments – Explains three types of competitive commitments and explains how deconstructing them can help patients identify any inappropriate protective frames that might be contributing to the competitive commitment at hand.

How to Ethically Increase Access to Care During COVID-19 – Highlights the importance of thoughtfully navigating the ethics of billing and Payment during the pandemic.

Therapy in the Time of COVID-19: A Look at One Ethical Issue – Provides a decision-making model that can guide psychologists based upon principle-based ethics when faced with a patient who expresses an intent to circumvent public-health measures and place the well-being of others at risk.

Psychologists Should Help Victimizers Understand Their Past – Explores the importance of helping victimizers (internalizers and externalizers) confront their past, in order to start healing.

We Are All Victims of the ‘Attention Economy’ – Reminds us of the hidden manipulation techniques companies use to draw us in and hold our attention when using social media and apps.

Staying Together Apart: Artistic Approaches to COVID-19 – A look at how psychologists and charities in Scotland are supporting creative activities to help patients during the pandemic.

‘Please Don’t Tell My Surgeon’: Managing Privacy, Confidentiality in Integrated Healthcare Settings – Provides an overview of ethical challenges psychologists may face when working in an integrated healthcare setting.

Click here to learn more.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Video Game EndeavorRx Prescribed for ADHD

For the first time ever, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a video game as a treatment for a disorder. The game EndeavorRx must be prescribed by a physician for children who exhibit Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) which is thought to affect about 4 million children in the U.S. between the ages of 6 and 11 (LaFee, 2020). 

The FDA has approved a video game (EndeavorRx) as a treatment for ADHD, which is thought to affect about 4 million children in the U.S.

According to DSM-5 (2013) ADHD involves “a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development.” The myriad of potential qualifying symptoms negatively impact the child’s social and academic activities.

The great irony here is that “addiction” to video gaming in many children is very problematic to their functioning and development and parents are rightly concerned. Now a certain video game (EndeavorRx) can be prescribed as a non-drug treatment for a major clinical syndrome of childhood. 

A total of 600 children participated in trial studies before FDA approval for general use was granted. In general, school performance was enhanced, but there were some negative side effects that were not considered by the FDA to be serious: frustration, headaches, dizziness, emotional reactions, and aggression. It seems important to weigh whether the risks of these particular side effects are worth the benefits of better behavior and grades in school. From these early reports, it argues for conducting more extensive empirical research to confirm the appropriateness of the paradoxical “prescribing the problem” as a therapy.

For more information:

Gaming Disorder and Internet Addiction is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the controversial mental health condition of gaming disorder, and the broader concept of internet addiction.

Parents, educators, and health care professionals have all expressed concerns about the proliferation of electronic devices and their negative effects throughout our society. Professional organizations have moved toward considering that the overuse of such devices may be diagnosable mental disorders. These actions have raised a number of related legitimate and controversial issues, which professionals, parents, and societal leaders must address. This course will review the latest developments in this area and some of the pros and cons of those issues.

Gaming disorder itself may be regarded as a subarea of the broader concept of internet addiction. Some of the topics addressed in this course include Process and Problems of Approval of New Disorders, Scientific Issues of Reliability and Validity in the DSM, Does Playing Violent Video Games Cause Violent Behavior, and Substance-Related Addictions. Course #11-31 | 2019 | 20 pages | 10 posttest questions


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

COVID-19: Picking Up the Pieces

COVID-19: Picking Up the Pieces is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the effects of the pandemic and the challenges we face moving forward.

COVID-19: Picking Up the Pieces is a new 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that examines the effects of the pandemic and the challenges we face moving forward.

This course will discuss the many aspects of COVID-19 that have affected us all, physically, psychologically, and economically. It will begin with a discussion of what pandemics are, and what differentiates COVID-19 from previous pandemics. We will then turn our attention to the psychological effects of a pandemic – from anxiety, fear, and uncertainty, economic and vocational challenges, to social isolation and the physical challenges that further compromise psychological adjustment. We will then look at the effects of starting over – from re-entry and reorganization to chronic anxiety, triggering, and even the stigma of being infected by or exposed to the virus.

Next, we will explore the ways in which the clinician can help the client. We will learn how shifting the client’s attitude toward adversity, introducing them to post-traumatic growth, and encouraging insight and reflection can promote psychological growth, even in times of psychological distress. The last section of this course consists of specific exercises the clinician can use with the client coping with COVID-19. Course #21-42 | 2020 | 39 pages | 15 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Posture Over Power for Success

So often we rely on title or rank to determine eligibility. Those who have the right credentials can proceed, while the rest of us must stand aside, bemoaning that we may never have what it takes to succeed.

Posture doesn’t just convey confidence, it has a strong effect on making us think and act in more powerful ways. How is your posture right now?

But is that entirely true? Are title and rank sole determinants of success?

Asking that question, researchers conducted three experiments to explore the effects of body posture versus role on power-related behaviors.

The first two experiments placed participants in expansive (i.e. open) or constricted (i.e. closed) body postures, while also placing them in a high or low power role. For example, in the expansive posture condition, participants were asked to place one arm on the armrest of a chair and the other arm on the back of a nearby chair; they were also told to cross their legs so the ankle of one leg rested on the thigh of the other leg and stretched beyond the leg of the chair. Conversely, in the constricted posture condition, participants were asked to place their hands under their thighs, drop their shoulders and place their legs together.

What Galinsky and his team found should have us all sitting a little straighter. During various tasks such as a word completion exercise and a blackjack game, participants with open body postures were thinking about more power-related words and generally took more action than those with closed body postures. While people in a high-power role reported feeling more powerful than did those in a low-power role, this had little effect on the action they took (Galinsky et al., 2017).

The takeaway, notes Galinsky, is that role and posture independently affect our sense of power, but posture is more responsible for activating power-related behaviors (Galinsky et al., 2017).

In a third experiment, the researchers asked participants to verbally record a time when they were in a high or low-powered position while adopting either expansive or constricted body postures. Next, they asked them whether or not they would take action in three different scenarios.

Here again, posture won out. Participants in the expansive body posture condition took action more often than those with constricted postures, regardless of whether they recalled a time of being in a high or low-powered role (Galinsky et al., 2017).

“Going into the research we figured role would make a big difference, but shockingly the effect of posture dominated the effect of role in each and every study” (Galinsky et al., 2017).

We cannot control rank, and we cannot immediately change title. What we can do, and what Galinsky says may be our best choice, is adopt a posture that conveys confidence.

Posture, according to Galinsky, doesn’t just convey confidence, it has a strong effect on making us think and act in a more powerful way. And it may just be the difference between getting the job, and getting passed over.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:

Poise: The Psychology of Posture is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that explores how body language can be used to better understand our clients and improve their lives.

It is said that non-verbal communication represents two-thirds of all communication. Whether it be through gestures, posture, facial expressions, personal space or eye contact, how we position and move our bodies sends a message to those we are speaking to. Our poise is often a very telling look into how we feel, and can be used as a tool to assess, and even change, psychological state.

This course will explore the body language of poise – how we hold ourselves, position our bodies, sit, stand, walk, and carry ourselves – to examine the link between posture and psychology, an exciting new field called psychobiomechanics. We will look at the research on psychobiomechanics and the science behind body/mind (also known as bottom-up) approaches. Then we will explore what poise can tell us about how to detect common psychological conditions such as depression, anxiety, fear, anger, and mistrust. Lastly, we will learn the powerful skills needed to utilize poise to overcome fear, build confidence, connect with others, and call upon our best selves. Course #21-27 | 2018 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

How Yoga Can Improve Your Health

Yoga has long been touted for its many health benefits. One study of 750 heart disease patients found that after six months of three hourly sessions of yoga, significant reductions in LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and waist circumference were found. And when yoga and exercise sessions were performed for six months, the effects were even greater (Tanwar et al., 2017).

How Yoga Can Improve Your Health

Another study found that in a group of veterans (who had reported experiencing depression for an average of over 11 years) who completed nine weekly session of yoga of approximately 2.5 hours each, levels of depression, rumination, anxiety, stress, and worry were found to be lower – and remained lower when tested four months later – than before the yoga intervention (Vollbehr et al., 2017).

Yet another study done by researchers at Waterloo found that just practicing 25 minutes of Hatha yoga or mindfulness meditation per day boosted the brain’s executive functions, cognitive abilities linked to goal directed behavior, and the ability to control knee-jerk emotional reactions, habitual thinking patterns and actions (Luu & Hall, 2017).

For Timothy Mccall, who is both a Western trained physician and practicing yogi, and the author of Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health and Healing, however, it is yoga’s prescriptive benefits that offer the most promise. He cites numerous conditions, such as chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, depression, chronic fatigue, insomnia, and arthritis where well known experts like Rodney Yee, Patricia Walden, and John Friend have used yoga as a way to directly treat, and dramatically improve, numerous symptoms.

Defining yoga as “a systematic technology to improve the body, understand the mind, and free the spirit,” McCall offers what could truly be considered a paradigm shift in the world of western medicine – that yoga can be used as medicine itself. In his fascinating book, he offers a broad based guide for anyone looking to used yoga to improve symptoms related to specific conditions, as well as a review of the best practices, suggestions, and exercises physicians can use immediately to improve the health of their patients.


Professional Development Resources is a non-profit provider of online continuing education courses for healthcare professionals and is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Bullying: Why Kids Need to Learn Resilience

Bullying, for most kids, is a fact of life. It will happen in some form, at some point in their lives. For parents, the question is: How can we better protect our children from bullying?

Bullying, for most kids, is a fact of life. It can happen on the playground, and it can happen online. This is why we need to teach kids resilience.

Asking this question, researchers used a validated biopsychosocial 10-item resilience scale to explore the relationship between resilience and experience with bullying and cyberbullying. The scale included statements like “I can deal with whatever comes my way,” “I am not easily discouraged by failure,” and “Having to cope with stress makes me stronger.” Also included were items assessing both the protective capacity of resilience as well as its reparative ability to restore equilibrium in the lives of youth when they face adversity.

Drawing from a nationally-representative sample of 1,204 American youth ages 12 to 17, what the researchers found should have us all rethinking resilience: uniformly, students with higher levels of resilience were bullied at school or online less often, and among those who were bullied, resilience served as a buffer, insulating them from being affected in a negative manner at school (Hinduja & Patchin, 2018).

In Hinduja’s words, “Resilience is a potent protective factor, both in preventing experience with bullying and mitigating its effect. Resilient kids are those, who for a variety of reasons, are better able to withstand external pressures and setbacks and are less negatively impacted in their attitudes and actions than their less-equipped peers when facing this type of victimization” (Hunduja, 2018).

As Hinduja and Patchin note, there has been much attention to bullying, and various anti-bullying campaigns exist, however, what is often forgotten is the role and responsibility of the child who is bullied.

“We want children to learn and develop the skills they need to deal with problems, and yet we rarely help them engage with those problems so that they can grow in their ability to solve them. Instead, we seek to constantly protect and insulate them – instead of bolstering their self-confidence, problem-solving ability, autonomy, and sense of purpose – which are all innate strengths,” says Hinduja (Hinduja, 2018).

The takeaway, according to Hinduja, is that kids do have the ability to become resilient, and develop agency to allow or disallow much of the harm that others try to inflict – and youth-serving adults have a responsibility to teach and model for them the proper strategies to deflect, dismiss, or otherwise rise above the insults and hate.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Courses:

Building Resilience in your Young Client is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings. Click here to learn more.

Cyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE) course that reviews evidenced-based research for the identification, management, and prevention of cyberbullying. Click here to learn more.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!



Consuming Media: How Much is Too Much?

We are now spending as much as 15.5 hours per day consuming media in some form. We want to know what’s happening in the world in relation to COVID-19. We want to know what’s happening with the FBI/Flynn case. We want to know what our favorite celebrities are doing during quarantine. We want to know a lot of things…

We are all consuming media at alarming rates, but how much is too much?

Yet our total consumption of media isn’t the only thing that continues to trend sharply upward. Violence in the media has also been increasing year after year, especially the amount of gun violence in top-grossing PG-13 movies – which can be seen by children of all ages. And violence is not exclusive to movies. Media reports of school crime were found to over-represent the potential for danger. To be clear, data shows that less than 1 percent of murders of children occur on school grounds.

And all this exaggeration of violence in the media causes us to come to some pretty inaccurate conclusions about the likelihood of violence and perpetuates the very stereotypes that likely contribute to ongoing violence.

But what about during a national crisis? What is the effect of saturating your brain with information that points to a danger like that of the coronavirus?

As it turns out, it is not much different from exposing your brain to overexaggerated accounts of violence.

The end result is well, acute and chronic stress. In short, this type of exposure makes the danger live on – inside your head. But that’s not all. Numerous studies have shown that viewing violent or fear invoking media causes changes in our brains and behavior, such as increased risk of aggression, increased anxiety, disrupted sleep, increased impulsivity, and risk of addiction, and increased rates of depression.

And yet, we have the choice, every day, to click on the media reports, to scroll through our friends’ Facebook posts, to search for more information about COVID-19. I’m not saying we shouldn’t do that. What I am saying is that we shouldn’t do only that. Or better yet, we should adopt a 3 to 1 ration of positive to negative information. This, after all, is the ratio put forth by Author Barbara Frederickson in her book, Positivity: Groundbreaking Research Reveal How To Embrace the Hidden Strength of Positive Emotions, Overcome Negativity and Thrive to boost happiness.

So maybe next time you want to check the media for the latest news on the coronavirus, think twice. It may likely be better to find something uplifting and positive to view (or do) instead.

Related Online Continuing Education (CE) Course:


Psychological Effects of Media Exposure
 is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that explores the psychological effects that media exposure has on both the witnesses and victims of traumatic events.

This course will explore why we are so drawn to traumatic events and how media portrayals of these events influence our thoughts, conclusions, and assumptions about them. It will then discuss how the intersection of trauma and media has evolved to provide a place for celebrity-like attention, political agendas, corporate positioning, and even the repackaging, marketing, and selling of grief.

Lastly, the course will look at the interventions and exercises clinicians can use to help their clients understand the effects of trauma becoming public, how to protect themselves, and most importantly, how to recover from traumatic experience – even when it becomes public. Course #21-23 | 2018 | 44 pages | 15 posttest questions 

Click here to learn more.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Three Inspiring Activities You Can Do With Your Kids

Being at home with our kids during a pandemic is new to us all. Just what do you do all day with them? How do you keep them engaged, entertained, and active? Well, here are three inspiring activities you can enjoy with your kids while they are at home:

1. Take A Nature Walk

Getting outside is one of the best ways to clear our heads, get some exercise, and, for a brief moment, take a mental break.

Getting outside is one of the best ways to clear our heads, get some exercise, and, for a brief moment, take a mental break from our situation. It also breaks up the drudgery of feeling locked inside. Even if you only go outside for a few minutes, taking the time to get outside every day with your kids will boost your mood, give you something to look forward to and give you opportunity to explore parts of your neighborhood that you otherwise would never have time to. And as a bonus, to make it an even more inspiring activity, schedule your walk around sunrise or sunset, take some beautiful pictures and share them with your friends as a way to lift their moods, too.

2. Write A Story

Story writing is one of the most therapeutic and inspiring activities available, and it can also be highly interactive and fun. And when you write a story with your kids, you also engage them in a way that is highly enlightening. So, to begin, ask your child(ren) to write a first chapter of the story. It does not matter how long or short, complex or simple it is. The point is just to get started.

Story writing is one of the most therapeutic and inspiring activities available, and it can also be highly interactive and fun. And when you write a story with your kids, you also engage them in a way that is highly enlightening.

Next, you write the following chapter. Then your kid writes the next one, and so on. The idea is that through sharing your imagination and creativity, you create something larger with your kids. In the process, you allow them to share their thoughts, feelings, and desire for expression with you in a way that is safe, creative, and engaging. Likely, what you will both find is that you won’t want the project to stop.

3. Start A Fundraiser

Social responsibility is an invaluable lesson. And, interestingly, it is also linked to mental health. When you give back, help others, and do something for the greater good, it makes you feel good too. As Adam Grant, the author of Give And Take: A Revolutionary Approach To Success notes, giving back to others is linked to a wide range of success measures. Yet, it is something that could probably be emphasized a whole lot more in today’s society. So, now that your kids are at home, you have the opportunity to teach them how they can help others and experience the benefits that come with it.

Social responsibility is an invaluable lesson. And, interestingly, it is also linked to mental health. When you give back, help others, and do something for the greater good, it makes you feel good too.

Start by choosing a person, or group of people that you would like to help. Next, work with your child to write a compelling description of the situation the person or group is in. Have your kids think about the most important reasons that this person, or group, needs help, and what specifically you are asking people to do.

Then, with your kids, find a platform to post your fundraiser. There are many available like GoFundMe and Indiegogo. Lastly, together with your kid, share your fundraiser on all your social media sites, with your friends and contacts. When your kids can see the effects of spending time and energy to help others, you teach them an important lesson about social responsibility, but you also help them find a very effective way to build success.

Being at home with your kids can be exhausting and overwhelming. But it can also be an opportunity to spend quality time with them with these inspiring activities.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Professionals


Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Professionals
 is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE) course that will present evidence-based research and best practices in clinical supervision of mental health professionals.

Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Professionals is a 4-hour online CE course that will present evidence-based research and best practices in clinical supervision of mental health professionals. Topics include developmental models of supervision, ethics, risk management, the use of technology, diversity awareness, self-care, and burnout prevention.

As we discuss the various aspects of supervision, we will consider evidence-based research and guidelines as recommended by the American Psychological Association (APA), The Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and more.

Topics presented will include developmental models of supervision, ethics, risk management, the use of technology, and diversity awareness.

We will discuss the goals of the supervisory experience and highlight strategies for building an open and trusting relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee, considering how this may be different from a therapeutic relationship. Information on record keeping and accurate documentation is provided and performance evaluations will be included, along with information about disciplinary actions, disciplinary supervision, and termination.

Lastly, we will discuss self-care and burnout prevention. The information presented here is an overview and it is recommended that professionals use this course as a guide for further study and to develop their own competency as clinical supervisors.

*Note: This course meets the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, MFT & Mental Health Counseling’s requirement of 4 hours qualified supervision training in every third renewal cycle and information specific to Florida is included after the ‘Resources’ section at the end of the course.

Course #40-49 | 2020 | 78 pages | 25 posttest questions

Click here to learn more.

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. The course is text-based (reading) and the CE test is open-book (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document).

Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You’ll have 3 years from purchase date to complete for credit.


Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Georgia State Board of Occupational Therapy; the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors (#MHC-0135); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Enjoy 20% off all online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses @pdresources.orgClick here for details.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!